19 June 2014

A Chair

In the last issue of Milieu magazine – there was a photograph of a room that I have become slightly obsessed with.  I just love everything about it and can’t quite put it out of my head.  It’s not a fancy room or a cluttered room – it’s very quiet and restful, as it should be because it’s a master bedroom. 

But it’s what is in the room that struck me.  It’s an Oriental chair.  No, not a French bergere – but an Oriental one – a Chinese elm chair to be specific.   Well, that’s shocking to me.   I usually only like to use Oriental items in design when it’s an accessory or an accent piece. 

 

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For instance – take this dining room filled with lovely antique Chinese elm chairs.  I wouldn’t even stop to look at this room – it is boring to me.  The chairs –so many of them - don’t excite me or engage my eye.  It’s just not my aesthetic.  To me – so many of this chair ruins the effect – they don’t even look special here.

 

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But look here instead – one Chinese elm chair – it looks so striking here in an Axel Vervoordt design.

 

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Or in this entry, with just two chinoserie styled chairs used as accents to flank a door –  suddenly the room comes alive with the use of the unusual.

 

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And again – a room filled with Chinoiserie chairs – it just bores.  The walls blend into the orange brown stain of the furniture – there is no contrast, no pop.

 

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But here, in a Bellacasa designed dining room – mixing Oriental chairs with English styled chairs – suddenly they look strikingly beautiful.  Their lines – slightly curved backs which are stark and contemporary – play against the straight lines of the windows in the curving bay, which plays against light fixture with both its straight and curved lines which plays against the curved lines of the table.  What could have been a boring space is instead a very pleasing one, one that settles and quiets the eye.

 

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The living room off the above dining room – with its long green velvet sofa is just a beautiful.

 

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Mimmi O’Connell is a genius at using Oriental designed furniture and accessories in her designs.   A designer in England, her rooms are filled with imported and antique Oriental furniture, which for years she sold at her shop called Port of Call.  She is known for mixing high and low – antiques sit next to common cotton fabrics like muslin and striped ticking.

 

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A study – with an Oriental bed – that doubles as a sofa in a library.  The bed sits next to an antique Chinese chair that Mimmi plumps with muslin covered cushions.

 

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Four Chinese chairs – their tall backs are sculptural.  Hard to imagine this room with any other chair.

 

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A bedroom – with a beautiful antique Oriental chair – I love these folding chairs.  Love the large mirrors on each side of the bed.  Just perfect!

 

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Here, an antique chest becomes a vanity.

 

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Vicente Wolf used these two Chinese chairs, mixed with an English antique styled sofa.

 

 

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Mary McDonald mixes Oriental chairs and a table in this family room.

 

 

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Ralph Lauren used a Japanese dining table as a coffee table.

 

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Suzanne Rheinstein also used an Oriental table as a coffee table.

 

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Alessandra Branca often uses Oriental styled armoires in her rooms.  Here she mixes it with an Oriental coffee table and a beautiful screen.  Despite the three large pieces – the room seems European in design, not Eastern.

 

 

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Michael Smith used two Japanese trunks as nightstands.

 

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And again – he used another Oriental chest and a table as coffee tables in this NYC apartment.  Gorgeous!!

 

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Oriental screens are very popular – here Rose Tarlow used this screen instead of a painting behind her sofa in her London apartment.  Or course – her screen is especially gorgeous.

 

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Suzanne Tucker used a screen, along with an Oriental table, in this living room. 

 

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In a chinoserie red library by Beverly Field – an Oriental styled chest on stand and coffee table – make interesting accent pieces.

 

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Jackye Lanham – used bamboo Oriental chests as side tables.

 

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And in this English styled living room – Amelia Handegan used a chinoiserie styled coffee table.

 

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Here, in a Belgian designed room – a lone antique Chinese chair again, becomes a piece of sculpture.

 

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And finally – this was the bedroom that started me thinking about these antique Chinese elm chairs.  I can honestly say that before this photograph – I had never once thought about these chairs as beautiful.  Now, I can’t understand why?  

