COTE DE TEXAS: Trends for 2016 – Do You Care?

Trends for 2016 – Do You Care?

 
Here it comes again – so fast!  Every year we get a list of what’s in and what’s out in interior design.  The problem is, trends in interior design don’t quite follow the one year rule.  Instead, it’s more of a five to ten year cycle in trends.  I started writing this blog almost 9 years ago – and I have to say, that since that time, there has been a huge shift in design.  Huge – which proves the 10 year time period.

The past ten years have shown a major change in how we buy furniture, where we buy furniture – and all the choices we have today that we didn’t have those ten years ago.

I remember when you couldn’t just go buy a French chair.  It had to be an antique.  Or, you had to order a reproduction from a design center, through a decorator. When I wanted a set of French caned chairs for my dining room, it such an ordeal to find it at an affordable price.    Since then…French chairs are now available everywhere, even at Target or Cost Plus.  And, when things are available everywhere, you look for the next new thing.

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French chair, in linen, at Cost Plus, for just $160!!! HERE 

It is generational too.  The old saying goes…if you wore it before, you shouldn’t wear it again.  For me, that is mini skirts and highwaisted bellbottom jeans – two things I will never wear again.  But on my daughter, those highwaisted bellbottom pants look fresh and young and chic.  The same goes for furniture.  I grew up in Meyerland, in the 60s, where all the houses were modern wannabes.  We had an original Tulip table and chairs with orange cushions.  We had an yellow shag area rug in the living room.  Over the table was a round, glass pendant light.    Does that explain my love of French design?  I”m never going back to mid century, although the next generation can’t get enough of it.  In fact, my daughter bought a Saarinen look alike table for her own apartment, and it looks good, age appropriate, trendy.

 
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Copies of the Saarinen table come in all different sizes – at Amazon!  HERE.

Ageism.  I’m feeling it.  I look at the new design trends in magazines and they look so fresh.   And while I appreciate the new trends, I don’t know if I really want to decorate in a way that appeals to a 20-or 30-something.  It’s confusing.  But, is there a way to update a 2005 look for 2020 without throwing out everything you own? 
I talked about my confusion with another designer and he said – be true to your look.  After all, aren’t all the greats true to their aesthetic – and we don’t expect them to update their look.  Charles Faudree and Dan Carithers never changed their aesthetic.  And neither has Bunny Williams or Charlotte Moss.  And certainly Rachel Ashwell has never changed a wit.  Consider the great Miles Redd, who is thought of as one of the best in the U.S. – he is a classic decorator and never really changes.  No trends for him, but he keeps it all fresh and new somehow – and he attracts both the younger and the older clients.

 
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Miles Redd, staying true to his aesthetic.
 
Of course, some designers do change and update their look.

 
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I remember when it first hit me that things were changing, that the “Houston look” was on its last legs.  Pamela Pierce, the innovative Houston designer, moved to a gorgeous older house in a most wonderful neighborhood that’s a short walk from the museums, a location that most of us would kill for.  Her house was filled with fabulous European antiques, Belgian and French with a bit of Swedish – all covered in a rare linen (see above.)    But, one day, at an antique shop which she frequented – I heard whispers that Pam was through with that linen.  Done.  Ready to move on.  And I knew.  It was over.   When Veranda showed her new decor, it was truly the death knell.   Things were changing and no one had told Restoration Hardware.  Yet. 

 
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Pierce’s new look was still monochromatic – all white now, but it was updated in a most brilliant way.   I was resistant at first, but today, I look at this and think…genius.   I love this.   This is how it’s done.  It doesn’t have to be about bright colors and Sputniks.  It doesn’t have to be floral fabrics or gold accessories to look new and innovative.   But, back in 2012, who knew that things were going to change so much and so fast?

The sea change was easy, facilitated by how cheaply furniture was now, and how available it was – thanks to stores like Pottery Barn and catalogues like Ballards.   Cheap furniture encouraged a throwaway society. You want a house filled with new furniture?  No problem.

 
Take Mid Century designs, once every garage store and resale shop were filled with cheap, unwanted furniture that baby boomers grew up with.  Suddenly, a  market for these designs grew  - discovered by a younger generation that had never lived with contemporary before.  Prices rose.  Enter Design Within Reach and then, West Elm, with affordable prices and now contemporary furniture is more popular than ever.

 
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West Elm sells contemporary – at reasonable prices HERE.
 
The change from the “Houston Look” or the “Belgian Look” was lightening fast.  Was it all that long ago when I wrote about Restoration Hardware and their faux antiques, with the exposed burlap?  Remember how we all laughed at that!   But obviously there was a market for it – just three years ago!!

  
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Restoration Hardware’s Deconstructed Antiques – this ad was from 2012!!    How quickly things have changed!  No one would buy this furniture today and pity the fools that did.   But, don’t cry for Restoration Hardware just yet.

Have you seen their new line - Restoration Hardware Modern?  Have you seen what they are selling today?  Have our tastes changed so quickly, in just 3 and 4 years?  And how long will this look last?  When will it look as tired and boring as their faux antiques do today?  Care to guess?

 
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Today, look at Restoration Hardware Modern, or RHM – this is their modern take on the sectional with accent chairs and brass tables.  Of course there are lamps and art work and rugs to complete the look.

 
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The oh so trendy navy tufted velvet look – ala RHM.  Notice how they stage it in an French mansion.  Hint, hint:  this contemporary look will be fabulous in your classic house!

 
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This table is gorgeous.  It really is.  Seriously beautiful.  But you have to have the house for it.  This isn’t going to fit in a remodeled ranchburger.  It needs the architecture.  Do enough people have the right architecture to buy this furniture?  We’ll see.  I know we’ve all predicted the demise of RH for years now, but forget it.  No one does it like them.   No one.

 
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OMG.  This desk is gorgeous.  Gorgeous!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 
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I love the sconces.   And the hardware.  Imagine walls of white marble, like shown here – with this vanity.  New with old.  
Restoration Hardware Modern, or RHM, is so on trend, for now.  Cerused wood, tufting in navy, brass, gold, Sputniks.  Have they missed a detail?  Doesn’t look like it to me.

So….I’m depressed now.  Even if I could afford that desk, where would I put it?  I would have to move if I bought it.  Or totally remodel my house.  No matter how much I love this desk, I will never own it.
  I don’t have the house for it, or the energy to create one.

And while this look is so hot right now, does everyone like it?  Are there holdouts?

Yes.

For sure this contemporary look doesn’t appeal at all to the legions of fans of HGTVs biggest stars – Joanna and Chip Gaines from Waco.  Yes, Waco Texas, the hottest design mecca in the United States right now.  Don’t laugh.  The Gaines own HGTV.  They are beyond popular, they are GODS.

 
Some years ago, the Gaines started renovating houses – on the cheap, in Waco.  I mean, you can buy a decent house in Waco for $100,000.  For another $100,000 – the Gaines will create for you a completely new, fabulous country house – with shiplap walls.  HGTV came calling and in two years, the Gaines become the face of affordable design when their show blew up and exploded over everyone else on Television.  Joanna & Chip became megastars, with their own furniture line, their own design center in Waco called “The Silos,” their own Bed & Breakfast for the scores of the devoted who have traveled to Mecca, and a bakery.  They don’t say Joanna is the next Martha Stewart for no reason.  She is. 

But – their countrifried look is nothing like Restoration Hardware Modern or the contemporary look found in every magazine.  The Gaines’ aesthetic is the complete opposite:

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Magnolia House.  The new B&B that Joanna & Chip Gaines opened in Waco for their customers who are flocking to visit their design center, The Magnolia Silos.  The number of devotees to the Gaines look can’t be understated.  They are hugely successful, wildly so and the owners of HGTV are probably thanking their lucky stars that they signed them.

 
 
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Above is Joanna’s typical look, her aesthetic is nothing at all what the popular design magazines show.   Do Americans suffer from design bipolar disease?  Does one half like contemporary/mid century modern while the other half prefer the cozy, warm country look? 

So, for now, let’s look at how design forward American’s are decorating their houses and what the trends are for 2016. 
 

Floors:

One of the biggest trends is flooring -   light French oak planks, cerused.  I knew this was a huge trend when on Million Dollar Realtors of Los Angeles, uber realtor Josh Flagg walked into a newly refurbished $15 million home and proclaimed, “French Oak Cerused floors, of course.”

 
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Cerused.  French oak with either lime or wax applied to the grain.  This house in Milieu was totally done in the light tones, from ceiling to floor to door.

 
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Light floors, limed finished, and Cerused floors are everywhere.  Suddenly black floors look tired and dated.
 
 
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The light look is the trend of the year and probably the decade.

 
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Can’t redo your floors?  Bring in the look with a piece of furniture, like this dining room table.

