07 April 2014

ENTIRE HOUSE DECORATING

 

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Last time we discussed decorating with one fabric.  This house, above,  featured in House Beautiful, was different though – the entire house was decorated in just one fabric – which judging by the comments seemed a bit much to a lot of you.

I personally liked the house designed by Justine Cushing, but I’m a fan of one fabric decorating.   Still I did wonder – is it a sign of good design or is it just lazy design?  After all, picking out coordinating fabrics can be tricky and it’s not always easy.  I know when I am deciding on fabrics for a client, I agonize over the prospect way too long.   I look at the chosen fabrics inside my house for days and then I take them all outside to be sure the sunlight doesn’t change their look.  

After a few weeks of this inside and outside ordeal, you then have to order the fabrics and pray that they are in stock and not backordered for months on end.   Judging by the project, if a key fabric is unavailable for months, you might have to start the process of picking out fabrics all over again.  Suddenly decorating with just one fabric seems enviable.

 

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Suzanne Rheinstein’s living room – covered in their striped summer slips – another personal favorite.  The curtains were designed for the room without the slipcovers.  Would the room look better with summer curtains too – or would that be too much, too many stripes, too much of  just one fabric?  Rheinstein is a genius with fabrics, she even designed her own line for Lee Jofa, so certainly choosing just one fabric for her living room was a choice, not done because it was easy – or she was lazy. 

Although some clients might like just one fabric decorating– most clients prefer a mix of patterns and fabrics and colors.    If the client doesn’t want the room to look busy, choosing solid fabrics in different shades can be a nice compromise.  But – decorating with a plethora of different fabrics and patterns can produce a house that is too colorful and too busy.  It’s a tricky balance to design a house that looks cohesive, as if it was designed all at once – but doesn’t look too matchy-matchy.   Many people want a house that doesn’t look like it was designed all at once, but rather they prefer that the design look as if it evolved over a period of time – adding layers over the years.

The difference between a decorated house and an evolved house is something that would be discussed with the designer at the earliest meeting.  Many designers don’t like to design an evolved house.  It’s much easier and faster to just pick furniture from a catalogue, rather than scour for unique pieces in antique shops around the globe.   Finding JUST the perfect chandelier may happen long after the initial installation and many designers and clients don’t want to wait for that discovery. 

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Another view of Rheinstein’s living room in its summer slips. 

A cohesive design can be wonderful and very practical.  I learned this lesson from my sister.  When she bought a new house many years ago, she hired the wonderful designer – Billy Frances.  He decorated her house in shades of persimmon with touches of Provencal gold and greens.   When she moved – all the furniture worked together – and we were able to move chairs from the family room into the living room and vice versa - because the original design was cohesive.  

It was an invaluable lesson for me to see how a basic plan can work from house to house.   There was no sofa or chair or antique armoire or buffet that didn’t “work” in her new house.  Even her custom rugs made for her family room looked perfect in her new living room.

 

House #1

A pro at this type of cohesive designing is Alessandra Branca, as seen in a recently finished project shown in the new Veranda.  Branca loves to use red and black in most of her designs and this house was no exception.  Another important color was gray – which showed up in wallpapers and fabrics. 

 

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The main rooms of the 1930s Chicago apartment are arranged off the large entry hall.  Here, Branca introduces the color scheme:  gray, red, gold, and black.   A beautiful Zuber wallpaper lines the upper walls.

 

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The living room with its light yellow walls is seen through the doorway.  A center table with benches underneath are a Branca trademark.

 

 

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Off the entry hall with its grisaille wallpaper, the yellow walls are the base for the gray damask and colorful paisleys.  The stairway has a red runner. 

 

 

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Another trademark – a banquette - sits in the corner of the living room – with pillows in Fortuny red and white.  Red pleated shades pop off the yellow walls. 

 

 

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Off the living room is the gorgeous dining room – my favorite room in the apartment.   The room is a study in constants – a fancy antique Swedish crystal chandelier is mixed with simple cotton slipcovers in gray and white.  The walls are covered in a gray damask. 

