02 August 2010

Hanham Court by Cabbages and Roses

This week on the Skirted Roundtable we welcome Christina Strutt, the founder and head designer of Cabbages and Roses, an English based fabric, clothing, and home decor company.    As the name implies, Cabbages and Roses has a romantic look, similar to Laura Ashley and Rachel Ashwell.  Their fabrics are checks and stripes, roses and chintz, all in wonderful colors.    Strutt has also written many books, and her most recent, At Home With Country, was just released.  In her new book, she features many houses, most in the United States,  outfitted with Cabbages and Roses fabrics.     Besides all the stateside houses,  she also includes her own wonderful house in Bath.   Another  English house, really a historic castle near Bath,  featured in the book is Hanham Court.    Hanham Court is the country estate of the famous garden designing couple – Isabel and Julian Bannerman.   The Bannermans have designed gardens for such elites as The Prince of Wales at Highgrove, Lord Rothschild at Waddesdon Manor, the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk, Sir Andrew Lloyd Webb, John Paul Getty II at Wormesley, and the list goes on and on.  They also won the competition to design the British Memorial Garden at Ground Zero in New York City.  

I have been planning to do a blog post about the Bannermans for over a year now, so having Christina Strutt on the Skirted Roundtable discussing her new book with its chapter on Hanham Court gave me the incentive to finally tell their story!  

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The Bannermans live at Hanham Court with their three sons. The gypsy caravan they keep at Hanham Court is often photographed.

 

The historic house, Hanham Court, located between Bath and Bristol, started life in the 11th century and has been added onto a multitude of times.    The Bannermans have lived there for 15 years, spending much money and effort on recreating the lush gardens which were bare when they arrived.     Besides running their thriving garden design business, the Bannermans have turned Hanham Court into a tourist destination.   It is open for daily tours, overnight visits and is a popular  party venue.    Since there is also a chapel, a mediaeval abbey, connected to the house, many weddings are booked here too.    Throughout their residence, the Bannermans have created many romantic gardens, secret walkways with gates, along with ponds, fountains, and a pool.   Almost every historical era in design is represented on the estate.  The barn dates from Norman times, the gables and gatehouse are Tudor, the main building is Elizabethan, there are Georgian era additions and an Arts and Crafts Kitchen wing and loggia added in the early 1900s.   In the 19th century there was a regothification to the exterior and interior. 

 

image  An aerial shot of the large estate showing how many different buildings make up Hanham Court.

 

Inside the estate, the rooms are the very definition of English Country Manor cluttered style.   Every wall, table, and shelf is jammed full with prints, books, papers, and knickknacks.  The interiors are very, very casual and quite messy.   Surprisingly, this past April, Christie’s held a large sale of the Bannerman’s many collections and possessions.   A total of 300 items went up on auction.   The Bannermans said the sale was needed to provide funds in order to focus their attentions to the gardens.   Seeing photographs from their gardens, it’s hard to imagine what else it could possibly need, but they said “it is time for surprises in the garden…we have been aching to get on with.”    The sale brought in around $1,600,000 – much higher than estimated.      To be able to sell over 300 items from one’s house and still have enough left over to furnish a castle is proof of the Bannerman’s collecting bug.   It will be interesting to see what changes will be made to both the inside and the outside of Hanham Court now that they have done the spring cleaning to end all spring cleanings.

 

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Hanham Court shown in 1900.   You can see how bare the gardens were. 

 

 image And, even earlier, in 1861.

 

 

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Upon arriving on the estate, a glimpse of the house seen through the flowering shrubs.  Beautiful stone wall.

 

 

image The  main section of the estate with its round tower.

 

 

image A view of the English styled gardens.

 

 

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Entering the estate through its  ornamental iron gate.

 

 

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The walkway flanked with topiaries leads to the front door.

 

 

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Tulips planted in a large tub.  The wisteria climbs over the front side of the estate.

 

 

 

image Close up of the terrace in front of the round tower.

 

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The old coach door, opens unto the green lawn, shown below.

 

 

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A view from inside of the vast lawn with gardens on each side.  The swimming pool is hidden behind the gardens on the left side of the lawn.

 

 

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Same view in spring.  To the very right is the top of an ornamental gate on the property (shown below.)

 

 

 

 

image The wooden ornamental gate to the right of the lawn.

 

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The swimming pool – so pretty!

 

 

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The same view in the dead of winter.

 

 

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Another walkway through an arched stone gate.