 
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If these hardwoods were dark – it wouldn’t look so “today.”
 
 
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Light beams.  Can’t redo your dark floors?  Cover with a light area rug.

 
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The cabinets match the floor and the island.  The range becomes the accent color.

 
 
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Careful!  Just be sure to go with a gray/blue undertone, not yellow/orange.

 
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Can’t replace the stain, paint!  These floors are painted.  Designer/blogger Lauren Liess just painted her floors like this and they look great.  This idea is worrying me to death - I know I should do this myself!!! 

 
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Cerused - in black.   Chic.

 
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Wood?  No, it’s tile.  This faux wood tile is exploding in popularity.  I keep noticing tile that looks like wood being put in remodeled/flipped houses.

 
Bronze/Brass/Gold:

These warm metals are really beyond trend at this point.  Hardware is another item that people never used to change before.  It was what it was.  Now, with the advent of the availability – from Home Depot to Restoration Hardware – hardware is disposable.  Tired of chrome? Just change it out.   I’m keeping mine though, I just changed it a few years ago.

Oh, it’s too pathetic to even laugh about.  All I can think is I HAD the brass, which became dated, then changed it all out to the nickle and pewter look, and now a few years later, only brass and gold looks “in.”   It’s craziness!  We have become such a throwaway nation.

 
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Here is a kitchen that looks on trend.  The tile floor, modern lights and brass hardware – brings this kitchen up to date.  If the floor was hardwood and the hardware was nickle, it would be pretty – but now, it looks new.
 
 
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The gold and brass with another trendy kitchen item:  the expensive designer range! 

 
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The range, the fabulous hood, the brass, and the dark grout – all trendy items.

 
 
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Can you update a classic bathroom that has white marble/subway tile, and nickle or chrome?  Yes.  Here, the white marble looks so great AND fresh against the brass.  The white marble takes on a totally different feel against the brass.

 
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Brass and gold are all over the accessories market and lighting market.

 
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Here, is another trend that I can’t get behind so much – the mixing of metals.  To me, this just seems like the vanity came with the chrome and they didn’t want to change it.

 
 
White Paint:

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There are two trends with walls – color and white.  If your wall isn’t wallpapered or lacquered, it’s white white.  I love this room above, with its white walls, the cowhide rugs, the stucco fireplace with the antique Swedish clock, and the mix of modern chairs. 

 
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The white in this room is contrasted with the dark curtains and wood furniture.

 
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Here – white walls, neutral furniture – no accents.

 
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And here, another white walls, white furniture with black and gold accents.   One of my favorites!   Love that ottoman.

 
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White houses is another big trend that seems everywhere. This is Sally Wheat’s house with her newly painted white front door and shutters.  When I saw this I wanted to run home and paint my house all white – but my facade can’t compare to Sally’s!

 
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White siding and black shutters and black door. 

 
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Pamela Pierce’s house is a warm white – with white shutters.  White on white with white furniture and urns that finish the look.

 
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I love this white.  Was it a remodel?  Painted white over red bricks?  New windows?  Shades removed?  Or does it just look like a renovation, but is new?   I love the glass awnings.  This looks so today, but still, a classic.


 
Chandeliers:

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Contemporary chandeliers and pendant are more trendy than ever.  There are so many trends in this picture – the light French oak floors, the chandelier, the white walls…and more.

 
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The Sputnik type chandeliers are now showing up in very classic interiors.

 
 
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Even nurseries.  This particular style is very popular.

 
 
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No doubt a young couple, with young children live here. 

 
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And this was Alessandra Branca’s way to update a house she had decorated years ago. I still don’t understand this!

 
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There is just something off here – either go classic or go contemporary or do a mix.  This room is completely traditional, except for the fixture. 

 

Accent Chairs:

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A huge trend is using an accent chair, usually midcentury modern, to take an interior into the 2020s.   Here, every piece is contemporary – to add a French or English chair would look terrible.

 
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This room is a mix of classic and new – the French sofa mixes nicely with the contemporary accent chairs.

 
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Here – a classic interior, with two chairs with contemporary shapes.  They really do add an updated look to the mix.

 
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Here – another mix of new and old – two accent chairs with midcentury lines.  Again – young family – for sure.

 
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I saw this room with the cardboard chair and all the white and I thought, gosh, this seems familiar….

 
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It has to be a coincidence.  I’m sure the clients didn’t show the designer this picture and say, I want this look? Or did they?  Lesson learned:  don’t mess with genius.   By the way, speaking of gorgeous flooring – wow! These floors are fabulous.

 
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Accent chair, check, white walls, check, contemporary lamp, check, gold accents, check, empty frames, check. Hey!  You need a fiddle leaf!!!

 
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The accent chair is everywhere now.  It’s fun to play a game and count the houses with them in the design magazines.  Count the Sputniks too.

 
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Can you have accent chairs without them being mid-century, and still look fresh?  Yes!

 
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The accent chair – with an accent table, looking cozy.

 
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On trend – for 2016!

 
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Even staid Farrow & Ball got into the midcentury accent chair game.

 
Black walls:

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Black walls are still trending.

 
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Especially with modern chandeliers and gold accents.

 
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See? 

Note: White ceilings with black walls are a must.

 
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See?    Don’t do too much black.  These shutters would have been better painted white.  Always paint the ceiling white!!!!!

 
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Can you mix classic design with black walls?  It looks good here, in a guest room.

 
Lacquered Walls:

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Lacquered walls are back – here, they are beyond fabulous!!!
 
 
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Wow.  Love.   I would add more blue and white on the console.  I love the mix of this color green with blue and white porcelains.

 
 
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I love when the sofa is the same color as the walls. Accent chair.

 
 
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Pretty shade of blue. Love the gold mantel!!
 


Wallpaper:

The wallpaper trend continues strong, showing up again and again in trendy decor.

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A beautiful home office –the wallpaper makes it!

 
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This paper makes the powder room look so interesting.

 
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I love this paper – but sheesh!  Too much!  Imagine a muted green & cream linen check at the windows and a textured cream on the chairs.  What a shame – this paper is fabulous.  And while we’re at it, the chandelier is a bit too small, too.


 
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Handpainted wallpaper is so popular now.  Love this contemporary-leaning room.  It’s a nice mix of the old and new.

 
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Using a revival print by Sister Parish – the painted floor gives it a new look. But, the appeal is the classic look of this guest room.

 
 
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Handpainted wallpaper, especially murals are very pricey, so this look is usually reserved for the older set.  Love this!

 
Color:

If it isn’t white or black or lacquered – it’s very colorful!

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Love this – love the pinks and the gold accent consoles.

 
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How did this ever come together so beautifully?   Mixing red, blue, green, peach and pink with velvet tiger print.

 
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White walls, white furniture – but lots and lots of color from curtains and pillows.  Still wanting slipcovers? You can have them, tailored, but mix in colorful pillows and curtains and you will have a new look.

 
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Love the sofa in velvet!

 
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A mix of floral fabrics and wallpaper.

 
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Love this – even though the wallpaper was cut too short for the walls, see it?  Love the pink sofa and green chair.  Sometimes perfection is just boring.

 
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A
A trendy look – using contemporary and mixing in a chintz.
a
 
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Love this Alessandra Branca chintz  - especially in this colorway.  F.Schumacher.

 
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Tory Burch’s new Paris office is beyond fabulous!  Of course it’s Daniel Romualdez, what a team these two are.


Update?

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I want to update, but I can’t afford a huge redo.  Help!  Try adding a gold accent, like this lamp – especially in a contemporary shape.  And add that fiddle leaf. Yes, it still looks good.

 
 
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Just by adding this lamp and a patterned rug, this room looks new and fresh and ready for 2020.

 
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Or just add a Serge Mouille and you’ll be trending.

 
 
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It’s beautiful. It’s classic with contemporary pieces added.  Do you prefer this?  Or….

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Or this? I’ll go with this, thank you very much.   It has to be age thing? Right?

 
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Or, just give me this.  There’s gold!  Contemporary art!   Of course there is – Cy Twombly’s Rome palazzo, 1966.

 
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Or, I don’t know.    Maybe I’ll just move to this little farmhouse and ask Joanna and Chip Gaines to renovate it for me!!


161 comments:

  1. What a fabulous way to start the new year - so much inspiration!
    Sam

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    1. Obama is hiding a dark secret that just came out and this effects you!
      www.liberty.trackdok.com

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    2. Joni......ramp up your exclusions.....seriously. This could include malware!

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  2. Wow, just wow .... I'm so grateful to look at this with your eyes - thank you for sharing with us. I'm also of the vintage that won't bring mid-century back into my space, but I do appreciate the design in the younger generations' space. Has anyone else noticed a trend back to patterned (oriental) carpets?