 

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The rug is gorgeous – with a grey ground and red paisleys.  Where in the world did she find it?  It says antique!

 

 

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The family room continues the color scheme with the gray velvet sofas and her own Branca fabric on the sofa in gray and white.  Major touches of red pop up on the coffee table and sconces’ shades.  The light fixture picks up the gray and the window shades are gray and white ticking stripe. 

 

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The stripe fabric is continued onto the barstools.

 

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The guest room is covered in the popular Old World Weavers toile in the black/gray colorway.

 

 

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The master bedroom is the only departure in the apartment from the basic gray/black/red/gold colorway.  A lot of master bedrooms are done like this – an oasis of its own colors.  Here a blue and white damask is mixed with velvet.  While the colorway differs – the Damask pattern is the same as found throughout the other rooms – which adds to the cohesiveness of the design. 

 

House #2

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Suzanne Rheinstein is another designer whose houses flow from room to room.  Though not quite as decorated as Alessandra Branca, her projects are filled with hand picked antiques and mostly muted fabrics.  For her own personal apartment in NYC, she used the decorative painter Bob Christian to paint the floors and the living room walls.  Here in the entry hall – the entire apartment’s colorway is introduced - mushroom, taupe, gray with touches of apricot.  Another element – silver – is introduced in the molding and the antique mirror and sconces.  Rheinstein describes her apartment as a “single decorative statement” – and indeed it is!

 

 

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The double living room/dining room is L shaped  - here is the main seating area with two gilt French chairs, a chaise and the sofa.  The focal point of the room is the gorgeous Christian mural in the Pilement style. 

 

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The fabrics are in shades of mushroom and taupe – as is the mural.

 

 

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The aubergine velvet sofa divides the front part of the room into two seating areas.

 

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The dining area is across from the desk and the two wing chairs which are flanked by gorgeous garden statues. 

 

 

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Close up of the antique desk, chairs and mirror.

 

 

 

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The dining table.  When guests come for dinner – the desk behind the sofa is used as a table that seats more people.

 

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Past the L Shaped living room is the sitting room with its walls upholstered in Rheinstein’s muted jacquard fabric for Lee Jofa.  Most of the upholstery wears the same fabric.  Silk pillows in apricot pop, as does the lamp.  Notice the large tortoise shell acting as a firescreen.  Stunning.

 

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The same room – facing the other direction – and looking different in this light.  Through the door is the bedroom where a large floor length mirror fools the eye into thinking the space continues on and on.

 

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Two twin canopied beds divide the master bedroom into mirror spaces.  The same color schemes continues through to this room – with just a hint more yellow.

 

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Two chintz covered French chairs are some of the only patterned fabric in the apartment.  This vignette is so beautiful – and so typical of Rheinstein. 

 

 

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And another photograph of the vignette with a standing metal vase.  Couldn’t resist showing it again!

 

 

 

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A painted chest sits outside the bedroom.

 

 

House #3

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This large house was designed for a young family by Bunny Williams.  Williams usually designs with a more acquired, layered look than a color themed look that runs throughout the entire house.  But, for this family – she used a predominate color scheme of gray, yellow, peach and blue.  The yellow is introduced in the large entry hall that shares space with a gray painted Mora clock from Sweden.

 

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The large foyer that continues off the front hall – features the yellow walls and blues – with touches of gray found in the art work.  The antique rugs lend a more acquired look to the foyer.

 

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The living room is a study in yellow and peach with gray painted chairs.   Gray is also found in the fabrics. 

 

 

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In the dining room – grayish light blue is found on the chairs and the painted floor.  I love this room.

 

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Zuber wallpaper in gray and yellow pops brings the house’s color scheme into the master bedroom.

 

House #4

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Amelia Handegan is known mostly for her work in Charleston, but she is so popular people from around the country hire her for her quiet, sophisticated, yet casual interiors.  Her houses are mostly a muted vision of antiques and fabrics most often in warm tones.  The entry to this house shows a painted floor and stair runner in these warm tones – a hint of what is to come.

