17 February 2010

Chateau Multicultural

 

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I found this house for sale on Sotheby’s Real Estate web site HERE.    Located on Lake Norman in Charlotte, North Carolina, it is listed for a cool $15,000,000.   Recession?  What recession?   The listing details make you think the house was built when Abraham, Isaac and Jacob walked the earth:  “Ancient craftsmanship, incredibly ornate details from the Biblical Stone in the Grand Foyer to the imported French limestone walls.”    OK.   The new house even has a name “Chateau Lyon.”   And to go along with all that pretension, even the rooms have fancy monikers:  The Grand Foyer, The Loggia, The Grand Salon, The Palm Court – what is that? and The Morning Room.    The house is also multicultural:  Mexican Pinon stone surrounds, antique European roof tiles, French boiserie, Italian chandelier (in the Palm Court), and Texas limestone foundation walls.   Despite all the fancy labels, the house is decorated with a very youthful flair.  The interior designer was not listed in the details, but I guessed who it was with the first picture of le Grande Fo-yer.  Can you guess who the very talented designer is?   

 

 

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Whoa – what a foyer!  I wonder if this doubles as a living area?   I love the round settee in the middle – this piece is a real clue to who the designer is.   Do you know now???   Portieres separate this room from the family area.  

 

 

 

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A close-up of the iron railing and stone stairs.  I love the stone flooring – it adds such a permanence to a house.

 

 

image In the foyer, golden curtains with trim hang over a small niche. 

 

 

image Looking down at the Grand Foyer,  from this view it somehow seems smaller.   What a gorgeous staircase, I love the stone treads.

 

 

 

 

image The dining room aka The Palm Court is off to the left of the Grand Foyer.  I refuse to call these rooms by their real names, like entry hall!   Notice the trumeaus inset in the French boiserie.

 

 

 

image A smaller table sits in the bay window.   Again, the apothecary jar filled with colored water gives another clue as to who the designer is, so do the colorful fabric choices.

 

 

image Another set of portieres separate The Palm Court from the hall.       

 

 

image The large lighting fixture is the advertised Italian chandelier,  what a beauty!  

 

 

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 In The Grand Salon, aka the family room, there is a huge fireplace that looks like you could walk in it.   What a beauty! 

 

 

 

 

image From this view, the Grand Salon looks very large.   The Grand Foyer is the opening on the left and the kitchen is to the right.   The ceiling here is pecky cypress, a beautiful wood, one of my favorites.

 

 

 

 

imageThe back wall is made of stone, while the other walls are faux painted.  The master bedroom is through the doors on the left of the fireplace.  

 

 

image The Loggia, or the patio to you and me.  The ceiling here is more of the pecky cypress. 

 

 

 

image This is the master bedroom, but truly all the bedrooms are so luxurious it is hard to tell.  The walls have a very faint mural painted on them.   This bedroom is located right off the Grand Salon, to the left of the fireplace. 

 

 

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In the mirror’s reflection you can see into the Grand Salon.  The Loggia is located off the windows, on the left.   Notice the hardware on the chair arms!  Another clue to who the designer is – did you guess yet?

 

 

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The master bathroom is incredible.  Look at the shower on the right!   More chandeliers and sconces.   The bathroom is treated like another room – typical of this designer’s style.

 

 

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A closeup of the sink area.  Notice how the tiled floor flows up so high on the walls.   So pretty!

 

 

 

image This round room has another wood ceiling with beams.  Is this the library?  Again, the round ottoman with the Greek key trim is a hint to who the designer is – figure it out yet???

 

 

image The kitchen is really pretty with painted cabinets and the stone floor. 

 

 

image Now THAT’S a range hood!   And check out the range itself.  That alone probably cost more than the average house in America does!  Is that copper????  Whoa!!!!!!

 

 

image An antique butcher’s table rests under a cow’s head.  Anyone want a steak??

 

 

imageThe upstairs hallway has a groined ceiling and 250 year old pine floors.

 

 

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An upstairs balcony off the Grand Foyer.

 

 

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This balcony over looks the Grand Salon.   There are five bedrooms in Chateau Lyon.

 

 

 

 

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Another bedroom, here you can really see the antique wood floors.  Very pretty room!  Notice the wonderful window and its surround. 

 

 

 

 

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Another bedroom filled with antiques and a suzani bedspread.

 

 

imageThe same bedroom – I love the bed and the oval sculpture above it.  So pretty!

 

 

image  A bathroom, with arches and stone floor and footed tub.  

 

 

 

 

imageAh, this must be THE Morning Room!    Charming! 