 

 

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The back of the house with its arched loggia where wedding receptions take place and plants are sold to tourists visiting the gardens.

 

 

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Inside the house – the grand staircase is lined with the best of the Bannerman’s oil paintings.

 

 

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This photograph is from Christina Strutts’ book, At Home With Country.  The pillow on the chair is from the new Cabbages and Roses fabric line in blacks and grays and whites (my favorite!)

 

image Centuries old staircase – amazing!  I assume this is in the round tower, but I’m not sure. 

 

image The stone floor hallway leads off the dining room, kitchen stairs, grand hall staircase, and entrance hall.   The dining room is to the left.

 

 image The dining hall was once dark before a former owner lightened the wood.   The Bannermans recently limewashed the wood. 

 

 

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A close up of the dining hall.  Notice the old stone flag floor. 

 

image Looking the other way at the fireplace in the dining room.  Towards the door – you can see the main staircase shown before.  The round medallion above the fireplace was sold at the Christie’s auction.

 

 

image A main sitting room with green wallpaper, blue wood paneling, and seagrass.

 

 

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A closeup of the cluttered fireplace mantel.  This photograph comes from Strutt’s At Home With Country.   The framed intaglios were sold in the Christies auction.  OK – who wants to just run their arm over the mantel and knock all those vases off?????  Me first! 

 

 

image This photograph is from At Home With Country.  The chair and pillows are covered in Cabbages and Roses fabric.

 

 

image The same chair went up for auction – the chair dates from 1815 and sold for $2,884.    I would have to make a new seat cushion!!!

 

 

 

 

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The red library is one of the most used rooms in the castle.   The bookcase and fireplace are gothick styled.  The bookcases were sold at auction as were the two chairs and the center table.   I wonder what the room will look like after it is redone.

 

 image Looking back out the windows in the red library.   The fireplace mantel is amazing.

 

image From Strutt’s At Home With Country.  Here the red library looks deep pink, ,which is the true color.   The chair wears Cabbages and Roses fabric.   Through the door is the stone hallway off the main staircase shown before.

 

 

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Another photo from At Home With Country.   The small bookcase in the corner is shown below at auction:

 

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The small bookcase from 1860 went for $4,999.

 

 

image The large Irish bookcase from 1820 sold for over $18,000.

 

 

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The library’s 1870 center table sold for over $9,000.   Even more from the library was sold at auction.  I wonder where they will store their books now?

 

 

 imageThe kitchen wing was added during the Arts and Crafts Movement in the early 1900s.  I love the huge window. 

 

 

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Here is a closeup picture of the kitchen.  The range is on the back wall set inside a mantel.  Notice the barn style door on the right leading outside.

 

 

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A guest room photographed for the book At Home With Country.  All the fabrics are Cabbages and Roses.

 

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The master bedroom is painted turquoise and features a bed made from antique pelmets.   Love this so much!!!

 

 

image The master bedroom.  The chest on the stand sold at auction, too, as did the chairs in the room.

 

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Aw, I love this!   The above picture of the master bedroom has been on the cover of a magazine before.  The sofa “makes” the room!   Why sell it for $6,700?   I guess they needed that money too! What a shame.

 

 

 imageThe late 17th century cabinet sold for over $16,000.   Now, that’s worth it to sell even though I love this piece in the bedroom too.

 

 

 

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One of the son’s bedroom has William and Morris wallpaper in it, along with a fabulous canopy bed.

 

 

 

 

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A photograph from a recent wedding held at Hanham Court. They matched with his gold pants and tie and her gold stripe trim at the hem of her dress.   

 

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this visit to Hanham Court.   To visit the Christie’s web site for the Hanham Court auction, go HERE.  To visit Hanham Court and the Bannerman’s Garden Design web site, go HERE.

 

 

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To order the book At Home With Country, go HERE. 

 

 

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The picture above is from Christina Strutt’s home in Bath, England, showing the red and pink fabric line from Cabbages and Roses. 

To visit Cabbages and Roses web site, go HERE.    And please, don’t forget to listen to Christina Strutt’s interview on The Skirted Roundtable,  HERE.  Tonight, we will be interviewing Bobby McAlpine.  Wish me luck!!!!

53 comments:

  1. That is an amazing place to live... WOW... I think I would love roaming those grounds... DIVINE!!!

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  2. Mon dieu.... What an absolutely amazing estate.
    The gardens are beautiful, breathtaking.
    You can sense the love they have for their home.
    What a shame they had to auction off all those beautiful items.