 

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The living room is beautiful in creams with persimmons, apricots, browns and greens.  Most fabrics are solid with a Robert Kime coral print at the windows.  I love her style!

 

 

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The apricot continues into the beautiful dining room – the walls are lighter than the dark apricot curtains.  The muted antique rug picks up the warm colors.  Such a pretty room.

 

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The attic guest room with built in bunks in a muted print.   This is a great furniture arrangement for a vacation house – four chairs for guests to talk late into the night – while the beds are put into bunks so as not to take up too much floor space.

 

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The warm tone is continued into the butler’s pantry with an antique rug in greens and apricots and a wood countertop.

 

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More English and American antiques in the kitchen. 

 

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The guest room is done in soft lilac with another muted Robert Kime fabric at the curtains.  The lilac is a departure – but the repeat of a Robert Kime floral curtain ties it in with the rest of the décor.

 

House #5

Here is a fun house by the younger, hip designer from L.A. Ruthie Sommers.  I get a lot of complaints that I tend to show mostly subdued designs from older, conservative designers  and well, I am guilty of that because that IS the kind of design I love.  So, here to show that I can show other designers besides Gerri Bremermann and Charlotte Moss, this is from the new House Beautiful:

 

 

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In this 1920s classic Illinois house, Ruthie Sommers had a mural painted in the entry hall.  The brown and white mural sets the tone for the fun that is coming. 

 

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Ruthie started with pink and green in the living room.  The brown velvet sofa is flanked by beautiful painted consoles. A green rug grounds the seating group.  The owner had been seriously ill and her mother had the house decorated all in neutrals.  After she recovered she craved color and trim and fun.   Ruthie found a soulmate. 

 

 

 

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And another view of the room.   Ruthie mentioned the amount of pillows she used.   I’m not a fan of too many pillows.  I like them to be purposeful and spare.   Two or three at most on a sofa.  And I like my pillows big – depending on the sofa size – either 22 or 24 inch.

 

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In the dining room,  pinks continue – though with blues, not greens.  Those lamps from Swank are gorgeous!

 

imageThe homeowner started with the main Ikat that her grandparents once had.  Ruthie added all the rest of the patterns in bolder shades of the colors found around the house.  Too much?  The room is a departure from the living room and dining room which is a shame – a softer collection of ikats would make more sense with those other rooms.

 

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The guest room is decorated in a pink and green chintz – Cowtan and Tout’s Amelie.   Notice the darling headboard in pink and white dots. 

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The vanity table is beautiful!   I love the lamps with the pink shades.   You can see the bathroom with its green and white striped wallpaper through the door.  

 

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The master bedroom is in greens and corals.  The wallpaper is Farrow and Ball. 

Ruthie Sommers was the darling of the domino set for years after the magazine published her house and her sofa in a David Hicks fabric was featured on the cover.  Ruthie’s sofa probably sold more yards of that fabric than anyone combined.  For years a book was talked about – but it was never published and at end of this article Ruthie said she only takes on new jobs with old clients and is basically retired, although her web site is still online. 

It’s really hard to find a house that isn’t decorated from one end to another, because of course – those are the houses that are published.  But – a good example of a designer who decorated a house one room at a time, without a cohesive design, is Nicky Haslam’s country house that was once owned by John Fowler.  The house has no decorative scheme or color palette.  Instead it is just furnished in a very casual matter without any regard to how the other rooms are done.   The house is filled with fine antiques and some not so fine antiques.  Nicky Haslam is one of the world’s most famous interior designers – he certainly knows how to decorate a house with one cohesive design – but for his own country house, he chose to make the designer invisible.

 

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The new entry hall – added by John Fowler.

 

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The old entry and dining room – now a pass through.  Beautiful original tile floors. 