 

 

 

image The Morning Room overlooks the lake out back.   What a beautiful piece of property.

 

 

imageThe Loggia leads down to the lake.   This is off the Grand Salon and Master Bedroom.  

 

 

 

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A wide view of the back of the house.  I didn’t realize there were that many fireplaces in the house.

 

 

image For just $15 million, this can be yours too!

If you want to guess who the designer is, leave a comment.  If you knew who it was before, don’t ruin the fun for everyone else!!

 

And don’t forget tomorrow is the last day to enter the Skirted Roundtable giveaway HERE.

158 comments:

  1. I know who it is, so I won't spoil it here.
    It's lovely, with some remarkable pieces. but gee.... so large...so grand. A wee bit too Norma Desmond for me, I'm afraid. Although I adore that kitchen and morning room.

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  2. Aaaahh! Could I be the first to comment? Joni, you always provide the most incredible homes, photos, and commentary; this post was no different. Thank you so much! You are truly the best!

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  3. I almost hate to say it since I think I am the first comment. I am almost 99% sure as I have done a photo shoot at a show house he did in Montecito a few years back. His signature style is all over this. It is either him or a clone...my guess is BARRY DIXON. ~jermaine~

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  4. My guess is Barry Dixon too. The ottoman, I believe, is his design? I am now off to his website to confirm this.

    This is fun! And what an incredibly beautiful chateau!

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  5. Get out of town! That is "some house" as E.B. White might have said! Joni, it's JUST $15 big ones, go ahead, buy it--we can all live there in a happy blog villa!

    It's just crazy, don't you think? : )

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  6. I'm not good at contests but maybe Bunny Williams, probably not - not enough printed fabrics.

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  7. Ok - there is SO much going on in this house it's a mess (architeturally). It's BEAUTIFULLY decorated so don't get on my case too hard! But that architect should be shot. Some really nice details though. just wow -so over the top.
    PS - the hallway isn't groin vaulted - you could call it vaulted though, just not groin.
    this is the meanest comment I've ever left -i'm so sorry!! It's beautifully decorated!

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  8. Ho-lee cow. Quite a place. But if you dissect it into smaller pieces and scale it down a bit (a lot!) there are loads of great ideas here that even a mere mortal like myself can use. Love the Morning Room and the bedroom with twin closets and lavender bergere is going into my files right this minute. Thanks for the tour, Joni!

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  9. All and all good fun...( I'm with architect design comments) rather like many of the Robber barons homes of the late 1800's early 1900's (athough this may seem big today it's on the small side compared to then) Little of this little of that....I wonder how many generations it will last? thanks for the look Joni I enjoyed it all and all and there are some fun ideas.
    Heather

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  10. Aaahhh yes! Of course, this one I have seen, just gorgeous!
    Love it!
    L.

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  11. That is Barry Dixon. Those are his pieces from Tomlinson Erwin Lambreth.

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  12. Oh, my. I have no idea who the designer might be. It's all just so, so much to take in. The chairs in all the photos seem oddly diminutive because the space is so enormous. I wouldn't buy it if I had $15M---not my style, but it is fun to look!

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  13. Okay, I'm down on the floor, who is going to pick me up? This house is a dream! Stunning! I could fill this house with loads of family members and it would then feel like home!

    Ruthie

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  14. Words fail me...What an incredible house, xv.

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  15. My guess from some of the elements including some of the colors would be Suzanne kasler. Although it appears a little too frou frou in other rooms for her aesthetic. The architecture is too jumbled for me. The palm court with the soft greens And blues is my favorite.

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  16. While there is so much to love, the view, the materials, much of the decor, it is just too much in my opinion. And the vastness, I wonder if I could ever feel at home?
    Janell

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  17. There is certainly quite a bit happening here. I'm all for mixing styles but not so sure this works (for me, sorry!). Though some of the tile is fantastic - kitchen backsplash? Stunning. And I'll take a master bath that size any day...

    Marija

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  18. The morning room and the master are my favorites!! Amazing quality ,,,love the stone and the fireplaces!
    Karena

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  19. Beautifully decorated inside as AD said, but the outside from the back is a bit undecided about what it wants to be. And for $15m you'd probably expect that not be an issue.

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  20. Ok..all I can say is..Can I move in? Great house, but $15m is a bit out of my price range..lol..~lulu

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  21. This is the home o a NASCAR driver!

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  22. What a feast for the eyes. I think the best part about it is the beautiful view outside. Lovely!

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  23. I was struck by the beautiful photography, it really is wonderful. The home is pretty spectacular too!

