02 November 2012

NEWS ABOUT GINNY MAGHER

 

If any one designer epitomizes the look of Cote de Texas, it would be Ginny Magher from Atlanta, Georgia.  Ginny became well known when her two houses, one in Provence and one in Atlanta, were both featured in Veranda, Southern Accents and numerous other magazines starting in the late 1990s.   Her Provence house was so popular is was recently included in The Houses of Veranda by Lisa Newsom.

 

Remember this cover – showing a guest bedroom at Ginny’s gorgeous Provence farmhouse??  It had the oversized Manuel Canovas toile in black and white, mixed with blue!  How many bedrooms did this cover inspire? And notice the station clock, years and years before it became so trendy.

 

 

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A few years after the Provence house was published – this cover story featured Ginny’s Atlanta house – designed to resemble a “Hotel Particulier” one might see in Paris.  Just look at those Versailles patterned parquet floors and the French boiserie painted a soft celadon green. 

 

Magher’s two houses are all over pinterest, but still, I tried to find the prettiest and biggest pictures in my magazines and on the internet to show here – in one place – to celebrate the designer who epitomizes Country French décor.

 

PROVENCE – Mas de Baraquet:

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BEFORE:    How to you turn a ruin like this into a spectacular country vacation house?  You hire the best in the restoration business in France, for one thing:  Bruno LaFourcade, a self-taught architect, who, along with his wife and son, can transform the most rundown pile of stones into a magical place.   Here you can see two dovecotes on each side of the property, along with 4 plane trees that stand in front of the old farmhouse.

 

(a special thank you to blogger Trouvais for some of these scans!)

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And After:  Named Mas de Baraquet, the house looks out onto the front terrace shaded by four centuries-old plane trees.  I love the gate at the end of the graveled terrace.   And on the far right – notice the stone fountain?

 

 

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A close up of the stone fountain.   The restored dovecote is seen at the right.   How many people today use stone trough’s for fountains inspired by Ginny’s? 

 

 

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The terrace with its box and gravel – so French. 

 

 

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And another view of the front façade.  How many people were influenced with this house since it was first published 13 years ago?   The stucco, the blue shutters, the French pots filled with simple box balls, the lanterns, the iron balconies – so many elements that are found in upscale neighborhoods today. 

 

 

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Dining on the front terrace.  Notice the tall steel window/door – at what was once probably an entrance to the animal stalls and is now the orangery.

 

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The terrace set up for an afternoon meal under the large plane trees.  Ginny has her  studio in the dovecote.

 

 

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And looking the other direction – out towards the dovecote on the right.

 

 

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The front terrace, overlooking the farm land and mountain range.

 

 

 

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And later, the same field with lavender.  Other times the field is ablaze with sunflowers.

 

 

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One of the dovecotes as it looks today.

 

 

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BEFORE:  To the side of the mas is the beginnings of the pergola and the swimming pool.

 

 

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AFTER:  The pergola covered in vines and roses.

 

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Off the side of the pergola is the swimming pool.

 

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Larger view.

 

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The landscaping around the mas is so beautiful with all the clipped box and stone steps.

 

 

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A birthday party thrown for Ginny’s husband included dinner on the terrace.  So pretty!

 

 

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Close up of the candles in limes and pink roses. 

 

 

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Ginny’s husband Craig’s placesetting – with the specialized place card.

 

Ginny says:   "In the summer at our home, Mas de Baraquet, in Provence, we love to entertain on the terrace under our beautiful plantain trees. It is magic to be there looking out on the fields of wheat and sunflowers. When I dream of Provence, I dream of this setting. This particular evening, we were having a dinner party for my husband's 70th birthday. Friends came from all over the world to celebrate with us. With the help of my friend and florist, Sebastien from Celia Flor in Arles, our chef who prepares the most wonderful Provencal dishes, a local Jazz band from St. Remy and great wines from the region, it was a very magical evening indeed!!!"

 

 

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Inside the mas, the entry hall with the stone staircase.  Notice the painting above the desk and the sconces flanking it!!    Soooo beautiful. 

 

 

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A close up of the French desk and sconces.  It looks like a cartoon – a drawing made before a tapestry is created - above the desk. 

 

 

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The house is an enfilade – all rooms flow off each other in a row.  Here in the entry hall is the front door, then the study and further, the main salon with the red curtains and barometer. 

 

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And, off the foyer is the powder room, behind arched glass French doors.  The sink is marble from the 18th century.   The lantern and trumeau are sooo pretty!!

 

 

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The dining room with a crystal chandelier.  I love the fancy chandelier next to the rough beams on the ceiling.  Notice the bar through the arched door.   Ginny framed pieces of wallpaper to hang on the walls. 