 

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The sitting room – with its original faded slipcovers, although Nicky says they still look perfect today!  Hmmm.

 

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The newly decorated dining room.

 

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The library in the former barn.  Another mix of colors and furnishings.

 

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One of the bedrooms in red and white stripes.

 

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The most recently decorated room – The Garden Room.   The beautiful chintz had me rethinking whether I wanted to start using this fabric again!!

 

 

 

What I found interesting about “one decorative theme” designing is that some of the master bedrooms seem to be exempt from the basic design.  It might be that bedrooms tend to be upstairs or away from the public rooms – so their different color theme doesn’t seem so noticeable. 

Decorating with one theme throughout is easiest done when the entire house is designed at one time.  It’s harder to have a cohesive design when a house is decorated one room at a time over a number of years.  And of course, there are many people who don’t want their house to look like a decorator was hired at all. 

Which style are you?  Do you prefer a house where all the rooms flow together with colors that coordinate throughout the house?  Or do you prefer a house that evolves over time where the designer’s hand isn’t so obvious? 

 

 

52 comments:

  1. I have to go with the decorator's invisible hand, over time. And then gone, never to return.

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  2. Oooo man! I just got Wooowww looking these awesome pictures. The designing, decoration, use of colors and fabrics even everything kept my eyes open. This post and the pictures really inspired me a lot. Thank you for sharing such lovely things here.

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  3. I was just thinking about this last night. Did you see The Wall Street Journal on Saturday? It had a large piece on coordinating wallpaper and fabric (or, rather, using the same pattern wall paper and fabric) with several examples. I thought about your previous piece. Perhaps your blog is read by WSJ? Fun to think about! thanks for wonderful posts, always. donna

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    1. really???? i missed that - and we take the WSJ! hmmm. i want to read it.

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  4. I love a house that evolves over time - patience does seem to pay off. While there is nothing wrong about a ready made and thought out symmetrical plan perse I sometimes find that it seems like it is the showhome set that an estate agent is trying to sell. I think it depends on the personality of the owner because either way it will have its own charm. Some designer's have their stamp and I wouldn't mind it in some rooms but not the whole house. PS Those slip covers on Nicky's sofa are "matured" and aged just right - new furniture is not the done thing among a certain British circle! But you have to give them credit for lasting so long. :)

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    1. well - to me they are SO faded!!! I would get new ones probably.

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  5. I am a big fan of whole house decorating. I try to keep with a theme and color palette. Such as...is does it have an old world feel, will it look good 10 yrs from now after much use, does it have a good silhouette? I try to buy in pairs because symmetry is your friend. You may not always be able to utilize both lamps or chairs depending on your situation but I always want to kick myself when I need a pair. The upside of this discipline is that one can easily move pieces and art from room to room to mix things up. Moving pieces to new rooms and mixing things up gives new life to old pieces. My kids say my favorite color is leopard. It is true I never met an animal print I didn't like! I try to keep the basics in camel, cream, black. I recently bought a mountain house in the North Carolina and am having a time trying to create my rules for that decor. I am thinking....nothing precious, rough, worn, nothing shiny, and a little campy. Again I am starting with my camel and black but will probably add a little red and maybe green or plaid. And goodness knows I have been tempted by grey but no I am sticking to my guns! I also find if you have a tight palette, you can marry together unlikely partners more easily, modern with antique etc. You can always change things up with a trendy rug or pillow or accessories. I wish I was disciplined enough to do the same in my wardrobe then I wouldn't have a huge closet with nothing to wear!

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    1. i do that in my closet - white in the summer, black in the winter. i am so boring in my clothes too!!! great comment!

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  6. I loved this post. The Branca scheme with the repeating touches of red throughout the house in particular, but all of the whole house treatments in general. Thank you!

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  7. OMGoodness, I love the Suzanne Rheinstein’s rooms. I wish I could decorate my entire house at one time!