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  24. All I could think of is how much it must cost to heat and cool this house!! And I love the Master bedroom, I have a bed in my guest room like that one and I love the curve design. Beautiful!!

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  25. My mouth is on the floor. Not everything in the decor is how I would have done it, but the home is absolutely stunning. A French Chateau...in North Carolina! Who knew???

    Judy

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  26. Wow, it is gorgeous.

    A bit different to most french chateaux here in France :-)

    Leeann x

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  27. Stunning but I can't fathom living in a place like that or I guess if I could afford it I wouldn't mind my two and four legged naughty children on the furniture. I am throwing Windsor Smith's name in the hat...

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  28. Incredible. I can only imagine what it must be like living in a house like this. I don't have a guess on the designer so I will just have to wait until he/she is revealed.

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  29. I'm with AD above too...the decorating saves it...well, that and that stove! YUM!

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  30. WOW! - about sums it up doesn't it? I love the old world details, but the bedroom where you call attention to the window and its trim, the staircase, the copper stove, the morning room, and the fireplace in the Grand Salon take the proverbial cake! Thanks for sharing!
    Best,
    Stephanie

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  31. I forgot to guess, I am going to say Mr. Dixon.

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  32. My guess is Windsor Smith. I thought that when I saw the round settee in the entry..oh excuse me, Grande Foyer. Is that correct?

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  33. Wow!!! My vote is for Dixon as well. Did anyone think the postage stamp rug at the GRAND ENTRY HALL'S door was a tad (to say the least) chintzy?

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  34. Wow, they are livin' large in North Carolina! yikes! It takes alot of furniture to fill up a house that size.

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  35. I'm stunned. I guess the responsible parties don't believe that "elegance is refusal."

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  36. Dixon does extravagent and classical very well...but I'm just not sure. Now my head hurts from all the examining. Can I please just have someone bring me a drink this evening on the veranda while I enjoy the view?

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  37. I had to look it up. Clearly a designer that has no budget.......Barry Dixon is a new discovery for me thanks to you. Incredible. Wonder if Chateau Lyon could be rented......furninshed......lol. So many great ideas that are simple to duplicate at a poor mans price.
    Thanks for sharing this dreamlike home.
    Barbara Collins†
    madreminutes.blogspot.com

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  38. The furnishings are beautiful, but the house itself is too . . . gaudy? rococo? garish? I'm laughing at the Nascar driver comment. Very amusing.

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  39. I forgot to say that the setting was out of this world gorgeous. I might even be able to put up with the pretentiousness of the house, if I could wake up to the view of that water every day. (Some of the flourishes would have to go, though.)

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  40. I'll have to do a drive-by boating the next time we are at our lake house (which, incidentially, would fit in the "Grand Fo-yea" with rooom to spare. I'm no expert, so I'm not guessing, but I'm still sort of speechless at the whole thing... that's one big house.

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  41. It is definitely B.D. His trademarks are all over. His furniture, the nailhead finishes, golden colors, colored water in apothecary jar, wrought iron curtain rod with curved returns... He is in my top 5. Thanks for posting it. So gorgeous. Heather

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  42. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  43. The large stone "sphere" in the foyer, upholstered chair back with nail trim, glass fixture above the round table in the window bay, draped doorways, luxurious fabrics with simple patterns the symmetrical balance of every space without using pairs - feels like Barry Dixon to me too

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  44. Being a North Carolina native I cannot help but tell you my very first thought as I looked at these pictures ... I imagined a man and woman calling up their friends and saying, "Come on over to the Chat-toe on Sund-ee and we'll drank Natch-ral Lite and watch the race!" Nascar race that is. Not that there is anything wrong with that as they say! It being in the Old North State I am allowed to poke fun.

    Sharon

    PS - It is hard to type redneck!

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  45. As soon as I saw it I thought Barry Dixon. Great post Joni!

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  46. I say Barry Dixon and I am in love with the dining room. ahhhhhh.

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  47. I'm new to blogging so this is a real treat! This is definitely over the top...does the price include any furnishings. I can't even begin to venture a guess on that. The Morning Room is great! So many little details that can be scaled down...love the butcher's table, pictures running down the wall to the baseboards...so many adaptable ideas!

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  48. My guess is Suzanne Kasler.
    That dining room is to die for.
    I love the staircase and the overdoor details. Wow! Thanks for finding this and sharing it with all of us.
    Colleen for Swede Collection

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  49. Over the top! Love it! We go on vacation to Sunset Beach, NC, every year. Recently we start thinking about buying a second home on the water. .... WOW, I just found it! I sent it to my husband (hahaha).
    Thank you Joni.