 

 

 

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The former barn, with its steel doors, was transformed into an orangery.  Fabric by Le Manach. 

 

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The orangery is where breakfast is served, overlooking the front terrace.

 

 

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In the orangery – a set of framed dried herbs line the wall.

 

 

 

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The kitchen with the eat in breakfast room has ceiling beams painted white. 

 

 

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And another picture of the kitchen with its blue and white tiles and French antique tables and chairs.  The styling is Veranda 12 years ago.  Today, stylists are much less heavy handed.

 

 

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In another photoshoot, the table is covered with a white cloth.  Paintings and accessories are changed in this photo.

 

 

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At the opposite end of the kitchen is a sitting area with wicker chairs around a large fireplace.

 

 

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In the study is a marble fireplace with a beautiful antique French chair.

 

 

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At the end of the enfilade is the salon filled with French chairs and benches.  I love the way she painted the trim a dark gray.  Beautiful mirror.

 

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And at the other side of the room is the large stone fireplace with an antique barometer and a corner cabinet.

 

 

 

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This sitting room on the first floor is filled with traditional red checked fabrics and a French bench. 

 

  sunny ochre and oxblood red tiled bathroom blends farmhouse charm with graphic sophistication

Upstairs is a bright yellow and red tiled bathroom.

 

 

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This bedroom has a beautiful blue and white toile draped iron bed and antique screen. 

 

 

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Blue and white tiles in this bathroom and an antique chaise.

 

 

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This gorgeous bedroom has twin beds set in an alcove.  Notice the darling urns on the wall.  Another antique screen sits above a French bench.  Just gorgeous!!!

 

 

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The charming bathroom is decorated in matching fabrics.  Notice the monogrammed towel:  Mas de Baraquet.

 

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Ginny says this antique French bed is too short for an adult!  Draped in Le Manach fabric, its window overlooks the terrace.

 

 

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And the famous Manuel Canovas toile draped bed.  Love the chairs and ottoman in the stripe.   So many cute bedrooms! 

 

 

ATLANTA:

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Ginny’s former Atlanta house was featured in a cover story in Veranda.   While the house is French inspired, it was built to resemble a Parisian townhouse instead of a Provence farmhouse.  Why copy a French farmhouse when you have the real thing?

 

 

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The Magher’s sold the house to another couple, who then also sold it a few years later.  This picture was taken from that real estate brochure.  Here, a stone staircase, just like at Mas de Baraquet.    The stairs wrap around the front door. 

 

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Unfortunately, I only have a few pictures of the living room – as furnished by Ginny.  Note:  In the corner is her antique sedan chair.  It is beyond fabulous!!!   Above the paintings is a French barometer. 

 

 

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And across the room is this picture of the French sofa.  

 

 

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Here’s a closeup of the wall behind the sofa, filled with gilt framed paintings, dishes, gorgeous sconces, intaglios, and a carving.   Each piece is so beautiful!

 

 

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The dining room with the gorgeous Versailles patterned parquet floors.  The paneling is to die for!!!   So beautiful!!!  So is her chandelier.   And her curtains are like ball gowns. 

 

 

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Another view shows the marble fireplace with a trumeau above it.  The trumeau was built into the paneling – it came with the house and the new owner has it now!  Lucky!!

 

 

 

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Here is the library under Ginny – warm and  masculine, perfection!  It’s interesting to see the library under the new owners – it looks like they bought some of the furniture – so the room should look just as good, right?

 

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The tole chandelier remained, as did the sofas and chairs, but without the pillows – the sofa looks flat.  And the shelves, again, notice how fabulous Ginny’s shelves look.  These don’t have near the pizzazz.  Notice the vignette in the hallway – Ginny’s is eye catching with the portrait and the bright white dishes, the new owner’s vignette seems dull by comparison.   The rug too makes a big difference – as does the coffee table.   Mostly though, it’s the shelves, the portrait and the pillows that are missing and missed.  Study Ginny’s shelves – the white gives it all a pop and draws the eye there.  Same with the vignette and the pillows.  

 

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This is the new owner’s décor, but I wanted you to see the family room, how lovely the room and its fireplace is.  Love the armoire doors made into a built in cabinet.  Great idea!

 

 

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Bad scan – but this is how Ginny decorated the room.  Lavender walls mix with mustard fabrics and lavender checks and toiles.  

 

 

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And the opposite side of the family room, the kitchen.  Notice Ginny used the same terracotta tiles she has in Provence.  I love how Ginny separated the two refrigerators and notice the stained door leading to the butler’s pantry.  Ginny didn’t use chandeliers, these were added by the new owners.