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  8. Not a fan of having a decorator's hand visible throughout a home, but I do love the trademark color punch of red that Alessandra Branca uses - and does so well. The #3 home by Bunny Williams also appeals to me for the peach, grey and pops of yellow. I have to say, though, as I go through my HB and see something like Ruthie Sommers' house #5, I skip right past it - it doesn't appeal to me in the slightest. I typically read all the details of each feature, but have no interest in one such as that. It doesn't even look put together and, for someone who hires an entire house decorated, it would be seem shameful to know how much was probably spent. It is nice, however, for you to show the contrasts, but we love your blog for your signature taste in decor, so I wouldn't worry about those who complain about your subdued or conservative choices.

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  9. Morgan....you MUST be a long lost "soul mate!" What a fantastical read (and I do so like the photos!) Thank you, thank you!! franki

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  10. I love looking through these and learning more about what I really love. I especially love the realizations about things I thought I loved, but realize I do not really love. Sometimes I look at a whole room and it's stunning because of the use of colors and scale, but when I look at items I like none of them. Does that make sense? (I realized this with the #5 dining room) I really don't know. There's a lot of beauty in this. My very favorite is the unexpected; the painted dresser.

    Love the Branca red, especially because it doesn't take over, but delights instead.

    The subdued and muted tones seem to hold my attention the most. They seem so welcoming and make me want to linger over them for a long time.

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  11. I like an evolved house—one that is personal. Hate the whole house done from a catalog look that looks staged not lived in. But I also agree that repeating colors throughout the house creates a sense of balance and rhythm. Not a fan at all of the one fabric for the whole house. When I saw that in HB, it gave me nightmares. So many beautiful fabrics in the world...and only one for this house? I like symmetry, but it can be a lazy trap. Loved that leopard is a color. I always called it my go to neutral!

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  12. I see the value in a decorator's touch, mainly, because I am clueless about my own house. HA! I love perusing over magazines and books of decor. However, when I bring home things my house looks piece-mealed and confused. I would love to work with a designer on fabric choices and paint colors. But, I have my own opinions, too, which might be annoying to a designer who is trying to do his/her thing...of which, I hired them to do! One thing is for certain, after the last 2 lessons on decorating, I have decided...I like fabric...I like blending fabrics...I prefer mixing fabrics that are solid, or have big, muted color stripes and a small floral accent print. EH...Now what?

    ~texassky

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  13. I prefer a house where all the rooms flow together with colors that coordinate throughout the house? + That being said if I can do the entire house in one swoop. Great photos. xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

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  14. Suzanne Rheinstein’s living room is the biz. Fantastic. There are so many other really good ideas here. Finally we are seeing designers using color.

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    1. it's gorgeous. my favorite - along with alessandra's.

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  15. Joni, I love this "drill" it down and really "see" the approach of each of the hands of the designers. It was the first time I actually took the time to see Alessandra Branca's work. Before I only gave it a first glance, and said, "OK, red." and moved on. But with this wonderful expose', I loved the layered, beautiful fabrics, and the warm, come sit and talk timeless but sophisticated arrangement of furniture. Very Italian Villa, charming. My favorite feel in a home, is less noticeable, but purposeful decorating without a pop of color. Suzanne Rheinstein or Amelia Handogan, neither are "current" only designer. And the luxury of one pattern decorating in Boxwood - YUM. I have always loved that pattern for a bedroom/bath. Bunny Williams nails it every time for flow, function and comfort of a space! You have given me a lot to think about, and a desire to really see my own home. Have you ever thought about expanding your work to "seeing" a space and helping the client manipulate their space into one of these design hands? Even long distance? :) I would like to sign up for that service! Laurie'

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  16. For today's open floor plans, it seems imperative to have some semblance of flow from one room to the other. A home should look well put together - not like one opened a crayon box for eight rooms. That said, I do admire Suzanne Rheinstein's living room except for the abundance of ties on the slipcovers that I find very distracting in viewing the over all composition of the room. The example of Bunny Williams' design is not one of her finest in my opinion. The living room is cluttered and looks more like an obstacle course than a room for gracious living.