    Amazing post... THANK YOU!

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  3. I love it, especially the home in Bath, England with the red and pink fabrics, so beautiful! I could picture myself sitting there!

    Cindy

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  4. All of these images sent me over the edge...it started with the wisteria covered walls and I went spiraling down from there. I feel the need to read all of my saved Victoria magazines right NOW!

    Looking forward to listening on SRT and purchasing the book...thanks Joni!

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  5. Oh, I could rattle around in this house for ages. Those gardens! The pool in a snowfall! And that fabulous gothic cabinet. Sigh.

    The fireplace with the terra cotta bust on the grate reminded me a bit of Charleston... of Bloomsbury fame.

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  6. VERY romantic!!

    The Edwardian sofa is sending me spinning!! It seems so ahead of its time, almost has this deco vibe to it. Gorgeous!

    Can't wait to listen to SRT :)

    xoxo,

    Andrea

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  7. This almost left me speechlesss, would give my right arm (no, rather the left) to go through the things hidden away in the loft!

    Thanks and hi from
    Helle:))

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  8. Just another one of your beautifully done posts Joni. I love the tulips in the tub and that ornamental gate. The book cases I feel I could duplicate if I were so inclined. Thanks for sharing.

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  9. I have just the perfect hunk of gingham cloth....what an inspiring post. Wishing you luck and a visit there.
    pve

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  10. You write, "quite messy", I think it's deliciously quite SCRUFFY.

    The dependencies you showed? I'll bet they are stuffed to the gills with more antiques. Many, already moved into the manse & awaiting their turn at auction.

    Reminds me of a mini-Chatsworth in the era of its current dowager.

    Thanks, Joni, for intruducing this delight.

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

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  11. so beautiful ... what a delightful post thank you

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  12. I've had this "thing" about medievil architecture since reading "Pillars of the Earth" (of the same century). To see the evolution of this castle from church to home is so interesting, and the gardens are breathtaking. It's hard to imagine the span of the creative minds that envisioned these magical vingettes. Very beautiful!

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  13. WOW!

    Absolutely stunning!!

    Thank you,

    Tamra
    The Gilded Barn

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  14. Joni,
    These images are GORGEOUS!!! I could look over and over to these!!
    Fantastic post! And oh my goodness I love this furniture!
    Thank you for sharing!
    xx
    Greet
    PS Oh yes, I wish you good luck tonight!!

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  15. Those gardens are just amazing Joni~ wow! I would love to see it all in person.
    Great post.

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  16. Love this post!!! What an incredible home full of so many treasures. I especially love how you showed the rooms and then the auction listings. Very compelling to see the differences between the estimates and the realized prices. I agree it will be fascinating to see the house after they redo it. We will probably love it more less cluttered.

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  17. Love the rug on the dining room table and the bust in the fireplace. To much to see in a short visit. Will have to look again later. Beautiful post!
    Teresa (Splendid Sass)

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  18. wow! Those garden photos have my mind racing as I'm about to kick off my back yard renovation! What incredible grounds.
    It's amazing to imagine the generations of children who've played there, grown up there, grown old there....just the history imagined there is breath taking!

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  19. House and gardens are to die for...but what's a library without bookcases? Looks the they were already short of shelf space judging from the son's pile of books! Thanks for the in-depth look.

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  20. How absolutely wonderful! And that wisteria is to die for! What an amazing estate. Thank you so much for sharing these fabulous images and sharing a bit of the history.

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  21. Incredible posting -- simply the BEST! Thanks for all the hard work putting it together -- and what a gorgeous home! I would love to see it updated AFTER the auction! I wonder what surprises await in the gardens! Can you just imagine some of the glorious weddings there!

    Jan at Rosemary Cottage

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  22. Fascinating post ... from beginning to end!

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  23. I have never seen anything like it! I'm in love with the outside, and the interior architecture, of course! However, I'd like to run my arm across more than the mantle. I'll spring clean it and you can decorate it! Deal?

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  24. of courses I listened to this the minute it was up on SR. I love to listen when i am cooking or sewing (in this case sewing) Her work is gorgeous, and she is an inspiration and so humble about what she has accomplished. THANKS again for a great SR. --Gretchen

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  25. What a house, I mean castle. Amazing grounds and the wisteria in its splendor, a dream...even if I imagine would not be easy living there. Looking forward to hear McAlpine.

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  26. I couldn't get past the gardens. They are gorgeous. That wisteria. I'm so jealous. My wisteria had one bloom on it this year.
    The pool area is just stunning. I'm a sucker for an English garden.