 

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I had to show you the bar that Ginny designed with armoire styled doors and paneling. 

I wish I had all the pictures from the Veranda spread, but I saved the tearsheets and now I can’t find them!!!  Urrrggh.

 

 

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  Ginny’s bedroom is beyond dreamy.  One fabric covers everything!  Beautiful trumeau and French chairs.  And the Leontine linens are gorgeous, as always.  The Lit Polonaise bed is certainly a show stopper.  It makes the room more cozy and filled out. 

 

 

 

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A close up of the bed.   Stunning!

 

 

 

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The new owners were left with half a bedroom.  The curtains remained and it looks like the bench and settee was sold with the house, along with the trumeau.  But the rug is really not right at all, and the bed, well – I so miss Ginny’s Lit Polonaise.  I do love the nude above the bed.   I have to say, the bedroom under Ginny was so fabulous!!  Isn’t the architecture of the room stunning?  The door leads out to the backyard. 

 

 

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And look how Ginny decorated her master bathroom.  Gorgeous chandelier, mixed with a checked settee – blue painted trumeau and blue shades mixed with blue and white porcelains.  Beautiful vanity.  So pretty!!!

 

 

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The basement is so large – look at this wine cellar that leads off the staircase.   This really does look like Provence with the tiled floors!

 

 

 

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The back of the house – is interesting in there is no pool, just a pond.   On the wing at the right is the master bedroom.  

 

 

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Even without a pool, there is a pool house with a stone fireplace. 

 

 

 

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Beautiful fireplace and notice the doors and the trumeaus over them.  I love how it’s painted gray with blue on the ceilings.

 

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There is even a pergola, just like the one in Provence!

To see more of Ginny’s designs, check out her facebook page HERE.

AND BE SURE TO VISIT ONE KING’S LANE

starting on November 4:

 

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On November 4th at 8am, the Ginny Magher Interiors Tastemaker Sale will begin on One Kings Lane. The sale will feature an exquisite personal collection of French Antiques, including one of a kind items such as a Toiletries Case belonging to the 20th century art collector and decorator Charlie de Beistegui and an 18th century restored carriage that belonged to the Duchesse d'Orleans.

 

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Here is the carriage being photographed for the One King’s Lane sale!!! Wow!!!  How cool is that?  It would make a cute place for a telephone, like an old fashioned booth.   Remember this carriage was in the corner of her living room at her former house!

 

 

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And here is Ginny Magher herself – sitting in her restored carriage.  I love the fabric she used inside it! 

 

To purchase The Houses of Veranda which features Ginny’s Provence farmhouse, just click below:

I hope you’ve enjoyed this look at Ginny Magher’s designs as much as I did!

Until next time….

 

71 comments:

  1. Another great post. I love the farmhouse in France, such great furniture, fabrics. Lots of eye candy!
    Karen

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  2. Beautiful! I love reading your blog post they are always such a treat! Thank you for compiling everything in one place and for all the background information!

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    1. Joni so much to see. Ginny has exquisite taste; so much of it ahead of the times. Of course she is a beauty herself!

      xoxo
      Karena
      Art by Karena
      2012 Artists Series

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    2. "... so much of it ahead of the times."

      How do you figure, Karen?

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    3. I think she means that this one house really inspired so many of the French styled houses you see in the south. imo. I remember it made a huge impact on people when it was published. can't remember another one of these houses like this being published before.

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  3. It's lovely but almost too over the top. I suppose if I were rolling in money to the point where I didn't know what to do with it I might feel differently but they both seem like movie sets to me (the french house being an absolutely stunning set). Having said that, I suppose I would take it if someone twisted my arm! It's just lacking a soul but makes for gorgeous pictures. The Atlanta house is nice but a little "meh". I love the picture of her though - very Dallas chic!

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  4. The "plates on the wall' thing cracks me up. That is so overdone that it has become silly.

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    1. become silly? this was over 13 years ago!

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    2. You're right...a and most of the recent homes you show still have them. Does anyone have an original idea?

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    3. People have used plates on the wall for centuries both for decoration and for the more practical purpose of storage. They are also a nice way to add geometric shapes in a traditional setting. Historically, many of these plates and other serving pieces such as trays were decorated by women in the household for artistic expression. The idea will never go out of style in a traditionally decorated space.

      Since when was this blog exclusively about original ideas. Is it not about French Design in Houston?

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  5. Beautiful!! Even without your tearsheets, there were many pictures that I had never seen before. Thank you for such a wonderful blog. I always look forward to seeing what eye candy you have for us.
    Dolores

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  6. Very beautiful photos. Each home is outstanding and a true treat to be able to see. Thanks for sharing.