Shown in the last issue of Milieu Magazine HERE, this bedroom by Shannon Bowers would not leave my mind.  I just think it is fabulous – it’s quiet, serene and exactly what a master bedroom should look like.  I love the Bennison Roses in Gray – it’s probably my favorite fabric.  I love the linens on the bed – simple and perfectly tailored.  I am obsessed over them – the long cover that falls just perfectly at the corners.  I love the lamps and the fabric shades – which is a bit of a trademark of Bowers.  I love the antique prints over the bed – in shades of gray which match the fabric. 

 

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But it’s the choice of the Oriental chair at the wood desk that brings a certain contemporary vibe to the room.  On the left, you can see an antique French bergere, but for the space against the windows – the bare wood chair looks fabulous, especially with the simple desk.

 

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As they say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.  Could you recreate this bedroom, but on a budget?  Here’s a few items I found to furnish.

 

 

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Pottery Barn – Upholstered Bed

This is a good copy and reasonably priced.

Pair of Early 20th Century Chinese Chair -SATURDAY SALE-

Pagoda Red – two antique Chinese chairs for under $1000 – Here $500 for a chair is not cheap, I know.  BUT, I was surprised – these style chairs really aren’t readily available in reproductions.  If you want this, you probably will have to buy an antique.  $500 for a chair like this is very reasonable – some were over $2000.  I wouldn’t use a different style just to save on this – it would be better to find an antique that is on sale.

 

The hardest item to copy is the Bennison fabric.  At over $200, Bennison is out of reach for most of us.

 

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I found this linen fabric at Lee Jofa that would substitute nicely for the Bennison.

 

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From Calico Corner, this fabric is much less than both the Bennison and the Lee Jofa too.  Though not floral, it has the light, airy feel that the Bennison Roses in Gray does.

In the end, one bedroom – with a Chinese chair – opened up a new world to me.   It has reminded me to keep my eyes open when I read through magazines – probably much too quickly these days.   Even though I am sure of my aesthetic, I am finding that recently new things are catching my eye, things that I have dismissed before.

Are you finding yourself liking new things you have never even noticed before???

83 comments:

  1. Thank you Joni for such a great post! I guess I had never really thought of bringing in such a structural element into an otherwise 'soft' room ... but wow! What an easy and inexpensive way (or as expensive as you want, I guess) to bring in much needed interest ... definitely got this fellow Houstonian thinking out of the box today! Hope you have a lovely day.

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  2. Joni, you hit it out of the park...AGAIN! Great post!!

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  3. This is interesting. I have 10 Chinese kids, but very little Chinese in my house-only a few pictures. I do like the way they just added a touch, but doubt I will ever use any. It is too complicated for me. I'll have to stay with "your" original taste.

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    1. ten children? wow! you make it sound as if you might have adopted them - you don't say you are Chinese or your husband? either way - wow, you are so blessed!!!!!!

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  4. So radical Joni!! So you approve of "Oriental" furniture now. As long as it knows it's place of course. Hopefully, soon, all of the ladies who decorate in Houston will have an "oriental" piece or two to keep up with Milieu! Lovely pics, by designers with talent. Unfortunately, the post was silly. Joni, I like your blog, but really it's becoming tiresome. We understand, you want to breakout from the style you've worshiped and followed for years, it's tired and it's passe, but honestly this just sounded stupid. Chinese antiques are considered classics in design, that doesn't mean that you fill an entire room with them (as you so aptly pointed out) but then you shouldn't really be doing that with anyone thing, including "French" (style) furniture.

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    1. I'm sure Joni gives a flying ef what you think.

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    2. I'm sure she does actually. This is a business she's running. Insightful comment, though.

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    3. I didn't find the post silly at all, and enjoyed the commentary on a personal design epiphany. What Joni excels at is finding interesting topics to discuss, presented in a wonderful tone of voice, with lots of glorious photos. What is tiresome, however, is a patronizing, more-sophisticated-than-thou, know-it-all schtick ... which doesn't impress as much as you might imagine.