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  50. So Joni, when is the first cook out? I'll be there:)

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  51. So many great elements; I'll take the dining room chandelier! thanks for sharing, Joni!

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  52. What?!! you mean every home doesn't have room names like "Grand Salon" and "Palm Court"? Does this mean I have to start calling my "Salon of grande cuisine" the kitchen again? rats!

    Really lovely home, fabulous ideas and colors. Thanks for the fantastic pics.

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  53. Beautifully decorated -- here's my guess on the architectural firm: Wretched Excess Overthetop et Cie.

    When I saw that copper stove, all I could do is cry for the indentured servant whose sole task is to keep it untarnished.

    Love the stone floors, though.

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  54. If indeed it is over the top then that's what I love. I'll take it!

    Interesting comments...Make the world go round!

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  55. Um, one can have a real chateau in the South of France for half of that ...

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  56. oh my gosh. it's insane. i'll be honest and at first thought windsor smith because of the foyer piece but am now guessing it's BD since everyone seems to think so. ha! Ii guess it would have been a very subdues windsor, huh? ;) so beautiful and just love all the aged finishes.
    xoxo

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  57. I LOVE the bedrooms--they're exquisite, but where in the master bath do you put your toothbrush--beside the candlestick?

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  58. Thanks for the great tour Joni but this house has TOO MUCH going on! That's the problem with houses this big, they feel like a muesem, not a home. There is no way any family needs that much space!

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  59. Unbelievable house! I was just scrolling down, loving the photos until I got to that copper stove and range hood and my heart stopped! I am curious how much that would cost--not that I am planning on buying. Where do you even get a stove like that? I have a similar cow's head over my stove. Which makes me wonder of Charles Faudree is the designer. And to think this whole house on the lake cost 15 million! Which is an enormous amount, but here it would be double.....In France, half!

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  60. The decor has Barry Dixon written all over it! I loved the master bedroom and the morning room (or should that be "salle de matin"?). The ground floor of my poor little "chateau" would fit into the master bathroom!

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  61. BD for sure! BTW While this house is truly over-the-top is looks and price -- I FAR prefer his own decor book (I have TWO copies! LOL) Check out the kitchen on pages 56-57 OR the kitchen on pages 38-39! Those rooms are livable but extraordinary spaces!

    Jan at Rosemary Cottage

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  62. If I moved in tomorrow: Clean out the clutter in the entry - let the fabulous bronze stair rail and stone floors speak for themselves - put the dining chandelier in the entry, chisel off the "over the top" french carvings above the arch to the dining room,(Love the old world curtained niches used for a quiet tete a tete)replace the doors to the M. Bedrm. - (again the too too french carvings)- I hope there is a media room because only 2 people have a view of the t.v that may or may not be hiding in the tortoise shell topped cabinet in the Family room. Give away the mauve circle rug in the M. Bedroom to the same Granny I give the 15 glass urns in the M.bathroom to.(After I knocked over and broke 2 pairs while trying to brush my teeth.)Do wish the hall ceilings were groin vaulted,Joni, alas they're only vaulted. And I have a sneaking suspicion the whole house was built around that AMAZING hulking copper edifice in the kitchen. An alpha dog if I ever saw one. I love your posts like this - so we get to play "what would you do if..."

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  63. It is definitely Barry Dixon! The nail head trim on the settee and the mottled walls are the give away. I designed a house in Palm Beach where several of his designs were the inspiration. Beautiful home designed by a gifted designer.

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  64. Good GRIEF. Those names are almost too much to take! That's a lot of house!

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  65. Just a quick question .... just what the heck is the odd giant stone ball in the foyer? Accessory? Artwork? Forgotten item by the stonemasons? (("Harry, where IS that giant stone ball thingie -- did we leave it lying around somewhere?")) Somebody is gonna trip over that thing!

    LOL! Jan at Rosemary Cottage

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  66. Oh! My eyes are hurting, this is too much, too beautiful. I don't care who it is, I'm in love. Now I have to print out all the pics for reference. Joni, why do you do this. . .
    Nora
    Albuquerque

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  67. This house could not possibly have been designed by an architect - it has house designer written all over it as well as race car culture. I am reluctant to offer up this name because I enjoyed the Skirted Roundtable interview so much, but the Greek Key made me think of Grant Gibson (say it ain't so!). One observation about this house - money can't buy pedigree.

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  68. I absolutely loved it all! I know it is wrong to covet but I couldn't help myself. There are so many great inspiring ideas. My first thought for a designer was Saladino but he is a minimalist so after reading Jermaine's comment I am checking out Barry Dixon. Thank so much for this exciting post.