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    1. Great question! I've noticed that too, especially a retro Hippie thing: Amber Interiors blog does it a lot - mixing with boho pillows but always white walls. Joni?

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    2. the bohemian look - it's big in blogging, probably just there. I personally never see it except in blogs.

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    3. My opinion.....nothing is more classic and has more staying power than "Oriental Rugs"! (not fake ones; not reproductions....honest, real hand-made rugs from India and environs).....thousands of years of the history and craft; and especially the best ones from Afghanistan....and Turkey, Uzbekistan all those poor countries..........now.......... and all over that bombed out and destroyed part of the world.

      Those rug craftspeople.....artists.....those people; and their rugs....beautiful rugs........with their pure natural vegetable and mineral dyes; their beautiful hand looming, and their centuries of traditions are treasures beyond. Their rugs are true treasures. I say don't go to trends here; again! See those? Make sure they are authentic! (NOT RH!! NOT POTTERY BSRN!! MO MATTER WHAT THEY SAY!!!!!!)

      The people who still make these rugs with centuries of history........It kills me.....honestly. Many of their villages have been destroyed....their handcrafts also destroyed....people who make them killed! Generations of these crafts interrupted. Fleeing for their lives......

      If you can find these rugs... buy them. You will have treasures you will never be able to find again; nor replace. Think they aren't trendy? Find the old ones if you can!

      Study all the great decorators of the last 100 years. They use them exclusively almost! ALL OF THEM. CHECK THEM OUT!

      BUATTA
      WILLIAMS
      SALADINO
      HADLEY
      I could go on for 5 pages. I will stop with 3 complete royalty!
      Best of the best....and just a fraction!

      Do not buy those "pale" trendy RH or Pottery Barn rugs! They add no character to where you live. No history. No interest or unusual dimension.

      My old rugs have tales to tell. I can honestly sit among them.....and look at them. They have tales to tell.

      I am writing a blog on this Thank you so much Joni! My rugs are so interesting!! You inspire me! They have people and animals woven into them!!

      Why would I want a pale rug to obliterate my beautiful dark floors??? If I could have rugs that tell stories?!? And I adore dark hardwood floors. Classic. Look at Bunny's h houses!! No "cerused oak floors " in her house; nor any she has done!

      I say POX on trends.....stick with classics and things that mean something to you!

      Stay away from those people in Waco; keep your Granny's things.....and stay away from "trends"!

      Just my opinion!

      About my village, my family, my friends, my animals! Thank you so much!! Tah Dah! inspiration!!

      So enough about my opinion of trends!!!!

      (I , as you know, have had-made terra cotta floors with dog prints in them every now and then; I mean if I had dark, classic floors.....the last thing I would do is bleach them; or buy light rugs to cover them and make them trendy!!! EEEEK!!!!)

      Just my opinion!
      What I adore about you (one of the many things) is you listen to all sides! And you form your own opinions!

      I love love love this post! And the comments are beyond interesting!!!

      Please more round table discussions!!! "The Skirted Roundtable" is my favorite thing on the internet.....and I have now listened to them all twice! New ones; please!!!!

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  3. Felt so sorry for friends down the street, as a girl. They had a plastic kitchen table, and a pitiful clunky loud boxy uncomfortable car.

    Have you already guessed? An original Saarinen table, and a Mercedes.

    Obvious my love for antiques was in the DNA....

    Not a purist, would be happy to mix in a Saarinen. Now.

    Garden & Be Well, XOT

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    1. ahaha. i was THAT girl, but not because my parents were chic artistes - my mom was from Poland and thought anything old meant
      "poor."

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    2. You sure have come a long way, Joni! You are a STAR!!!!!

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    3. By the way; does everyone know that plumbing fixtures are almost always made of brass? Then nickel, chrome, or whatever is the finish over the brass? If you want unlacquered brass; take your faucets, etc. to a metal polisher and have them stripped! You will save a ton of money; and have the new trend in plumbing using your existing fixtures!

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    4. I have now studied Joanna and Chip Gaines a little bit! (I am seriously handicapped by watching no tv. (None)
      Joni; if you buy that farmhouse; promise me you will not hire them to decorate it. It would be a tragedy! You know a thousand times more......and have a thousand times more taste. PLEASE! Do not wish for that!

      XXOO

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    5. If I hear that woman on HGTV say "shiplap" one more time, I may poke my eyeballs out.
      Enough is enough. Geez.
      Sheila

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    6. I love Joanna Gaines' style... and I love the look of shiplap. I didn't know what it was before I saw the show, I just knew I liked the look. And, for the record, I'm not a fan of gold fixtures--it has a gaudy look to me--and I don't care if they become the new thing. I have the nickel finishes now, but when I move or am ready to redo everything, I will go back to chrome. It looks timeless to me, and so pretty and shiny. I have dark hardwood floors that were put in about 6 years ago... at the time I wanted something lighter and grayer, but there weren't many choices available and the few new ones were expensive. So I went with the dark color. I wish I hadn't, but since I have it now, after seeing this post, I am thinking perhaps I should be happy with it... in just a few years (about when we want to sell), the light colored floors may start to look old, and maybe my dark floors will look new again! ;-) We'll see how the trends go... It seems young people like the wood-look tile because of the durability. They want the ease of care and the fact that dogs, kids, etc. can't scratch the finish.

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  4. I'm just confused, but I know I don't like modern.

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    1. I agree. I am a little confused. Looks like decorating has become more complicated. Maybe it is just age!

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  5. Wow, I'm so confused and inspired at the same time! Thank you :D

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  6. I've been aching for this article! Thank you. I'm (sorta) young,40. But so confused and pulled by recent MCM design trends. Honestly, I loath them. So, what's a girl who wants a stylish home to do?!

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    1. Just decorate how you want! I think that might be the point after all? I would!

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    2. Careful.......careful......reread what you just said. Perhaps study. Perhaps consult. I think really bad advice that I don't think you really mean.....do you?

      "Just decorate how you want!" HUH? Educate yourself; or ask someone whom you respect. Don't just go out willy nilly!!! A mess is what you may end up with!! Most people need to study or need some help from some kind of professional. Furniture and things to go into your house are expensive and important. I would say do not "just decorate how you want"!!

      Just my opinion! Be careful! Learn....study. ask.

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    3. Of course you are right Penny! I really meant- that she was saying she didn't like the "new" looks - and I meant to say, then just go with the look you like, whether it's in or out. But you are right, one should always study photographs and determine what it is that you truly like first, then hire a decorator!

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    4. You sweetheart! I agree with everything you explained....except....if she follows what you start with....she won't have to hire anyone! YAY JONI!!!! YES!!!! Study what you like....collect pictures.....and get a direction! You said it perfectly!!!

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    5. I live right in the middle of the High Point Furniture Market--- I am in Charlotte N.C. and believe me, you do not have to study too hard to learn what is in or out or trendy. You only have to see all the "CRAP" that is left behind after furniture market each season that didn't go over well that is pilled to the rafters in warehouses around the High Pint area--- all the junk that was shown at market as "new design" or trendy ideas are mostly things that failed miserably and now are lying around hight point for cheap get rid of prices. Hickory Chair, Mitchell Gold, Century, Hancock and Moore, just to name a few of the over 100 manufacturers all have factories right here in the Hickory and High point area and the word gets around fast before all the designers new pieces come to market about what will rise or fall fast. There are warehouse outlets with bargain prices and if it does not sell there-- it is sent to another "dumping ground" warehouse where they practically give it away--- "BECAUSE WHY"????? because the next market is coming --- every six months. I show at High Point market and there are some beautiful things there and then there is a lot of junk. My dream is always to wish that most people want the junk and that the beautiful classic great stuff such as mahogany, silk velvet and mohair items are left behind for me to go to the piled high warehouses and buy them at ridiculous cheap prices. My chances of finding great classic things in the warehouses that no one wants seems to be improving because the young people today want the "Rooms to Go" junk furniture and the Pottery Barn and restoration hardware stuff that is poor quality so I am happy to rescue the fine "stuff " and give it a loving home.







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  7. So much to discuss! I think trends themselves are over. You can never keep up and if you do that itself is a bit naff honestly speaking. The UK doesn't have HGTV so the nuances of that bit escape me all together I am afraid. But the accent chair is inevitable - it's something that is useful but changes a look. Can't say for the states but many people here make do and inherit furniture - maybe not "pieces" but chairs that have sentimental value so even if it doesn't match the decor or the architecture of the house - the items for the most part stay which explains why British decor isn't as strict and stylized and much more fluid than a new build in Mcmansion America. But my dream home is that Roman flat belonging to the Cy Twombly family and the beauty of the home still withstands trends or whims otherwise dictated to this day.