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    4. Why is it necessary to be hurtful? Joni offers her time and illustrates her interests. If you don't like it don't read it but don't be hurtful.

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    5. Well - I've been writing on design - from my perspective - for 8 years now. I started out as a lark - something for fun for my best friend and me. Back then, there were very, very few design blogs. It doesn't get easier over time, it gets harder to find topics because you can't keep repeating. When I find something that interests me personally, I will usually talk about it. If you don't care for my opinion - then just move on. It doesnt hurt my feelings at all. I would rather you be happy in your blog reading than not.

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    6. Why don't you write your own blog, if you have so much that's so interesting to say? I don't see you posting regularly on all sorts of topics---if you do, please include a link. Until then, and until you put as much work and thought into your posts as Joni does, I don't think you have a right to criticize.

      Signed---a fellow Houstonian who resents your constant jibes at Houston and its citizens. Jealous much?

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    7. Anon. 7:40, I haven't see any flying "efs" for a while. Could it be they are on the endangered species list or perhaps climate change is having an adverse effect on "efs" much like it has on your latent development.

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    8. Joni asked whether we were finding ourselves attracted to things outside of what we consider our aesthetic. This is a good question, and the post illustrates it perfectly. Also extremely helpful is her sourcing of substitutes that can create a beautiful look for much less money. I personally find that I keep changing as I learn, and to dismiss something as not my style is becoming less common with me. I thought I didn't like modern, but certain modern pieces really speak to me. I thought I liked everything serene, but certain rooms that really mix it up with a lot of color look beautiful to me, and I've even done a little of that in one small room of my house, using a vibrant Moroccan rug and art covering the walls. Mostly I like restraint, but sometimes an unrestrained room hits the perfect note. On the other hand, I see pictures of rooms, such as the one on page 49 of the current issue of Traditional Home, that so violate my sense of color and beauty that I can't imagine ever changing my mind about them. (It's the chairs and the curtains, as well as the touches of fuschia, in conjunction with the wallpaper that make me cringe.) So Joni, this was a good post. Thanks!

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  5. Joni, I really loved this post. It beautifully illustrates how one piece can add fresh excitement to a design. I LOVE the chair and Shannon Bower's design is a gorgeous example- so lovely! There is a store "Material Culture" near Phila that sells these types of chairs (along with many other interesting pieces) at very reasonable prices. Here is a link for their web site:
    http://materialculture.com/store/tour-the-store/#prettyPhoto[postimages]/11/

    xo
    Mimi @ A House Romance

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    1. That is great - thanks! there are stores like that in Houston - one is called the Room Store, i believe. the lines are important in the repros though. you want a tall back, but not too tall.

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  6. I'm really loving Mileu magazine and hope eventually to see more frequent publishings of it. This reminds me to renew my subscription too!

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  7. "Something" oriental in design in every room has always worked for me! franki

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  8. Hey Joni!
    You know, the furniture store: ARHAUS, which may not be southern, has amazing super high back reproductions of the chairs for $400. They call them their Ming Burn Chair, take a look. They'd be great in a room with super high ceilings, flanking an entry table, etc..

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    1. yes. but those chairs are 72 inches tall - they are huge. but - they have the same form. thanks!

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  9. Beautiful pictures! i like the fabric from Calico Corners better than the Bennison or the Lee Jofa. I went to the Calico Corners website but couldn't find it--do you know who it is by?

    Nancy

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    1. http://www.calicocorners.com/p-7685-lille-linen.aspx this is the link to the fabric.

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  10. Joni, I love your posts for the photos and the way they inspire and make me reflect on things. You have no idea how much you've influenced my decor, from French/Swedish style to craving more colour/pattern ... and now this. I lived in Asia for six years and had a house full of beautiful furniture and objects. And then one day (2005), I just got tired of it and put everything into storage. Lately I started thinking about some of the items again, and how/whether I wanted to introduce some of the buddhas/chairs/tables/cabinets into my French/Swedish mix ... and voila, your post appears with loads of inspirational photos and ideas. Pretty amazing and very much appreciated.