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  69. Hi Joni,
    I just saw your comment...a nice surprise to hear my unsure stab was correct. I posted on DB from Houston's house finally today. A bit less extravagent than this little number wouldn't you say! But, definately more my speed.
    Thanks,
    ~Rebecca

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  70. I totally agree with AD, What a mess. There should be a limit to what architects are willing to do to satisfy customers. You cannot buy culture. Wrong centuries, wrong cultures, wrong location. Wrong, wrong, wrong. Where are you Louis Sullivan? Your lessons were needed so badly.

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  71. I feel like I need to look at this about ten times just to digest it.
    There are things I love and things I absolutely can't stand about this.I mean some of it is French chateau but with Victorian like touches. I love the dining room, and some of the bedrooms.I think I would take room by room to comment. So I'm going to just enjoy the view. Maryanne:)

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  72. Karen@ Junking in GeorgiaFebruary 18, 2010 at 6:08 PM

    rather a bit too much.. the language used to describe the house, the names of the rooms.. all too silly.. real estate writing is often so over the top all it is good for is a laugh.. my favorite is the "Biblical Stone" just what in the hell is Biblical Stone? Perhaps if it has fire marks they could claim it came from Sodom ............

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  73. Lovely interiors, heinous faux chateau architecture. Of course, I want the details about the seller. Charlotte is bank central--home office to Wachovia and Bank of America--or whatever their current names are. Also home of U.S.Air. So. Deposed banking czar? Grounded airline exec? Ruined televangelist? (Remember Jim and Tammy Faye Baker lived just across the line in Fort Mill, S.C.)Or just another spec builder/developer with bad timing and worse taste? Hmmm.

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  74. what a brilliant home! thanks so much for sharing my dear, and i hope you're having a wonderful week!

    xo urban flea :)
    http://www.urbanfleadesign.net

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  75. I discovered through my investigation that this house is owned by a real estate developer. On Google Maps the house is still under construction. Sotheby's didn't list the address, but I found it out anyway!

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  76. Wow! My mouth is hanging open. Luxurious is the only way to describe it. I don't know who the designer is but I can't wait to find out.

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  77. OK-I'm frustrated--I can't figure out who the designer is and I need immediate satisfaction!! Lovely house, but a bit too ostentatious for me, personally. Favorite details are the iron work and the sconces, the antiques are great, too--not too stuffy. Once again, a fun and informative post.

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  78. http://www.barrydixon.com/portfolio_LakeNormanNC.htm

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  79. Mary Kay Andrews, I can assure you that no one in the financial industry in Charlotte would touch this house with a "10 foot pole". This is a transport from the north who moved to the area for the weather or it is as someone stated part of the "race culture". The former Pres. and CEO of Bank of America currently has his home on the market for $4.5 million and believe me it is exquisite compared to this "royalty wannabe".
    There is a lot of affluence in the Charlotte area and this home would NEVER be the envy of the old money and power brokers in the area. This is clearly a house built by a transport from another region who found that land and construction costs were a lot cheaper than where they came from. You may not believe this, but in some circles, this house is laughable. It's good to be able to distinguish diamonds from rhinestones.

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  80. Don't ya'll know that's how we all live in NC ? :)
    It's like a modern day castle with heat.

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  81. Mona Thompson Providence Ltd.February 18, 2010 at 7:47 PM

    I'm saying Barry Dixon. I really liked him before but if I am right I am in love with him now. Mona Thompson

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  82. Is it John Edwards house?

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  83. Anonymous said. . . Is it John Edwards house?

    No, even that scumbag has better taste.

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  84. i though barry dixon had good taste...what happened???

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  85. I'm inspired to go buy a lottery ticket! I love the wall treatments!

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  86. Lord that house is an abomination. The outside is heinous. Some very pretty decorating though and Joni, as always, love your comments and attention to detail. And that copper stove is bigger than my kitchen!

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  87. I guess John Saladino without having looked at the comments. Can't wait to discover.

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  88. I'm new around here, seems like a cool place though. I'll be around a bit, more of a lurker than a poster though :)
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  89. My guess: Jeffrey Bilhuber??

    I have to say the house is a tad bit much as we say back in New England. Reeks of new money and probably will never be lived in. What a waste of a spectacular view!

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  90. And you forgot to mention the elevator, generator and computer system room(alarms/tv monitors/heat/lights?)to run the place. It does have a nice pantry. For $15 mil I'd want a stable.

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  91. Sure it is big and it is sometimes gaudy but who would really turn it down??