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  8. joni, you did it again! FABULOUS article, your point of view is always spot on!!

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  9. Your posts always inspire me and make me think. Yes, such a shame that we have become a throw away society. Happy New Year to you!
    Shelley

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  10. haha cracking up over "hey you need a fiddle fig"! Great post. They always inspire me to get up and change some things around in my own home. Thank you and happy new year!!!

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  11. I'm with your friend -- be true to your look. The modern trend might be in now, but I don't think it's here to stay. The throw-away set are minimalists so I can totally see them embracing this style. They don't want their parents old stuff or anything sentimental. I can't help but think that those "in" light fixtures are going to be out soon. Like in five years or less, not ten. I'm sticking with my classic decor with some modern art mixed in. I can get on board with the color trend in moderation. I love that green velvet sofa! One more thing. While I love Joanna and Chip and their show, Joanna is no Martha Stewart. Not even close. Thanks for another great post!

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    1. Shakespeare said it best, "Above all else, to Thine own self be true." I have always loved golds, greens and ivories. No grey or greige of any kind for me. Okay, perhaps my home is not always up to the minute, but it is comfortable and classic. I don't worry about "mass-produced" or "fauxtique" as long as the proportions are pleasing, it is well constructed and comfortable.

      Many of the now expensive vintage French chairs were mass produced in Italy or Denmark in the early to mid 20th century. Three years ago I saw one in a San Antonio antique shop that was in so-so condition for $5,000! Now coveted antique "import China" was also mass produced specifically for export to Europe. Eventually, some of the mass-produced furniture of today will become classics as well.

      "Trends" are for designers, purveyors of home furnishings, sellers of magazines and professional bloggers. It is all about the money. If you have money to burn, burn it. Otherwise, follow the example of Charlotte Moss, the late Charles Faudree, John Saladino and other great designers who re-use the same great and interesting pieces over and over again.

      To Thine own self be true!

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    2. yes! an antique is "100 years old" but there is a huge difference between original and antique. great comment!

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    3. My philosophy exactly. I am exhausted and demoralized by trends. Keep them away from me! I never want my clients houses to look like there was even a decorator "involved"; let alone the decorator "just left"! EEEk! Keep those interesting and well-loved pieces....close to you. Avoid trends like poison! Just my opinion!!! You will have a happy house full of memories and treasures! A true scrapbook of your life! That is what my goal is! (both for myself; and my clients! Appropriate....meaningful, and beautiful!!!)
      The best posts (and they are ALL genius!!) Joni has done (in my opinion) are those of Charlotte Moss, John Saladino, and other great decorators who use the treasures they have collected all through their lives and myriad houses!
      Joni! No one does it better than you! Brava!

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    4. And that's why so many people love your house - it's warm and open, interesting, lots of textures and antiques - the perfect mix. It's a true "dream house" with the guest house and the pond....you are so lucky to live there.

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    5. thank you , Joni, from my heart! You are invited to stay in my teeny tiny guest house with your husband any time you want!
      I would love love love it!
      I mean it!! Any time! It is 500 sq. ft! but it has a bathroom with a shower....and a very comfy Murphy bed!!!!

      I would love it!

      Penny

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    6. Penelope & Joni, Love the idea exchange, and I love the idea of keeping the "interesting and well-loved pieces"... but deciding whether it is "interesting" or not, or how to fit it into one's decor, is another issue. For example, my parents went through a phase of loving "Early American" style, and so I now have a number of "interesting" items, that have a lot of memories for me, and I hate to get rid of them, but I can't live with a house full of it. It's not really my thing... so what to do? How do I choose what to keep?

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  12. Great design trend update. I think you are very accurate. Our culture is very diversified and there is much room for different looks. I think the Gaines are incredible and their PR and popularity are undeniable. And this is HGTV leading the masses. I remember a time when we were seeing big name designers on HGTV but not anymore. Joanna has a great, clean look and it's trendy enough to look fresh. But, it can get somewhat cookie cutterish and she has trended toward a lot of mass produced things that are just so commom at the low budget stores. It bothers me to see a $300,000 - $500,000 (which is not a middle class price range in Waco, TX) house with accent items that can be found at Hobby Lobby. On rare occasions she throws in a unique piece. But she is clever and I suspect her look will morph as well, and I understand that this is sponsorship driven as well. I don't mean to be negative about them though because they appear to be genuine and that is hard to hide. They are very appealing and people can relate to them and who would not want to know them and be their friends? It's a magic combination so I applaud them. As you said, there is room for a lot of different looks and age is a huge factor. We live in a really good and opportunity filled time. You are truly insightful, as always. Blessings for 2016!

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    1. Great comment. Totally agree.

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    2. Terry - Joanna is now pushing her store and her furniture. I do always wonder about the quality of the renovations too. Is the work that good? I wonder. It seems like it is done so quickly.

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    3. I love the look Joanna can bring to a house but was disappointed that I saw so much "Made in China" stickers. Was really hoping for more local artisans.

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    4. Joni....my opinion.....no. Not personal.....no. the work is not that good. Superficial. Not meaningful. Not lasting. No.

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  13. Absolutely wonderful post Joni! I have been pulling my hair over this also. No hard core contemporary for me but I love so much of what you love. Question: lamp shades. I see several that are going toward a slight pyramidal shape with pleats - ala the 70s. What do you think?

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    1. I still like round w/out pleats. I guess. who knows thougH? it's so confusing.

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    2. I love "coolie" lampshades! small top; bigger bottom....no pleats.....no barrel.....eeek! Look on Pinterest.....skip Houzz.....Houzz is so tacky........most of it.

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    3. Houzz is not great. I am loving ONe Kings lately. I love the houses the feature. My gotos are Pinterest, Google Image - and then One Kings.

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    4. Yikes! One King's Lane is going down! It doesn't look good! It is for sale in a "fire sale"!

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  14. It's always interesting to see what the new "trends" are. I cringe when I think of all the money I wasted over the years trying to keep up with the latest trends when I was younger. I should have saved my money and taken some nice vacations! LOL
    Happy New Year!!!
    ~Des

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  15. Decorate with what you love. Let the trends go. Be true to your self but keep editing.

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    1. home before dark says things in a few words. I need to edit better. 17 words. Everything I babble on about ......in 17 words.

      Seriously . Oh well! Needless to say; I agree with all 17 words! Now I will be quiet. Until the next time!!

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    2. The fact that you can't restrain yourself online, Penny, shows what an undisciplined decorator you are. It probably takes you five years to do what an efficient decorator could do in a year. Your lack of control and discipline would make you turn a client's house into chaos. No one wants that. (Of course you're not being hired by anyone now, so...)

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    3. Geez, Anon, you're still here all these years later, still harassing Penny. Amazing.
      Let it go why don't you. And you have the audacity to say that she spends too much time commenting. It looks like YOUR calendar is really empty too.
      Sheila

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    4. Hi Sheila! Thank you for defending me! The fascinating thing is that this person would be so deliberately cruel. As though I had done something cruel or unkind to him/her! He/she has a "bone to pick" all right. Not sure it has anything to do with me.

      As a matter of fact; I am quite busy with decorating projects; and I love reading blogs!!! (particularly Joni's!) It is a way of relaxing! And learning!
      I cannot imagine why this person who is so cowardly as to remain anonymous would attack me the way he/she does. Mystifying.
      It does say a great deal about him/her.

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  16. Oh Joni, just buy a big Gray Malin and slap it up on a wall! That'll do you for a awhile!!! Seriously, big art will take a look into 2020. What I am tired of are homes that look like Homegoods threw up in them! Cheap is always cheap. I like would like to infuse some of the modern ideas and when I begin throwing stuff out, it will be all the Homegoods and TJ Maxx stuff first! But a Saarinen table is perfection! And, BTW, I've been stalking Gen Sohr, Pencil and Paper Co., for a while now, I even made a Pinterest Board. She is really good at getting published!

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  17. WONDERFUL PHOTOS!! In my case...you gotta go with the architecture...log cabin does not equal "all white." Keep on posting, gal!! franki

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    1. Ha ha, same here! Not going to stain my log cabin walls, ceilings, and floors to follow a trend.

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  18. You've seen one Waco House, you have seen them all. I like the look, but it gets boring FAST ! LOVE this post, though, so right on the money with everything. My advice, keep what you love and your will be fine. Chasing trends is much like a dog chasing it's tail, might be fun for a time, but in the end, just a waste of time. Happy New Year Joni !

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  19. Fantastic post! Trends are for dreaming and imagination. I love seeing different styles and many times I can pull off a similar look. This reminds me of fashion magazines. Some of the styles seem outrageous but if they did not, it would be just another Monday. I read some of the comments about Homegoods and Chip and Joanna Gaines. I think that these venues provide average Americans with a way to update their homes in an affordable way. Not everyone can achieve these high end design even though their taste and desire could nail it. Loved seeing the trends and might even add a few to my own home. Thanks for getting us up to speed.