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    1. go for it!!! send a picture when you add the pieces to your rooms!

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  11. I agree, a lovely bedroom. I love the sculptural quality of the Chinese elm chair, but it doesn't look in the least comfortable!

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    1. hahah - no, it doesn't. but - sometimes straight chairs are oddly comfortable. i'll have to try it out somewhere

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  12. Fun post...I've always thought an asian chair or two added an exotic element.
    This post was also in my inbox this morning... thought you might like.

    http://homeanddelicious.blogspot.com/2014/06/travel-lets-go-to-lyon-ii.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HomeAndDelicious+%28Home+and+Delicious%29

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  13. Interesting post--as always. I find rooms with a 'collected' look most appealing--regardless of pedigree. These rooms are beautiful examples.

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  14. Joni, I have never posted before but I am a HUGE fan of your blog. Your posts are so well researched, your photos are gorgeous, and I appreciate the many many hours it must take you to put these little gems together. Thank you!

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  15. http://www.calicocorners.com/p-7685-lille-linen.aspx here is the link!

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  16. A little Oriental goes a long way in design. I love S. Rheinstein's coffee table for instance, but many of the other pieces shown in this post begin to look like they literally just came off a boat from China and the paint is not yet dry. Very cheap looking to say the least. A well selected piece can be elegant, but rooms full of the Orient not so much.

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  17. Something interesting to consider. Thanks for the inspiration. You chose great examples to illustrate your point. Can't wait to sit down with the new issue of Milieu.
    Also a big thank you for the post on Fixer Uppers - love!

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  18. I absolutely love this post! One of my favorites ever! I have always loved Chinoiserie, and have used it in every single house I have ever done! Honestly!
    You have found the most beautiful examples! The lacquer chests, the screens and all of those elements are elegant, authentic and beautiful!
    Anonymous 12:27 I am sure has seen a ton of the "duplications" of those items; which is a shame! (it is hard to see in a magazine photo)!



    I would like to make a suggestion (not at all a criticism)! "Oriental" is a term used for antique (and maybe some new) rugs! Not for antique furniture from China, Japan, etc. The funny thing is that virtually no "Oriental rug is from those countries! Turkey, Persia, and the region have been making hand made rugs for thousands of years....

    The Coromandel screens, lacquer chests, the beautiful painted pigskin trunk (under the table) , and porcelain and fabric patterns involving "Chinese" people are called "Chinoiserie". They were made to import to the European countries. They are not used in China; so when you said that one room looked "European, not "Asian"; your instincts were "right on"!! They are indeed, European!

    I also must say that every single one of the "Chinoiserie" pieces you showed are fine, true antiques by those excellent decorators.
    Also, the reason that you see so many of these "coffee tables" is because there is no such thing as a "real antique" coffee table that is American or English, or European"!!

    Those low long tables that make perfect coffee tables are made that height for The Chinese and Japanese who sit on the floor for tea! (they also have other uses)!

    I have seen way too many beautiful antique "tea tables" cut down by Americans to make "

    coffee tables!"
    One of my very favorite item of "Chinoiserie" (entirely for the European trade) is hand-painted Chinese wallpaper!

    And all my favorite porcelain is "Chinese export" which is why it was called that! It was for export!!

    Thank you for the best post ever! (oh, they are all soooo good!

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    1. Great information. Thanks Penelope!

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    2. I agree and disagree slightly. "Chinoiserie" was made for the European market and there are lots of great examples above. "Oriental" is indeed used to describe carpets, since when importation first commenced, anything east of Europe was loosely "the orient". However, there's still a large amount of furniture to be labelled, and the easiest way to label them is "oriental" or "Asian". A lot of the furniture Asians used for themselves is now part of the antique market: the Chinese chairs above, Tibetan chests, lacquered or wooden cabinets, alter tables, low tables, Burmese manuscript chests, and various objects (buddhas, paintings, bronze or ceramic vessels, etc.). They are not "Chinoiserie" which has a very distinctive look (half Asian, half European, finer, more decorative), and many refer to them simply as oriental.