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  92. some this home is very "heavy" for my liking, but the bedroom is gorgeous - and with that Juliet balcony!!! wow

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  93. I know the owners, and as a native of North Carolina, I can tell you that tarheels are PASSIONATE about their homes. And don't forget Biltmore House in Asheville, NC.. a Vanderbilt chateau...

    Dean Farris

    Winston-Salem and Naples

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  94. Absolutely beautiful! I love everything about it.

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  95. I've searched the Sotheby site and find no reference to the name of the builder nor the architect. It would seem that for a potential buyer that would be important information given the fact that the Lake Norman area has often had a reputation for poor construction and gaudy spec homes. Lots of lawsuits over the years from home buyers in this area. Also, does the price include the furnishings? That might make sense given it's only a 6 bedroom house.

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  96. There is so much you can get from this house!! AD the ceiling is a barrel not vaulted!

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  97. Beautiful! Love it. If I had a spare $15 Mil that needed to be invested in North Carolina (!), it would be this house and I'd have you, Joni, come out and replace all gold upholstered pieces with something more mellow. Thanks!

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  98. I would have to recover a few of the furniture pieces, but otherwise the house is move in ready for me. :)

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  99. It's refreshing to see a house of that size decorated so beautifully. Love a large house as much as the next girl, but that may be a bit too intimidating for me...despite all the truly amazing details you point out. Reminds me of hotel one might find on the shores of Lake Como. Love that nook in the foyer, like an old fashioned telephone closet.

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  100. I would love to know who the architect is.
    In spite of the fact that so many styles are mixed, the decorating
    saves it and it is actually
    beautiful! Barbara

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  101. Will they subdivide???
    I could easily live in ONE room...
    even the foyer!
    annie

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  102. I am going to weigh in one more time on this one...still standing by my original guess of Barry Dixon as the interior designer. I think I also know who the architect is, as I recognize an all too familiar floor plan, but with all the tough love flying around I would not want to expose anyone unnecessarily and would feel horrible to mistakenly invite the wrong professional to this party. Now in my professional opinion, if a gifted photo stylist and photographer had been part of this mix Mr. Dixon would have come out of this one being hailed as a genius. I have great admiration for Barry Dixon as an interior designer. But if he did his own photo styling, then he just shouldn't have...it is an art unto itself...and again, the photographer is supremely important.

    ~jermaine~

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  103. I've often wondered what $15million look like all piled up ... now I know. LOL. So many beautiful pieces but the architectural stage is just horrible and I can't relieve the int. designer of his fair share of responsibility in this catastrophe. Did we really need the added blasphemy of the faux distress in the Grand Salon Walls - it so theme-ish that it comes accross as an italian chain restaurant. I don't know where to start, or where to end, I've got a blinding headache.
    GranEscala

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  104. French Kissed - whoever the architect is he has spent a lot of time with Puff the Magic Dragon.

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  105. I just came back to see if I was right or not... wow, it takes alot to please your readers joni! I am sometimes glad my blog is little and I don't get all the critics...

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  106. um, what an amazing post as usual, joni. i love your blog....but this house. . . .gee, i'm going to sound negative. it is negative. reminds me of the beverly hillbillies with some furniture dragged in from the cleopatra set. so sorry. i'm also an armchair psychologist and believe the owner was probably from a poverty stricken background. but i believe this is the only house i have recoiled from on any of your posts. my words are not meant to discourage you at all. i love your style and blog, my dear! thank you for your devotion to the best design blog out there!

    cammie

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  107. Once again...

    http://hendrickslake.squarespace.com/interiors-by-barry-dixon/

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  108. Owned by motor mogul, race team owner and car dealer extraordinaire - Rick and Shirley Hendrick -

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  109. Barry Dixon is AMAZING! Love the hints of his beautiful furniture and fabrics throughout the home. Thanks for sharing the house Joni - beautiful!

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  110. My Goodness! What a home. While I see many lovely things in the home, I agree with one of the other posters, it's a mess architecturally. Just way too much going on. One of the secondary baths I liked. The kitchen vent hood - just too much, over the top. And what looks like not enough space between the the two islands in the kitchen. I too think this home is part of the Nascar culture. That area has a lot of huge homes belonging to the drivers and owners. Basically, a gorgeous home, but overdone to be tasteful.

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  112. Bingo people! Bingo! I don't know why I am enjoying this post so much, but I am. Probably my secret wish to become a private investigator...

    "The property is owned by Larry and Jane Hendricks." from here:
    http://www.businesstodaync.com/Asking_price_of_25_million_sets_Golden_Crescent_record-a-898.html

    Another interesting tidbit:
    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/200/story/89965.html

    He owns Boyles Furniture which has been in financial difficulties as of late. The asking price had been $25 million.