    Can't wait for Bobby McAlpine!

    xo
    Brooke

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  27. Such a fantasy! I loved that old staircase- I wonder if those that walk on those steps today think about all of the footsteps that came before them.

    I keep hoping I will bump into you at Starbucks. We've been in Houston for 2 weeks now, and I'm still drowning in boxes!

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  28. The gardens were so lovely they made me want to cry!

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  29. I could be wrong but I don't think it was ever an actual castle. A castle would have once been occupied by a ruler and have had fortification, draw bridges and moats and those "walk ways" at the top where the soldiers would have parolled, and other such castle like get ups. I think the American definition of castle may be a bit different though, I'm a Brit. Amazing gardens, I don't know if there can be anywhere more beautiful in the word to get married! The pool in winter makes me think of the winter scenes in The Lion, THe Witch and Wardrobe.

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  30. I'm still strolling through the gardens. Simply beautiful. I just want to study them.

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  31. Joni, this is another amazing post. Thank you so much for all of your researching efforts. I always learn so much from your posts. Boy! They sure have a lot of stuff.

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  32. Stunning! Thanks so much for sharing. Greetings from Paris!

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  33. Dear Joni,
    Thank you for this most interesting post. That wisteria
    is so beautiful. There was a lot of Gothic looking rooms. I had a canopy bed like that geen one.
    This place is so huge, it is some undertaking. I really enjoyed this,
    thanks again.
    yvonne

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  34. I can't believe that there is that kind of place in our real world. I can only see that kind of wonderful place in fantasy movies. Thank you for sharing this amazing post.

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  35. WOW... These photos are so beautiful, they don't even seem REAL! Thanks for serving up a boatload of mouth-watering inspiration yet again.

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  36. Could you imagine being a little girl playing castles in that house?! What a divine place and I adore that red stripe lounge.
    Ness xx

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  37. Stunning! Thanks so much for sharing. Greetings from Paris!

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  38. Joni, this is a stunning post featuring a stunning house and garden! Thank you for sharing it with us.

    April

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  39. The gardens are stunning. The architecture is so fantastic, with the best part being the mix of centuries and styles. I loved seeing the riot of color in the gardens, as well as the house.

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  40. Your gardens are breathtaking; too bad those of us in the South will never be able to have that. But we can still lust after them!

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  41. Hi Joni,
    I just stumbled upon your blog and I have to say I am utterly speechless! What an enchanting place! I am breathless looking at the gardens and the Wisteria is magnificent! You are a new favorite of mine and I will surely be back to visit!
    xo
    Debi

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  42. Oh, the English blood in me just loves all the roses! There is nothing like visiting home and seeing my families gardens. It's breathtaking. I especially love that old distressed stairway!!! I'll have to show this post to my mom who absolutely loves English homes. Thanks Joni!

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  43. Where else have I seen that zinc tub this week? The images are swiftly swirling through the ether. This might be my favorite post ever, anywhere. I love those English people obsessing together about their magnificent houses. The gothic book cases literally made me gasp out loud. Thanks for the great post. Come take a peek at little us someday!

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  44. Joni, this is one of my favorite posts ever! Thank you! I absolutely agree about the clutter - I couldn't live with it, but it does seem to be part of the English country look.

    Did the Bannermans inherit the house with antiques, or did they buy it all? Also, I'm wondering if you know whether or not the gothic "towers" on either side of the red library fireplace open to reveal storage. I just can't get over how great the whole hearth surround is!

    Thanks again for such in depth coverage!

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  45. I love the pointy topiaries - beautiful gardens. These big old houses are a lot of work and responsibility, a real undertaking.

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  46. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  47. Interesting observation about the trend on English and Irish dark furniture. We always want a fresh look, it's a departure from all the painted furniture. Though I love my painted pieces, I still am drawn to my English Georgian pieces.

    Maine Antique Digest has had articles over the past year on auctions, and how "brown" furniture is quite a steal. It is food for thought!

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  51. Caption, fourth photo from the bottom: there is no such thing as "William and Morris" wallpaper. There are, however, William Morris wall coverings, named after the noted Arts and Crafts textile designer. And yes, that wall treatment looks very much like a William Morris design.

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  52. I could rattle around in this house for ages. Those gardens! The pool in a snowfall! And that fabulous gothic cabinet.

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  53. This article was extremely interesting, especially since I was searching for thoughts on this subject last week.

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