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    3. I'm sure you meant altar tables, not alter tables

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  19. Oriental was never one of my favorite design elements until I discovered how much I love chinoiserie! Every piece I've bought for my antiques shop usually ends up staying right at home with me! Beautiful post, Joni! And I sure love seeing your precious Cavaliers on Instagram! I sure do love my Rosie girl!

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  20. You asked if anyone suddenly likes something they had not considered so much before.....the answer is YES. When people come to dinner, the conversation has strayed to the topic of decorating.......it is surprising how many want to sweep out what they have and start anew......I think when the Great Recession started, everyone was hanging on to what they had, but now many are ready to change out, looking for a breath of "fresh"...."fresh" is different in each area of the country, I think. Also, I live in areas where people came to "retire" (Okay, make that play golf, ski, etc.), and some folks are wistful for pieces of furniture they left "up north" or "back east"....wishing they had brought various items with them, but really, colonial and/or smaller furniture just doesn't work in huge, high-ceilinged rooms. Love your blog and always enjoy reading it!

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    1. What a terrific observation! Bravo! Be careful what you "sweep out"!!

      Fresh can be just rearranging your furniture! Changing where the paintings and artwork hang! Stick with what you LOVE!!

      That is the secret! Also.....buy the book: "One Man's Folly"! Study it!

      It is all about what means something to you......and arranging and rearranging!!

      This is the best book EVER! (I must won 2,000 decorating books!)

      Penelope

      ps I have no monetary connection. Just buy this book! It will be sold out soon!!!

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    2. oh dear! I did not "won" them! I "own" them! You know.......

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  21. lacy phillips designsJune 19, 2014 at 8:10 PM

    Love the post and love that bedroom too! Thanks, Joni!

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  22. In the previous centuries, "Chinoiserie" was considered for the select few that had the means to acquire exotic pieces from far away. Now, stuff made in China is everywhere, from Wal-Mart to You Name It. Chinese goods have become synonym to low quality and mass production. Even if these chairs are authentically made in China, I think I'll skip.

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    1. Good advice! The things to look for (if you are interested; are the authentic "Chinoiserie" things.....in antique stores; estate sales......searching....for the old stuff!) You will not run into them anywhere else!

      No surprises!!

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  23. Beautiful eye candy as always! Off to check out the fabrics now :o)
    ~Des

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  24. Wonderful oriental design, I love the oriental screen the most! It's so beautiful. Thanks :D

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  25. Replies
    1. One of our cherished pieces is an antique coromandel screen we have mounted on our entry as you come in.
      The brickyard red is chippy and some of the jade and ivory inlays have little age nicks but the patina and warmth it adds is wonderful
      In a room mixed with French antiques and soft squashy upholstery.
      Read Mark Hampton's book on decorating, has a whole chapter devoted to Chinoisserie.
      Thanks Joni
      Kris in Seattle

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    2. Lucky you! And a great reference to Mark Hampton's book!

      He was one of the Best of the BEST!

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    3. To: Faheem Zia June 20, 2014 at 3:21 AM
      GOMI.
      Sheila

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    4. "And a great reference to Mark Hampton's book! He was one of the Best of the BEST!"

      No he wasn't. Hampton did an obedient take on Rich People Decor, but he was not an original talent; no one who is well educated in decorating believes he is.

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  26. I love this post. I am not a designer, just a regular person who appreciates your beautiful taste. Where could I find a Japanese table I could use as a coffee table? As someone commented previously, antique coffee tables don't exist. A less expensive reproduction would be best. Thanks, you are my favorite blog in any category.