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  113. Sitting here in Lake Tahoe, under 5 feet of snow, my world is white and simple. What a feast for the senses--it almost sent me into cardiac arrest! Although I do prefer a cabin to a chateau, I loved the kitchen and drooled over that hood and copper stove--was it a La Cornue? Thanks for the fun.

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  114. Good work, Sharon - Leo Dowell, the original designer (who by the way is a legend in his own mind), has his fingerprints all over this house. His work is often gaudy in its attempt to create a sense of pedigree for his clients. Now having read that the property was the center of a dispute between the owner, Dowell and the contractor, it begs the question why Barry Dixon would put his name on anything Dowell had already done. More to the point I suppose is when did Dixon take over the project? Looks like Joni is now getting into "design mysteries". This one has been fun.

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  115. Ah!!! A truly fascinating mystery! When does another designer get "called in" to a project -- and how much leeway does he (in this case -- Dixon) have? I wonder what parts of the design belong to one -- or the other? Or can one "erase" the work of the other? Is there legal grounds for that?

    Just a curious old cat here!

    Jan at Rosemary Cottage

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  116. Two words: Nouveau Riche. Some lovely details, but it's way too much overall. I hate fake old.

    But I love how this post proves that beauty is in the eye of the beholder!

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  117. Teacats, one of the links about this house posted by a reader above goes to a site of Barry Dixon. His wording is interesting: "finished and furnished by Barry Dixon". It looks like the conflict happened during the construction phase. This makes sense.

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  118. I enjoyed reading the comments as much as looking at this house. You either love it or hate it. I loved some of the aspects of the house such as the stone work and the round room. Having grown up in a fairly large house, i prefer a smaller more intimate scale. growing up, I used to spend week ends at my friends chateaux with their tattered furniture frayed rugs and freezing temperature..... On rainy days in Newport (where my kids spent many summer with their grand mother i would visit some of the Grand houses or would attend parties there,,,I have yo say that they are quite garish.
    I will be in Charlotte next week to check on my furniture production, perhaps i should check it out...I am not sure that my husband would go for the price tag...how many housekeepers would it take to dust, clean, vacuum.....I think i will keep to my humble small house...(but would love to land a design job of that scale...)

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  119. Gorgeous - sure does look like Barry Dixon. Uses all of his furniture line. The Morning room is my fave!!! Good spot for blogging....

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  120. I am going to have to rename all the rooms in my house now! I wonder if the house comes with all it's beautiful furnishings?

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  121. I don't have a clue who the designer is... I just enjoy the heck out of your blog! That has to count for something..

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  124. Oh, La La! So very Barry Dixon. So very Southern, with out real regard for scale, proportion or true style, jsut a mishmash of really good sutff with mediocre stuff in ill proportion rooms. Just what we're known for - no wonder Americans are considered to have such bad taste. Where are design greatsl like Alex Vervoordt or that amazzzzzzing American architect & designer, JAQUELIN T. ROBERTSON, when you need them? and when will we learn true syle, design, scale, porportion and elegant simplicity of beautiful things showcased rather than smushed together as in a trade showroom. And such silly names for pretentious rooms in ill-concieved, ill proportioned spaces and the convoluted outside, OMG! Go to France open your eyes,study furniture & design & style, taking a page from Carolyne Rohem - do your homework!!!!, and stop praising such immature design! Use this blog to teach us good design, not just prepetuate gratuitous decorating.

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  125. This house looks like someone threw up all over it. This is a good example of a designer's furniture being used when it shouldn't be. It's the trap designers fall into when they can't abstain from using their own designs. There is absolutely no continuity of design and style ini this house. Looks more like a raid on a swap shop.

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  126. Good post and this post helped me alot in my college assignement. Say thank you you seeking your information.

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  127. This home has some beautiful elements and some over the top elements too. Love the floors and some of the furniture! Thanks for sharing.

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  128. WOW. This doesn't look at all like my lake house. Not a rag rug in sight!! I thought it looked like Suzanne Kasler - but only the good parts!!

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  129. Annie, you are so right. The attempt to make this "chateau" look like it grew out of the ground and then not to find any refined and beautiful antiques here is amazing. The designer filled the place with his "stuff" and called it a day. This is not his proudest moment by any means. The owner of the "chateau" is also the owner of a large retail furniture outlet. It makes me wonder if he just took a little trip up the road to High Point, filled a truck with Barry Dixon furniture and the designer put his name on it for a fee.