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    1. Well said- there are many lovely home furnishings available at Home Goods that allow young couples to furnish their homes in a gracious manner, it's a bit elitists to assume that everything there is beneath contempt..Good design doesn't have to come with a huge price tag..

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    2. Hi Dolores! I don't think anyone meant that..."beneath contempt"; I don't know what that means! someone with taste can find great things in a dumpster! Just stick with what you love! No one disparaged "HomeGoods" (which I have never heard of) No matter!

      I say go to vintage stores; flea markets, Salvation Army.....buy "old reproductions"; way better than those made in China!!!

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  20. Thorough post on a topic that needed discussion. I always thought that people who went with the trends were insecure/immature about their design sense and wanted to be hip with what was happening just like fashion. They hadn't found their "true" self yet. I think when you do find our design sensibility you stay with it. Doing trends is costly. Nobody will want a sputnik light fixture in a couple years as something new will be trendy. Yet, on the other hand all we hear is that people don't have money to spend on interiors. So why the disposable furniture which is costly to replace. Those French chairs you began the post about are costly mistakes. They are all too small for a grown man to sit in. Wisteria, RH, Cost Plus, Ballard all make the same mistake -- or wait a minute-- maybe it is not a mistake if they want it to be disposable so you will replace them in a short time frame. They are cheap but cheap is not why people should be purchasing furniture. There must be a style for everyone - farmhouse, contemporary, modern, traditional, etc. When I look at Magnolia Home furniture which Joanna said she threw together in 100 days, I can't imagine anybody buying it. Not anybody with design sense, but a few will but they will hate it in a few years. I am in my fifth year of filling out my furniture line. 100 days - NO! It takes time to do it right. Design elements will always have a trend cycle maybe because we all feel the need to renew and refresh and rebuild our nests. One of the reasons I have stayed with Swedish is that it has never gone out of style in 200 years and can look contemporary or traditional like a chameleon.

    Loved the post and I will re-read it several times to grasp it all.

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    1. A french chair like that can be perfect for flanking out a cabinet, at a desk, etc. Not only for dining rooms. The Frnch chair I got from Ballards is big enough for a man. And - I don't think Joanna designed all that furniture. I think she was presented with a line and then tweeked it. Named the pieces, picked the finishes, etc. I could be totally wrong, but you are so right - 100 days?

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  21. Joni: I don't care about trends. That is my answer to your question. The only trend that I like is the brass/gold/ bronze on accents particularly on chandeliers and with neutral furniture.
    As usual I enjoyed your post.
    Casilda Canino

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  22. Thank you for such a well curated look into the new year !!

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  23. I think it's the era of ugly. Now Cy Twombly's home is classic and beautiful. I think because he knew how to mix textures and was a genius about color. Alot of the color combinations that I see now are just garish and to me would be extremely hard to live with. Sitting out this next ten years and doing my own thing.

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    1. Cy Twombly's house is what I am talking about when I drone on about "timeless decorating"! Yay Joni for showing it as an example of a "certain type"!!! You are graduate school in decorating! Yay Joni! You maybe should charge tuition!!!

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  24. Great post Joni! I think it comes back to decorate with what you love and the trends be damned!

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  25. This was a great post and article. I only slightly disagree with one thing you mentioned. I do think that Rachel Ashwell has changed. He does grey and color now which she never did in the 90's... she evolved a bit don't you think?

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  26. I'm 32 and I would never go mid-century modern or hang any sort of sputnik light fixture in my home. I agree with most of your opinions here and do appreciate some of the modern looks. But I will always prefer a more traditional look, so it can't be completely an age thing, right? :)

    Raquel

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  27. Joni, you and I are probably close to the same age. The title of this post really grabbed me. I've seen a lot of trends, too. I like "classic" and comfortable but I love a refreshed look...not with throw away items but with subtle changes...new paint or modern art or fabric...or lightning. And hey, since those sputniks are back...they may be destined to be classic.

    Thanks again for all the entertainment and wisdom. Happy new year!

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  28. Great post, I especially loved the post on RH's deconstructed pieces. Staying true to your aesthetic is key for me. I think the most interesting homes are the honest ones, not contrived to be on trend or current. Often these interiors are a blend of time periods and styles to varying degrees.

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  29. What a wonderful post to start the new year with! Loved it. And, I'm proud to say that I have French cerused oak floors and selected them 5 years ago since I love the warmth and the amazing ability to hide dirt and dog fur. Mine have a gray undertone but are still nice and warm looking.

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    1. you do????? I never knew that! I would love to see!!!

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  30. Great post, I especially loved the post on RH's deconstructed pieces. Staying true to your aesthetic is key for me. I think the most interesting homes are the honest ones, not contrived to be on trend or current. Often these interiors are a blend of time periods and styles to varying degrees.

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  31. Is anyone having trouble with the link on Amazon in this post? I am hoping to find the link to the white tables. Thank you. I enjoyed all of the pictures and commentary. Great pictures on updating to keep things fresh. Thank you!

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  32. This post was great, but so are the comments following! I have to agree with many of them, especially that the Europeans don't do trends, and that people who are constantly following the newest trends are insecure about what they really love. Maybe insecure is harsh and that they just don't know what they love in decor. I, for one have made my biggest mistakes trying to follow trends. The best decisions I've made have been keeping my English and French antiques, staying with lighter walls, hanging on to the timeless accessories, buying smaller items that update a room (i.e. lamps, mirrors, accessories) and only updating the rooms that needed it desperately like the kitchen and baths. Even so, when we remodeled I didn't go too trendy, unless one day soon marble will be as outdated as the RH deconstructed chairs! Financially, my plan is to stop putting money into my house that I can't take with me when we move in a few years. We've spent a small fortune updating with custom built cabinetry, new flooring, etc. From here forward, my money is going into improvements that will move with me! Thanks so much for such an informative post...and entertaining! PS...I'll never, ever, ever go with the modern lighting trends!

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  33. You nailed it when you mentioned "throw away society". Sadly, not just with design. I'm a traditionalist thru and thru so the MCM doesn't appeal to me at all. I've never felt my home was outdated. It's a state of mind perhaps, but trends are just that - trends. Here today, gone tomorrow. Interesting post, thanks & Happy New Year!

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  34. You are so right about the age perspective. I think by the time we have reached a certain age, we have seen it all, tried it all, and maybe at a certain point our eyes are trained well enough to see the classics as the smart way to go. Many furnishings are an investment, and for most people it is not feasible to pitch out a perfectly good piece and replace it with a "trend". I think the comment by the person from the UK is spot on in that inherited things have value to us even if they are not trendy. Certainly a piece with a history says something about who you are and where you came from. It gets very tiresome trying to keep up with trends, and by the time we reach a certain age, we have other priorities as to where we spend our money and our energies. Even those of us who are older but still like to decorate and keep things fresh can do things like freshen the walls, use new upholstery or slipcovers and pillows, inject plants and rearrange the furniture to update the premises from time to time. My last thought, before I get off my soap box, is that the "throw-away" mindset is quite a deeper commentary on society today.

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    1. I have some friends from the "South" and the "UK"; they share a similar story I have not heard from other places.....
      They don't "buy" furniture. They "have" furniture. Meaning they "inherit" furniture. I grew up in Pasadena , California.....and somehow or other; I grew up with that exact idea. (My mother was from the South....ancestors from England, Ireland...Scotland)!

      It did not occur to me to buy "new furniture"!

      Now it is all the rage. I think it is a great time to buy antiques. My mother did in the fifties when the rage was "Danish Modern"! She bought museum quality antiques at that time with grocery money!

      Who knows? I love things that mean something!!!

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    2. I am from 'the south', and I couldn't agree more. I am 43 and my home, a colonial, has items from my great great grandmother up to a month or so ago when I picked up a few new throw pillows. I am in no way a designer, however friends and acquaintances are always asking for design help....my usual advice is to study the greats, see what appeals to you, buy the best you can afford, and be patient/save for better quality. Over time your home will evolve into 'you' ....which is a beautiful thing. I believe a home should express you, not design trends. I have thoroughly enjoyed this post and the comments.

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  35. Loved your article! I was wondering what is the trend for window coverings? Do the trend for windows stay for longer periods? They are such a big part of every room's decor.