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  27. Fun post! I don't usually care for this style, but the rooms you featured make me think a little differently. I love the Ralph Lauren room and have never thought about it having the oriental/antique coffee table until you pointed it out. I actually like almost all of the rooms, which I think means I like a few oriental/antique pieces. I do love the chairs you featured. And yes, from these comments, I find that from time to time, I like seemingly like something out of character for me. Thanks for expanding my list of design choices.

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  28. What great looking chairs and table! They look both stylish and comfortable, both of which are things that I guess most people are looking for in a chair purchase. The overall space looks really good, too!
    Round Dining Table

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  29. I think the boring rooms don't have a sense of balance. They are boring for reasons other than using all the same chair. I have seen this chair used en masse to good effect before.
    Paula
    Mise en scène

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  30. Joni: Thanks as always for a provocative post! You always make your readers think, reconsider, reevaluate and that's one of the things I love best about your blog. My style is always evolving and I love that you are discussing this issue--to change or not to change? Many thanks for your thoughtful and well researched posts. Debbie in Houston

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  31. You asked about liking new things. My style evolution has gone from (1) "I have some Baker furniture but really don't know what I'm doing", to (2) living in Asia with Asian antiques and Indonesian teak, to (3) living in Houston and shopping at Marburger fair and Pottery Barn, to (4) finally getting the difference between "flea market" and "antique" and getting rid of the junk, to (5) having a lovely, serene home with Swedish/French painted antiques and pared down accessories, to (5) getting a little bored. I'm longing for a little more colour and pattern and some wood pieces. The truth is I love interior decoration and could live with a number of different styles. Thus I fully expect my taste to keep evolving over the years. The only constant is that the older I get, the more I want to reduce (downsize houses, reduce clutter) and live with fewer but better things.

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  32. Hi Joni, Being a chair addict, I know exactly what you are talking about. I think that the reason you find some of the Chinese-STYLE chairs boring is that they are new and have not acquired the soul that only comes with age and use. Your favorite chairs are often refer to as Chinese Scholar's Hat Chairs--they are my favorites. I love the super old ones the best--this form goes back to the Ming dynasty. Yep, I agree chairs (the best ones) are sculpture. Hope that you are having a wonderful summer. xoxo Mary

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  33. In the late 70's, I took a decorating course - a small group of us met once a week for about 12 weeks. The elegant older woman that taught this class (in her home) was well know in our area for her interior design work and she also owned a high end boutique type furniture store. She also was very well connected to curtain makers and upholsterers. I was young, broke, and always stopping by her store to browse - I couldn't buy a thing. We became friendly and she invited me to take her course for free! She was just great and her course was so interesting - I learned so much from her. She "preached" CHINOISERIE . She thought it was imperative to have a Oriental something in every main room of the house. In her house I saw the little Oriental table, a small antique bamboo chair somewhere else - just a touch. Her rooms looked English Country with this slight hint of Oriental. I admit, at first I kind of passed over it - I thought it was her quirky thing maybe - I mean we are in Southern IL here. My mother and my grandmother had NOTHING Oriental. But as I studied more about design over the years I really started to get it. I have some blue & white porcelain, a small chest, an old print, some antique little slippers - a little bit here, there - not much. I would love one of those chairs! I also always wanted a great big beautiful antique painted Oriental cabinet - dream. Now, 35 years after taking those classes taught by that lovely, nice, talented lady - I truly do understand what she was saying - she was so knowledgeable. It took a while but I got it.

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    1. WOW!!! Lucky you!

      Those people are few and far between! I am delighted you found her........and she found an audience!

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  34. Oh, I would love that chair if it was an antique. It is true - the antique Oriental things are the good things. The new - not so good. You asked what we are liking now. Well, its not new but I find myself looking at American antiques again. Especially the things like antique weathervanes, huge crocks, wooden furniture - farm tables. Yes, I know, we already did that thing! But for some reason I am seeing it in a new way lately. A piece here and there - not a roomful!

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    1. Cue me, running away screaming, "Noooo!"
      Sheila

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    2. Well, I think you have to have the taste, knowledge, and ability to see some things in a completely new and different light. Its not for everyone though.