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  17. I really want rooms to relate as you go through the house. In my own home I have a lot of white walls, warm floors and bright fun textiles. Most rooms have a touch of turquoise and pink, and I can take a cushion from any room and move it to another, and I do constantly. My only rule is to never buy prints from the same line because you end up with a bed in a bag look. OK, I lied, I have done that... but I try to be more eclectic. I love your posts. I finally have a friend as neurotically obsessed with her visual environment as I am! Love you, Joni!

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  18. Love all of the houses except the one decorated by Sommers. Sorry -- way too many fabrics and pillows and looks so choppy!

    Favorite photo was the last one -- charming, welcoming and so full of color and joy!

    One of your very best postings ever!!! Thanks for all of your hard work!

    Cheers! Jan at Rosemary Cottage

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  19. Love the vignette created by Rheinstein with the two enormous wing chairs and a lovely French, partner desk. However, it is just a lovely vignette because one could not push the chairs close enough to the desk to use the desk. The arms of chairs would damage the desk. Nice for a design magazine but not for those of us who design for real life.

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    1. Charlotte, I don't believe the desk was placed in the living room as a work station. If you examine the pictures, the chairs do work. The arms are not the problem, the seat height would be the problem. It's a beautiful vignette.

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    2. Hi Anon - It is difficult to tell from the photos which would hit the desk first ~ the cushion or the arms. The chairs are beautiful but do not work with the desk. And, it IS set up as a work station. Note the paper and pens on the desk.

      You and I both agree that it is a lovely vignette. My primary point was that these particular pieces do not work in real life. But then, do any of us really believe that these design homes or photos from magazines reflect real life? That is why people should not fret if their own homes do not live up to the standards set by these rooms. A wonderful exercise, however, to educate your eyes and to dissect each room to discover what you like and what you do not like.

      Smiles from My slice of Provence, Charlotte

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  20. I was grateful to read Ruthie Sommers has retired from decorating.

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  21. You write the best posts! I feel like so many of them are mini lessons and encourage me to really look and take notice of how rooms (and homes) are pulled together. While none of the above rooms are really my taste I do appreciate their beauty. We bought a new (to us) home 3 years ago and I have been slowly decorating it. I chose a palette based on a fabric I fell in love with and have used combinations of those colors in each of the 6 rooms on our first floor. I am shooting for a home where the rooms flow from one space to the next, but also look curated - I've been sitting with a sideboard I no longer like for 3 years now while I try to find the perfect piece to invest in. As someone who is not a designer, just an enthusiast, I've found having a set color palette helpful in keeping me focused while choosing items for our home. Regarding bedrooms, I've always lived in 2-story+ homes with the bedrooms separate from the living space which is why ours are decorated independently of the main living space.

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  22. I like a home to evolve, but with the same colors . I love that you can pull something from one space and add it to another and if works. When I was studying design it was taught, that a home should only have 3 colors, neutrals did not count as a color. I have followed that rule and it seems to work. Loved this post Joni. Thanks!

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  23. I like my home to flow without being too contrived. I'm a minimalist at heart.....my mantra has always been less is more, but I'm open to many styles with the exception of the House Beautiful examples. This is the very reason I dropped my subscription.......what am I not getting???? Joanie.....your style rocks, I love everything you do!

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  24. All these homes are beautiful and so well done. I do like a house that flows from room to room, I just think it looks more pulled together and elegant. But I don't like homes that are too sterile, too safe, too careful. I do like to do some layers on top of the basic flowing plan - and, these layers can change, be moved around, etc.. House #1 is my favorite - the use of red throughout is something my Aunt did in her home - from one room you could see to the other main rooms and that use of red (not too much) just moved you along. I do the same in my own home. And of course, Bunny Williams is a master at layering - I love most of her work, its never dull or boring and always classic, comfortable, and elegant. I don't like bland rooms, lifeless rooms, uncomfortable rooms and I prefer a pop of the same color somewhere in each room. Thanks for all these great pictures of beautiful rooms.