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  130. I have no idea who the designer might be, BUT I wouldn't mind spending the weekend there! Thanks for the Sunday morning fun.

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  131. Thanks for posting!! Shot the architect or at least pull his license.

    Using Firefox as my browser and the photo above the caption, "This is the master bedroom, but truly all the bedrooms are so...," is missing!

    Is this just my system or is it a blog issue.

    Thanks

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  132. Lots to love here. My guess is my design hero, Suzanne Kassler!

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  133. Lots to love here. My guess is my design hero, Suzanne Kassler!

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  134. Why did they have to ruin this home with a trophy sea turtle shell? Don't they know that sea turtles are seriously endangered because of either selfish or ignorant collecting? There's no excuse for it.

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  135. This is why so many Europeans think of us as "the ugly American". Big, over the top design, one step shy of Frontgate catalog.

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  136. Barry Dixon is a new name to me. But for me the house screams...Lancaster, Colefax, Fowler, etc......a round ottoman in every room. The house and it's interior and setting are just lovely

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  137. I'll just move into the morning room and whomever buys this house may never find me! laurie

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  138. Yeah, the "architecture" is unpleasant, but there are some things that are really pretty, like the bedroom with the striped french settee at the foot of the bed-lovely!

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  139. Gosh, I am so shocked by how many comments this house got! I think everyone who knows me, knows this isn't really my style - I like small houses!!! It was the names of the rooms that got to me, plus I do enjoy looking at over the top houses, esp. when someone of Barry Dixon's caliber designs the interiors. Glad everyone got to say their peace. Let's move on, now!!!!

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  140. I had left a long comment here but it disappeared!
    yes, of course it is Barry Dixon!
    I was surprised by some of the guesses though
    suzanne kasler?
    charles faudree?
    john saladino?

    but most guessed correctly. i wonder where that comment went to???

    thanks for playing everyone!
    Joni

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  141. Last to comment (behind my game here) but the second I saw the very 1st image........."You had me at hello". It's my idol, and the man I always make a blubbering idiot of myself when I am around.... Love him and every thing he does!! A few images are also on his website. Thank you for sharing......xoxo

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  142. All the way through I was thinking
    CHARLES FAUDREE.

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  143. Joni ... As usual your posts are beautiful and over the top!!

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  144. Joni ... As usual your posts are beautiful and over the top!!

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  145. Holy cow I would LOVE to spend a week with you! Homes in TX are so gorgeous, and I love, love love symmetry. What a great post! So glad I found you!

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  146. MARLENE BISSET, CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

    MY SISTER LIVES IN CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA. THIS IS THE AREA WHERE MOST OF THE NASCAR DRIVERS RESIDE. I HAVE BEEN TO SEE AND IT TRULY IS AMAZING. THANKS JONI!

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  147. hmmmm... there's a LOT going on there! don't get me wrong- i couldn't design a straw hut, so i'm not putting it down! i'll just take my imaginary 15 million elsewhere... : )
    thanks for sharing- love your blog!

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  148. It is an ah ha moment, the change in slope on the back of the huge fireplace's herringbone brick lining. That is exactly what is missing on my little miniature project, will fix that detail first thing today. It will also help me detail the firebrick on the sides. A little minor surgery with a razor saw and it will be done today. If I can't own a real stone fireplace at least I can make one in miniature.
    http://karincorbin.blogspot.com/2010/02/miniature-reward-time.html

    Thanks for the inspiration yet once again.

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  149. Beautiful!

    Ana M. Fernández
    http://bauldeanna.blogspot.com

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  150. This is a fun one Joni....I loved reading the comments. and like most people think some of the interior design is very pretty but in general it looks over the top nouveau riche. Love the opinions here.

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  151. Some people love it, some people hate it. I thought extraordinary design always stirs these emotions. I for one am glad there are people who become designers not to please the masses or even other designers but to create. What a boring world we would have if architecture repeated itself over and over with no adapting or innovation. In the 1920’s when Addison Mizner created some of the finest mansions in America for the rich and famous, it was said they were exercises in excess and not architecturally correct. Today they are still admired and have held their mystique and value. I really don’t think everyone has to like the same things; I do respect the diversity and the variety we have in this world. It does say a lot about the professions by the way they comment on other’s designs. I hope we will continue to encourage people to think for themselves and express themselves in their own creative ways. By the way I think the house is spectacular.

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  152. nice post i enjoyed the read. i will be subscribing to you rss in the mean time check out pinehurst real estate

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  153. designer is leo dowell from charlotte nc... he does amazing work!!

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  154. anyone know who built the ironwork?

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