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    3. Re: Market Décor June 22,2014 at 6:48 PM
      Well, ouch, ouch, and ouch.
      Sheila

      Delete
  35. Balance your spiritual energy and get in harmony with your soul by practicing these Radha-Krishna meditations.


    Sri Gita Govinda
    -A book written in the 12th century, this is a description of the intimate loving affairs of Radha and Krishna
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/keqr4lqp7wr1rru/Sri_Gita_Govinda.pdf

    Govinda Lilamrta
    -An 400 year old book which poetically describes the eternal daily pastimes of Radha and Krishna
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/uhcuigauc6uqiei/Govinda_Lilamrita.pdf

    Ananda Vrindavan Campu
    -This is probably the most poetic and intimate portrayal of Sri Krsna’s life in Vrndavana that has ever been written.
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/k9j3ldwbt17be3b/Ananda_Vmdavana_Campu.pdf

    Prayers of Service to Radha and Krishna (Sankalpa Kalpadruma)
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/lvkqsro3sbzm249/Visvanath_Cakravarti_Thakur_Sankalpa_Kalpadruma.pdf

    Prema Samputa The Treasure Chest of Love
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/mpbncdyt97nw0x7/Prema_Samputa_The_Treasure_Chest_of_Love.pdf


    And the following four are taken from Visvanath Cakravarti's Camatkara Candrika, a 300 year old scripture that talks about the love meeting of Radha and Krishna:

    The Meeting in the Box
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/c81a7cp43n5v6aj/The_Meeting_in_the_Box.pdf

    The Meeting of Sri Krishna Disguised as a Female Doctor
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/hgomrnem7829pda/The_Meeting_of_Sri_Krsna_Disguised_as_a_Female_Doctor.pdf

    The Meeting of Sri Krishna Disguised as a Female Singer
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/gyuboduhn8dvdml/The_Meeting_of_Sri_Krsna_Disguised_as_a_Female_Singer.pdf

    The Meeting of Sri Krishna Disguised as Abhimanyu
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/911h9qoxn4ca027/The_Meeting_of_Sri_Krsna_Disguised_As_Abhimanyu.pdf


    And lastly, we have the supreme scripture which describes the 24 hour daily loving affairs of Radha and Krishna in Vrindavan, called Bhavanasara Sangraha. This book is now available on Amazon for Kindle, for only $3.49

    http://www.amazon.com/Bhavanasara-Sangraha-Mahanidhi-Swami-ebook/dp/B00CW9H4DI/ref=la_B00J2M5LAQ_1_15?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1402209195&sr=1-15

    Here is a 41 page sample of Bhavanasara Sangraha:
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    Replies
    1. What is this nonsense? Doesn't belong here.
      Sheila

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  36. I enjoyed the post, Joni. Thank you for raising my awareness, as usual. One thing that seems to have gone unmentioned -- the lovely, thin black window trim in the photos in the beginning of the post. They strike me as a bit oriental -- a bit like calligraphy. Very pretty in their daintiness.

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  37. Dear Joni, this post is gorgeous as ever! I enjoyed it so much. Thank you!

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  38. Yes, I have found myself opening my eyes to other styles or things that I previously thought I disliked. My apartment is a mix of Houston Style (slipcovered chairs, sofas and ottomans) and rustic French-style tables/desks. The first time I saw those white Moroccan, messy-looking rugs I didn't like them at all but now I'm thinking of buying one! I also really disliked the steel frame windows when they first appeared but now I love them. I will always keep my Houston/French style base but am open to more styles now. I would definitely buy an egg chair if I could afford one for instance which is strange since 1950s/1960s decor is my least favourite ever.

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    Replies
    1. Tee hee! We who did not like the "50's" in the 50's; don't like it now either! It is all the rage in Los Angeles! Oh well......Taste always wins out.....even if it is in the tiny minority!!