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  25. All of the rooms are fabulous...some of the standouts are the aubergine sofa, the old terra cotta floors, and the darling console table behind the chintz sofa in the garden room. If I had to choose between a pulled together "designer" home and an eclectic, acquired over time home, I would not be able to choose! Perhaps that is why I move furniture around more frequently that my volunteer workforce (husband and son) would prefer....just to keep things interesting. To add my two cents worth, though, I would have to say that the queen of pulling together haphazard colors, styles, eras, etc...into an astonishingly cohesive, livable, and just plain gorgeous whole has to be, hands down, Katie Ridder. Most designers have a look that can be reproduced with lots of thought if one is creative and artistic enough, but in my humble opinion, Katie Ridder cannot be imitated. By anyone else. Ever. (That'll be 2 cents please!)

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  26. Does anyone ever really finish decorating a room? Certainly not I. That's why I prefer an evolving look. I do however, try to make sure that rooms that open into one another have a sense of continuity between the rooms.

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  27. My favorite accessory is the dog in house # 3. Adorable!

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  28. I think Suzanne Rheinstein’s living room would not look good with the same striped fabric for curtains. I think a nice white with a touch of green undertone would work, though. The ones hanging there now seem too gold, at least in the first photo.

    And Amelia Handegan’s soft lilac bedroom is quite beautiful. I think I will use that as my inspiration room when I decorate my master suite. It’s soft without being fussy.

    Nice post Joni.

    ~ Angel

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  29. I want to live in Nicky Haslam's house. I'm in my early thirties and my budget is almost inconceivably limited, so it's lucky I like the slowly acquired over time look. I'm always jealous when you show a beautifully decorated house and note that it's for a young family. I want to be able to afford a designer and pretty, eclectic antiques.

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  30. Really interesting post Joni. I no longer subscribe to House Beautiful either it has totally lost its appeal for me. Love your personal style. Never cluttered just enough pillows in fact I LOVE the way you add velvet pillows in the mix. They add a bit of luxury to a casual space. I like Suzanne, Amelia, and Alexandra's work very much as well.

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  31. Dear Joni,

    Just beautiful! To me, you have the most inspirational and beautiful site on the internet(and believe me I have researched for many years). I really appreciate the hard work you have put into your design presentations. I have gained more inspiration from your site than any magazine or design book I have ever purchased(and I have bought a a lot). Also, the way you write keeps people interested. Your site is easy to read and the way you present your blog posts are easy on the eyes and organized. Anyone that reads your blog can actually gain something by looking at and reading it, without too many distracting advertisements and boxes to click on. I have applied a lot of your teachings to my own home. Your site is so professional and classy.....
    Thank you. Thank you. Thank you! Please don't change one thing about it.

    Sincerely,
    Debra F. from NC

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  32. House 3 -Bunny Williams... the dining room is a dream!!! I LOVE that dark circular table so much I want to marry it. Do you know where to find something like that?

    I am from Charleston and I have to admit of everything here, Amelia Handegan is my overall favorite. You mention that she is so popular people from all over the country hire her. I didn't realize designers would work out-of-town. Do you?

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  33. Also, how much would you say someone like Amelia Handegan cost? I suppose if I have to ask, I can't afford it. :\ But a person can dream.... and save.

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  34. Gorgeous!!!! Every angle of this room has beautiful interest and appeal and a comfortable welcoming feel! LOVE that fun blue chair and the rustic, animal themed accessories. Great work..
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  35. I like the idea that you share here and I hope there is a fresh idea that can be shared in the future
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  36. I am always learning from you, Joni! Thanks so much for all your research and hard work!

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  37. Love the vintage look and fabrics used for decorating.

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  38. They are all beautiful, but I can spot a Bunny Williams room in a heartbeat. That living room, and the kitchen are amazing, but I can tell a John Rosselli bed. Lovely. So homey. Nice piece, Joni.

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