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  36. Great post and wonderful comments. I'm in your generation, Joni, and grew up in a mid-century modern ranch. My father had a degree in architecture and everything had to be modern, though my mother wanted more family pieces. My father ruled. So of course I dislike everything MCM, inherited my grandparents' antiques and love a relaxed traditional look. I definitely know what I like and I still find I like many photos of rooms I've saved from twenty to thirty years ago. So, I'm not trendy, even if I can appreciate different looks. I do not like the current emphasis on changing everything to stay current, and therefore less attention to quality and craftsmanship. Throwaway society, indeed. I suppose it generates sales and drives sectors of the economy, but it seems wasteful. I even cringe when the Gaines tear everything out. I hope they recycle some of their materials and kitchens that are in decent condition. There are so many people who have so little, that could use it.

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    1. I've often wondered why those cabinets and other elements aren't carefully removed and taken to a restore or salvage instead of torn up. Seems like such a waste for someone who could use them.

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    2. I've often wondered why those cabinets and other elements aren't carefully removed and taken to a restore or salvage instead of torn up. Seems like such a waste for someone who could use them.

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    3. I TOTALLY agree. They could salvage so much and send it to one of their warehouses and just donate it. It's almost criminal. Rehab Addict salvages everything - everything!!!!

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  37. What a great post Joni! Loved reading it! You made me thinking!

    Wishing you a wonderful, happy and healthy 2016 !
    xoxo
    Greet

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  38. This is such a helpful, clarifying post-- great scope and focus, Joni! Thank you for covering a range of incomes and ages this time. I am also caught in your midlife conundrum, but now my heart is also with my young adult children (and all their friends) who are now creating family homes on limited budgets (college debt is real, y'all). Young people just starting out, and everyone else with less-than-glamourous incomes regardless of age, all deserve to live their lives in as much loveliness as they can conjure out of their means. Even the great, now uber-wealthy Martha Stewart got her start as a passionate DIY-er who appealed-- at that time-- mostly to very young homeowners. (Her constituency has aged along with her; a lot of younger people today do not remember her as the young, hip, gamechanging rebel she was in the 80's!) There are so many varieties of loveliness! Those variances in taste can confuse and discomfit us, but they do not trouble me like this increasing affinity for growing bored so quickly does. Surely this is a symptom of something amiss, a larger cultural problem. Maybe if people spent more time in their rooms curled up with books instead of plugged into all these screens pushing trends and merchandise at them constantly... they would feel more at peace and content in their spaces? Just a thought. Also? Those MCM chairs? You'll be way more comfortable swiping on your screen in most of those than you will be curled up with a novel for an hour! Maybe there's the root of the generational shift?

    And your fiddle leaf fig comment also made me laugh! You are so funny and engaging, Joni. Happy New Year!

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    1. About the incomes - while, I don't have a big income at all, I still love to see how the other side lives. At the same time, I love a great budget renovation. In fact, I love nothing more than one. It's just hard to strike a balance sometimes, but I try. I wish I got more great renos, but those people usually have their own blogs.

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    2. Joni......your blog could not be better.

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  39. Great post! But I think it would be nice of you to give the designers of these wonderful room the credit.

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  40. I so enjoyed your post. Although I am not familiar with all the designers you cited and the pictures of their work, they certainly support the premis of this post. I donot care for the MCM look. With that being said, I struggle with finding my own design style. The elements you cover in this post will help me break down the designs that I like and learn how to incorporate them in my wandering design style.

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  41. Dear Joni, Lots of great ideas, ways to freshen up our decor with just a few changes!!
    As always thank you for all the work you do on these beautiful posts!
    xoxo
    Karena
    The Arts by Karena

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  42. Awesome post Joni and as always you are spot on. Thank you for it!
    Happy new year.

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  43. I loved this post so much!! Thanks so much. I agree that we have a throw-away culture, yikes I wonder what my kiddos will think is fresh and on trend down the road, will we be back at brass is bad? As long as the orange/red/honey woods and cherry-stained everything doesn't come back I will be a happy camper. Please never!

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  44. What a great post. I think about this stuff too much, especially since I'm remodeling a house and having to make design choices that I don't want to be trendy with, yet still be updated and stay true to my aesthetic. You nailed it all! ~Delores

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  45. Face it, Cost Plus and Ballard Design chairs look cheap as hell in person....

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  46. We purchased light planked flooring almost a year ago.
    We love it!! Every one we know has dark. We did not feel like it was a far out decision because we went with what we loved.
    Hopefully they will see the light soon : )

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    1. 6 years ago I remodeled a home. I made a decision instead of removing parquet flooring in the den I added it through the entire home and instead of staining it dark I went natural. I have gone back and forth if I should have stained it or ripped out the den parquet and went with plank flooring like everyone one else. I am glad to see natural is coming back in.

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  47. I'm in my mid-thirties, have loved French design since I was about 9 years old, and I don't plan on changing to MCM or any other trend any time soon. I suppose younger generations are accustomed to technology changing so rapidly, they do not think twice about design changing quickly because information can be shared instantly. As you mentioned, once the masses can duplicate a high end look, it instantly becomes passe! (my keyboard lacks accents). And since we live in a culture that doesn't necessarily value the traditional wisdom and values of older generations, they don't revere true antiques and well-built homes/architecture either. It's sad, but maybe that will mean more antique choices for me, ha ha! Thank you for writing this article. Hope to see more like it!
    Robin

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  48. What an excellent post! Thank you for always doing such indepth research and work. I am almost 40 and tend to navigate toward the more classic/traditional design. But I have changed out cushions to introduce more color and also now have some original abstract art because the house was feeling too "granny." I'm really enjoying the balance. With regard to changing out your decor every couple of years, it depends greatly on the type of buyer. People would rather buy a cheap knock-off at IKEA than save up for the real deal, contemporary or otherwise. Decor is no longer an investment, but an impulse and for this reason the quality of goods is terrible. Most people can't recognize a quality built wood piece because it doesn't matter if you are only going to replace it in five or so years. There is an educational element that has disappeared. I like my investment pieces. I LOVE them. They were not an impulse. They were bought after falling in love with them, not a mere tryst, but full on love affairs. I want my home to feel settled, welcoming, warm and inviting and I don't know if I could do that with temporary things.

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  49. In 1988 we inherited my grandparent's midcentury living room furniture and used it until it wore out, then got a good quality couch that lasted through three kids and then recovered it in green velvet. I am uncomfortable with the throw away culture out there. But I finally painted my great-grandmother's dining room chairs white.

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    1. I do not like the throw away society either. My father raised me to be a furniture snob. I will buy a piece of higher quality pre-owned piece of furniture that has traditional lines (Henredon Chinese Chippendale dining room chairs)and have the seats updated in upholstery before I will go buy new furniture from china that no one knows what toxins they have used in order to make it. Have you noticed when the new furniture finish is chipped you cannot touch it up with stain? Pitiful.

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  50. This article was giving me heart palpitations at first because we are getting ready to move to our dream home and my pin boards are full of the classic ideas I want to use. I am 40 by the way. And I am not a designer; but I like to read some design blogs. One thing that was not discussed here is that you almost NEVER see these trends in regular homes or you see them on a huge delay. I live in Columbus, OH and most of my peers own homes 400K and up. People here are JUST starting to put in white kitchens! You see some classic or eclectic, but most homes look like a Pottery Barn catalog from 10-20 years ago. Before you say that this is a small mid-west town, I will remind you that it is the capital city with a population of 1.5 million. AND when we visit my sister in Chicago, regular people are only slightly more on trend there. I love when you write these kinds of posts. Very interesting with great pics. Just wanted to point out the "regular people" thing.

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    1. This is such a good point! I love following a few blogs and looking at House Beautiful, but most people I know have no idea about some of this. I fell in love with KWID Imperial Trellis and spent a fortune having two chairs upholstered in it years ago when it was so special-- before there were knock offs everywhere, that is, but no one I know has any idea that this fabric is "tired" and I don't care, I still love it and appreciate that I have the real thing whether or not anyone else knows what I have. Real estate is the same here and I'm not far from DC. Builders are still using orange wood floors, brown or black glossy granite, and dark wood cabinets. I rarely see, even in high price ranges, houses like the ones that seem to be abundant in Houston and Atlanta (wish I did)!!! So, it is funny to think about "trends" when you sit back and realize that most people are not even paying any attention the way all are!!

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    2. this is so true. soooo true. when I look at the houses for sale on HAR - no matter the price - I will look at 200 houses to find 2 that I could put on the blog. the majority of people don't know, don't care about how their house looks, or they think it looks good... the blog is for people who like and know design. It's not for everyone, at all. most of my friends and family don't read it - they just aren't into design. great comment!