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    2. Penelope, you are commenting too much again. Please go tend to your allegedly "busy" decorating business.

      Delete
  39. For me, the singular chair in the room looks like sculpture while a whole set of them under a table in the dining room are just ugly chairs that I hate. Weird, huh? I guess too much really is just too much. Love Chinese Chippendale though.
    Sheila

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  40. TERRIFIC POST, JONI . . . THANK YOU!

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  41. I had always love oriental design. This post is awesome. Thanks.

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  42. My home design is East meets West as I am half Pacific Islander . I have collected Asian antiques for years and include something from the East in each room. That said, I enjoy the eclecticism and uniqueness that is my home. I believe our rooms are a reflection of ourselves. Our desires and interests. , When guests come to visit they enjoy my home and its treasures and that gives me joy. Beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder. While I admire many designers as their signature "looks" I prefer to forge my own path.

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  43. Joni...

    I own two of these beautiful Chinese "Officials Chairs". Mine are also elm with arms and woven wood seats. Very old; they are documented late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and I have had them for about 12 years now. Their form reminds me of Queen Anne chairs and may have influenced that form when trade with the East opened up to the West back in the day.

    They are a simple chair. Mine are beautifully designed mortar-and-tenon construction and just as sturdy now as when they were when first built. A matched set, I got them rather inexpensively because one has an old wound on one side: someone got a little too close to the fire and it is scorched there. It adds a lot to the character! Like you have discovered, they are very sculptural and one doesn't need a table full of them to appreciate them. In a white room, with softly-coloured furnishings, they add a lot of punch.

    Officials Chairs are a popular design and continued to be made well into the 20th C...which is why they are easy to find and relatively inexpensive. In fact, China is still manufacturing them. New chairs in Chinese woods are still found there (my Daughter lives in China). As with any antique from anywhere, know what you are looking for when buying an old chair. I have enjoyed others discovering the beauty of Chinese furniture forms. To me, they add something to Western design because the earlier chairs, tables, and so on tend to be very minimal; pared down to their essence. BTW, I loved the Summer issue of "Milieu". It's about the only magazine I still subscripe to!

    Laura.

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  44. Hi Joni ~ Enjoyable as usual. Variety is the spice of life as they say. I think at one time "they" also said "If you can't say something nice....." I enjoy your posts so much but between the anonymous haters who are bored (apparently) and the rare ones who think it is THEIR blog to respond to each of your commentors.....sometimes I wonder why you don'tjust dispense with the comment section entirely. Then I realize that you are SMART and FAIR and GOOD and you don't let the follies of the few interfere with the fun of the many. Thanks for that....Thanks for that as much as for a great blog.....Where you find the energy and the patience and the temperance....well, that's a good topic for an upcoming post!

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  45. Any idea why YOUR BLOG POSTS ARE NOT BENG DELIVERED TO SOME OF OUR INBOXES VIA EMAIL? It seems to have been going on for several weeks. Do you know if it's on your end or the receiving end? I sure do miss seeing these in my box ~

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  46. Nice one! I'm not really a fan of oriental chair design but i found that the designs that's featured in your blog post is wonderful. Thanks.

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  47. Your blog is amazing! thank you so much for your creative inspirations and thank you for sharing. Please visit http://goo.gl/sS87hD

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  48. Great post Joni! In my very early 20's many years ago I moved to Houston and was lucky to stumble upon the best boss and friend ever -- a single guy with incredible style. He lived in a very cool Montrose town home and when I visited his home for the first time I was amazed to see a a beautiful collection of original moderns - Eames chairs, a Barcelona black leather couch, lucite side tables and all anchored by a beautiful red lacquered and inlaid Chinese table that he used as a buffet. It was a quick lesson in WOW and one I never forgot. I can't afford original designer pieces at that level but every room in my home now has just a bit of the Orient in it and I agree Joni - it makes the environment so much more interesting. Thanks again for reminding me of that early lesson! best, linda

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  49. Awesome interior designing and interior furnishing!

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