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  51. Thank you Joni, I appreciate your well-researched and illustrated post. It is a bit worrying to see that we have been classified as "on trend" in so many ways ... As surely we will be "off trend" soon. We have only done what pleases us and compliments our space as a whole. Most of the "on trends" have been with us for ages. Soon our now "off trends" eg. Our Persian carpets and amazing antique mahogany extendable to seat 16 dining table will swing back. So I think with half on and half off we can enjoy watching the world spin past!
    My thirty year sons prefer vey clean pared down furniture as space is a premium - as is light in Vancouver Canada.
    Makes us weep for them to see how cheap housing is in many parts of the US when one cannot buy a small 2 bedroom apartment for half a million here.
    Thank you again for this thought provoking and amusing post.

    Regards Janine

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  52. If I want a beautiful and timeless home, I'd be much happier with the work of a wonderful designer you once featured a few years ago- Schyler Samperton. I don't think her rooms would feel dated for many years, and with a few pillow changes, everything would be current again.I don't believe in following decorating trends which would have you throw everything out to start anew..What a total waste of materials, time and effort.
    Here is your wonderful post, Joni, that I still LOVE!!!
    http://cotedetexas.blogspot.com/2013/09/a-designer-to-love.html

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    1. She is fabulous; and you are so right! Youthful exuberance......great taste....timeless appeal! Brava! I agree wholeheartedly !!!!!!

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  53. Loved the Pamela Pearce designs, both before and updated. Rooms like those suggest suggest such an organic, clean, and serene life. Every day you would want to go in those rooms with tea and a good book and have a little "me" time.

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  54. I love this post. I'm 48 and it has taken me until these past five years or so to stick with what I love. Often, if I try to switch it up and follow a trend, I almost always end up getting rid of that piece, whether it's furniture or art. If you stay with what you love, you'll never tire of it. By the by, I know you are an Outlander fan ... Have you seen the latest article in Elle magazine?? The photo of Claire and Jamie on the blue velvet sofa is to die for!! ;)

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    1. omg! I can't wait for Season 2 in Paris - it's going to be gorgeous!!! all those navys and yellows. so excited!!!

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  55. Joni, Love the reminder from Cy Twombly’s Rome palazzo, 1966. Timeless. Elegance. Always. In Style.

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  56. Great post Joni! I think you may have forgotten to include Ralph Lauren. His design esthetic has not changed all that much but is lovely and very "collected" looking without all the trendy hype. His clothing is a perfect example of that. He can mix modern with vintage in a way that is current without trying too hard.

    Happy New Year xo

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  57. Fabulous post as usual. So much information and gorgeous examples of each trend covered. You do so much research for your posts.
    Thank you for sharing such great information.

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  58. Hi Joni! Great post!

    Trendy is never my thing! The funniest is that there are so many things I have loved my entire career (over 40 years) that you call "trendy"!

    HA!!! They are really classics.....that have never been "OUT"! So many of my treasured favorites are in this post! Amazing!
    (and NONE of them are mid-century modern!) I was born then....and I have disliked that style of furniture and houses ever since!

    Just my opinion!!! So many great things are in your amazing post! Yowzers!!!!
    T
    hank you for such a magnificent post!!!!

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  59. You really never disappoint with these thoroughly researched posts and your fun, spot on comments!

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  60. Thank you! I studied design, am not a designer. Our style is classic; yet fluid and evolving. Feeling a change coming, I had great anticipation for the next design trend. Through the fall I began to see changes; mid-century mixed with modern and traditional; the mix left me bewildered and confused. My November copy of Veranda arrived; what was usually a treat turned ugly. I found myself running back and forth to my husband's home office "Look at that light fixture, this color, that mantle - it doesn't make sense, it's chaos!". After a day of pouring over pages, I passed my copy to a friend, before making myself and husband nuts! Disappointed, and searching for answers I had an opportunity to speak with a designer; she offered that the new trend is "young: defined by an eclectic mix that appears collected and has a playful vibe", then concluded my classic style was "dull" - ouch. The encounter resulted in further confusion; I felt alone, outcast, old, passe - even my pearls and black pumps felt insecure. Your post today spoke to my heart, and validated my bewilderment. I feel honored today to be in your esteem company. Hoping this "trend" will evolve into something less chaotic - I'm feeling secure because you never disappoint.

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  61. I am falling into the chintz trap myself. Looking for one that I think will work in my all white space though, aint all that easy. I've been trying to get in touch with you!!!! I don't know why - but it seems like you're not getting any of my emails. Check your inbox. I need your help! :) xoxo, Artie

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    1. I couldn't help myself....Chintz is not a "trap"! My lifelong favorite chintz just appeared in the brand new House beautiful in Miles Redd's mothers new office. I could die!!!

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  62. Hi Joni!
    It has been too long since I have been here. So glad to stop in and say "hello"! I have been in a bit of a mid-life crises myself trying to figure out my own style and how it is evolving. But really, I do think that age is not a factor. I think we are about the same age, and there are other designer/bloggers out there our age who have a very contemporary aesthetic I think. I find I am getting a bit more contemporary....or perhaps it is more tailored and pared down....as I get older. I just want the freedom of less "stuff" everywhere....less responsibility for taking care of all the clutter and more freedom to travel and do things....rather than have things.

    It is funny that you have written about the Gaines couple too! I do watch them sometimes and find their show pretty entertaining, but much of what they have shown lately are older shows/reruns. Even the Gaines have updated their style in more recent shows to midcentury and more modern. But they do have a knack for mixing it up and making things more "friendly". However, I think their main attraction for folks is that they achieve these looks with product that is easily accessible for the average person via Wayfair or other online resources.

    Someone above also mentioned Ralph Lauren, and he has many styles, many of which are very contemporary. I think all styles are great, and it is all in the mix. New, old, high, low, as long as it is not static, it stays interesting and personal.

    Great post and it really gets me thinking how to make 2016 a modern yet classic year!

    Happy New Year Joni!

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  63. Great post as always! Middle age is a strange thing. 5 years ago I moved from my very traditional "English stone cottage" in CT to a midcentury modern home in Santa Barbara. When I was house hunting I at first looked at traditional homes but when I stumbled upon a midcentury modern that was flooded with light, I was smitten. I think I wanted a change and a challenge at this stage in my life. And while I have white walls, some modern accent chairs and a bit of gold, I also have a rustic farm table, and a traditional upholstered bed and not a stick of midcentury furniture or sputinick lights to be found! It really is all about the mix and I couldn't be happier with our new home and way of living! I guess you could call it my midlife crisis! :)

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  64. This post was great to read. I am not that young (43) and am in the process of building a house for the first time. When we moved to our rental and got rid of some furniture, the furniture that I wanted to keep to were all from my grandparents houses. For some time I have been eclectically mixing my grandparents and great-grandparents mid-century modern furniture and more traditional farmhouse type furniture together for a look that I love. I wanted to update with lighter washed floor that you mentioned here and comfortable velvet couches in the new house with much lighter wall colors. This post in full of great ideas for mixing all my much loved family pieces. Love it.

    Kendra

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  66. Joni,

    Wonderful, wonderful post and a very important topic, I think. My thoughts are that what you first said at the beginning of the article is the most true; some of the finest designers of our time really stayed true to their aesthetic. They may have tweaked things over the years, but really the ESSENCE of their style stayed. That is important. My furniture and art work is actually all about 20 years old, bought when we were first married. And funny enough, it does not look dated, mostly because they are all antiques! When I found things needed changing up, it was subtle things. I changed the shape of my lamp shades, got rid of my curtain "swags" and went with simpler drapes, changed out some accessories, and replaced the overly "tasseled" pillows of the 90's. I have replaced some soft goods like couches, but other than that, my furniture is all the same.

    And as a person who works in fashion, I must say that "trends" in the design world are largely created by magazines and retailers to sell more stuff (just like fashion designers). You did a post on Carol Glasser awhile ago (a couple of years ago? I'm not sure) showing how she has tweaked her style, and there were some changes, but I feel like her style, her "essence", is the same. She would not be adding any sputnik lights!

    Thanks for a great post Joni!

    Sheila
    www.maisondecinq.blogspot.com

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  67. I agree that the world of interiors and furnishings is becoming more and more disposable/transient. We are exposed to so many images of homes that our eye tires of the sameness and it is easy to want to jump on the bandwagon of the new, for many. I think it is a lot like fashion, which is becoming too hard to keep up with as well. What a brain drain. Creativity gets watered down and co-opted by corporations for the profit mill. How nice it would be to be truly comfortable with your choices and know they would last (and function) for the long haul.
    I enjoyed this post. It made me think. Thanks.

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  68. Such a fun and interesting post! Love your point---about brass and mixed metals. I was a child of the 80s and grew up with THAT brass, but it's a different ball game. You know it's a trend when you can find it in mini at pottery barn kids. See the play kitchen set below.
    I do have a question for you Joni, hoping to learn from such a well seasoned designer. I personally like mixed metals but can see why some would not. We will soon be remodeling a powder room---but also plan to sell in the next few years. Do you think that mixed metals appeal to some generations more than others---or is it purely personal? http://www.potterybarnkids.com/products/gray-chelsea-all-in-1-kitchen/?pkey=dplayroom-kitchens&&dplayroom-kitchens

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  69. http://www.potterybarnkids.com/products/gray-chelsea-kitchen/?cm_src=AutoRel

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  70. Hi Joni...Happy New Year...I HATE mid century/modern decor. I can respect the clean lines of some of the true mid century furniture but it just does not appeal to me at all! Give me a collected look...antique furniture...slipcovers...and seagrass and I am a happy girl!!! As far as the Fixer Upper/Gaines folks I find it quite suffocating that they now have their own subdivision, a furniture line, silos, a retail store, and many children and farm animals to tend to...they must have A LOT OF HELP behind the scenes...and her husband gets on my last nerve! But none the less since HGTV constantly reruns their show I keep tuning in...I do love shiplap! PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE do a post of any updates of your house...those are my absolute favorite post on your blog!!!!! Much love from Stacy Lovoy in Alabama!

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    1. I like some Mid Century designs but think you sure better have the architecture to support it. I have seen this style used in country farmhouses and for me, that just doesn't work and then everything looks cheap. At one time, I thought I would go all out for mid century style when I took a city apartment. Seemed like it would be the chance to go for it. Took one step into that place and saw the cherry cabinetry and lovely wood blinds and lots of molding and realized my own stuff would be best. And it was! Mid century would have looked cheap in that pretty place. I like it but it only works in some settings and even then, has a cold look that would not be welcome on a cool Fall evening. Homes should be cozy and welcoming and I don't feel that with Mid century.

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  71. The Gaines are HOT right now. I think their design style represents how real people want to live. Not too fancy to live on, not too frou frou, just a livable alternative to high style.

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  72. The Gaines are HOT right now. I think their design style represents how real people want to live. Not too fancy to live on, not too frou frou, just a livable alternative to high style.

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    1. I have been watching the Gaines for a while. I am growing tired of their look. Some of the furnishings look really cheap to me. I was discussing with a friend the other day on when were the Gaines going to start evolving their look because so many people are doing it that it is becoming "common". A lot of it looks very hobby lobby to me. I own nothing from that dreadful institution of bad design.

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    2. I also don't know what the fuss is about concerning the Gaines. Nice people, for certain, but kind of junky, flea market style. Especially in the "art" and accessories. Good for a farmhouse or vacation home, but not regular living.

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    3. I could not agree more. I have just sold my home and moved from Fredericksburg, Texas back to the big city and I am so tired of their look. We saw it everywhere in Fredericksburg and every new resident who moved to town thought they must immediately go for this look in addition to sticking a big ol' Texas star somewhere on the exterior of the house. And what's wrong with high style anyway? Beach houses and lake houses are perfect for inexpensive furniture but even then, I want my own unique style. For me their style is "what not to do."

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  73. Joni! You are the BEST! You generate so many great comments from so many GREAT people! I am fascinated by every one! I have been a decorator for 45 years......and I continue to learn and am so curious every single day!

    Your comments from people of all ages....all parts of the country....and all budgets! I LOVE them! They teach me so much!

    XXOO

    Forever grateful,

    Penny

    ps googling Gaines right now!

    pps someone just saw me in my house in Pasadena; TV (TLC) circa 1986; "Dream Living" Me "sailing through my house with the hostess of the show!)

    Astonishing. 18 or 19 years later??!!??!! Maybe that is what I mean by "no trends" and "timeless decorating"!!!! Amazing!

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  74. I enjoyed this post very much. My husband and I just built a house north of Austin, Tx. For flooring in the bedrooms we used white oak planks oil brushed and in the living areas....travertine!. I know that travertine has been overused but I read your post on how to update travertine.. For the walls, trim and doors I went with pure white! It makes my floors look amazing as well as my inherited dark wood pieces (from my great grand parents and in-laws) My house has always had a mix of furniture from different periods but somehow I make it work, according to friends and family that visit my home. The reason for using those flooring materials was that we built in the country side and those surfaces don't show dust as much. As far as trends go, I have never followed them, I decorate with objects and fabrics (linen) that make me happy and are made out of wood or glass or silver that have been in our families. I know these days you can buy anything in the stores and whenever I see something that we own and it has been mass produced I smile because I know I have the real deal. Thank you Joni for all your posts. I have visited your blog for advise on so many things so many times that I feel as if I owe you money,lol!! Even some aspects of my new house were modeled after that post you did on Prince Charles and Camilla's summer home!! Obviously in a much more smaller scale!! Thanks again and Happy 2016 PS: It is just recently that I have been able to leave comments! :)

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    1. Joni.....I hope this warms the cockles of your heart! This is the evidence of your reach...and your impact on the women in the world who want to create a lovely home! Brava girl!! Look at what you have done! I choked up reading this! YAY!!!

      Martha...you are going up the right path! Lucky you to have those family treasures.....I do too..and they make my heart sing every day of my life! and remind me of the relatives and the memories they are a part of! Key words here: "They are the real deal!!!!"
      Stuff made in China and copied from "the real deal" will never give comfort and emotional satisfaction....never.

      Stick with things that mean something to you. Those fake cozy people....sorry. They are just fake.

      Penelope

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    2. Hi Penelope! I admire your work and I have perused your blog many times. Just a few minutes ago I was actually thinking of you because I would like to grow Virginia creeper on two stucco walls. I remembered you saying that for the plant to grow faster you must (blank).... I can't remember what you said so I will visit your site and look for that tidbit of information. Thanks to you and Joni for blogging, sharing and enlightening us!

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    3. I hope you got my message......buy 5 gallon "Boston Ivy" if you can.....1 gallon if you can't! Take the vines off the "stick" after planting; and tape them to the wall....(duct tape....any tape...that is kind of strong); spread the tendrils out across the wall far apart...water....by hand. Their little "feet" will get hold of the wall......and you won't believe how fast they will cover! Good luck; please keep me posted!

      Penelope

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  75. A few years ago Ballard design I think it was paired up with a designer for a promotion--the designer from Urban Grace interiors the talented Erika Powell. Now she has moved a building from the heart of Alys Beach (a zipcode with a $$$) the building well i'm sure those that follow her instagram need not be told the back story but the long and short of it She is a rising star in the design world if one visits her web page , I look forward to you Joni entertaining us with a profile of Erika!!!

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  76. i am here in atlanta at scotts antique show followed by the gift show. as a designer and shop owner, it is very confusing out there. thank you joni for adding some clarity. and as i am about your age, the confusion is greater, for me.
    this was a beautifully informative post, thank you.
    debra

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  77. Good post! Yes, its all quite confusing. Its so important to try and establish how we live, our likes and dislikes, identify what 'speaks' to us, what makes us comfortable, etc... There is trial and error to be sure, and we do have our personal design sense much more fine tuned as we get older. Our homes are truly a mirror, a huge part of our personality - I love seeing peoples homes, big & small,rich poor,all of it. I saw a older woman on YouTube showing her holiday decor - she lived in a very small apartment,very plain. But wow, what she did with it was amazing and her pride showed..it was uplifting to watch. Homes are personal, forget the latest trends and just do your own unique thing.

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  78. Hi Joni,
    Great and Fabulous post as always!
    I was wondering if you've notice how many new interior design photos show the Hermes throw blanket? It's right up there with the ubiquitous fiddle leaf. It seems to be the required new home accessory, even though I think it's a little pretentious. I was wondering, do you know of any other decor accessories that are trending or could be added to give an updated look? Maybe you might post about it (hint, hint). Thanks so much, love your work!

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  79. Wow! You have all wonderful photos. I so love your kitchen and bathroom. They really look gorgeous and very trendy. There is so much inspiration in this post! Thanks for sharing!

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  80. Nice collection you have shared with us. Designs are wonderful.
    Blinds in South London

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  81. I'm trying to decide on a direction for new floors in our entire house (there were at least six different kinds of flooring when we moved in). I knew you'd have a post about the lighter, limed floors that have been everywhere for the last year or so. Thank you for addressing that!

    Thank you also for so many inspirational spaces showing medium and dark floors. It goes to show that you can't really make a bad decision as long as you love the final look!

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  82. Hi Joni, Do you have a source for the gold table lamp in the "sitting nook" photo with the drop leaf table and the fiddle leaf? I would love to update my living room with that lamp. Thanks so much!

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  83. Great collection!I like it.So beautiful

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  84. The Noble Floors Wholesale offer online a huge online shopping catalog with more than 15,000 different flooring like wood tile, laminate, glass tiles, natural stones, travertine, marble and pavers.

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