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  7. Once again, Joni, an exquisite post and a great way to start my day. I have to respectfully disagree with the above comment that these homes are over the top. I usually have a low threshold for over-done decorating but going through the pictures of the French home, I kept thinking that this is what a home should be. It is decorated, but so welcoming. Wouldn't you feel comfortable walking into that home, kicking off your shoes and curling up on a sofa to share a cup of espresso and a stimulating conversation? Isn't that what our homes are meant for? Maybe because so many of the photos were styled for entertaining that I can't help feeling that the owners want to share their home with their friends and family. Do I love every detail? No, but the overall feel of the French home, especially, is something to emulate. And how comforting to see examples of not one, but two well done homes that endure a decade of trends. I just reupholstered an antique chair in black and white striped fabric and am now re-thinking how I want to use it. One more room inspired by that Veranda cover! Thanks again.

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  8. I loved reading about GM + seeing the new owners pictures compared with the originals. Grand post. I'd snap up that carriage, what a great piece. xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

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  9. HI Joni thanks for this wonderful beautiful post about my favorite subject! I think my favorite is the dining room with the celadon walls... so gorgeous and restrained but fresh palette! Would Ginny mind if we invited ourselves for "un petit cafe" on that terrace in Provence? :) xoxo Kit

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  10. "If any one designer epitomizes the look of Cote de Texas"

    Did you really say that? Not a slipcover anywhere but beautiful fabrics with wonderful detailing. This was a great post for those who love French design. Obviously Ginny's style is French on steroids, but by the end of the post, I was hoping to see a little variety and more continental pieces appearing in the photos. I especially love the soft and soothing colors that seem to pervade her rooms. I also loved the study in the Atlanta home and felt the critical remarks about the bookcases of the new owners a bit picky and unproductive. The new owner created a beautiful and warm space and has used the bookcases to showcase things that are meaning to to him/her, not just a bunch of bought stuff devoid of history.

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  11. Oo-la-la! French on steriods - my kind of design. Now if we only had the millions of dollars it would take to recreate these looks. Out here in California, the crushed rock for the driveway alone would cost at least $2,000 to $3,000. (Sigh!)

    Thank you for posting something so French. I plan to print up and save this ENTIRE post.

    :) Charlotte

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  12. WOw, I kep that Verand issue just for that article on her! I was so enchanted with that home and that masterbath was always one of my favorite!! So beautifully done!! SHe has amazing taste!

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  13. Joni, this is absolutely breathtaking. I'm speechless. I've seen her designs before in the magazines, and I thought then, as I do now, perfection. I don't even know where to start, so I will leave it at the fact that I love everything this lady does from the colors to the antiques to the stunning blend of it all.

    I am going to steal that daybed in the Le Manach (sp) fabric. I think I could make myself very tiny to fit in it. ;-)

    She is gorgeous, too. And what a lifestyle!

    Thank you for this. I needed an escape today, and this did the trick.

    XO,

    Sheila

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  14. Oh Joni, I would die if I lost my issue of Veranda with Ginny's Provence photos! They have been on the top of my dream file for many years. What a gracious and talented eye she has. Thanks for sharing these beautiful images. Best wishes.

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    1. I have the issue, but the pages are gone! i'm sure they are in my tearsheets, but when I redid my office, those are missing somewhere. so.....yeah. I need to rebuy the magazine from ebay.

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  15. The STEEL DOORS...OMG!!! franki

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  16. I think I just crashed my Pinterest with this post! LOL!

    Thanks, Joni! I loved every second of it!

    Andie

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  17. Replies
    1. Yup, that's all you need and you too can be a "top designer" with a home in Provence. I feel nauseous just thinking about it. Having said that, it's a nice house.

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    2. Then feel free not to think about it.

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    3. A bit of a childish remark don't you think, Denise. You may want to comment over at Sesame Street.

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. "I feel nauseous"

      You mean "I feel nauseated."

      "I feel nauseous" means you feel you are capable of making other people want to vomit.

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    6. well, I feel nauseated reading how rude you are to other posters.

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  18. Hello from Birmingham, AL!!
    First, have loved your blog for years. Second, I remember a few years ago I was looking online and I came across her carriage listed on ATL Craigslist! I knew it was hers because of my Veranda subscription. It obviously never sold off of CL.
    Thanks for your fun information as usual.
    Hayley Young

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  19. Gorgeous -- I love Ginny's interiors. I'm 99% sure the fabric inside that carriage is from Braquenie/Pierre Frey. If it isn't theirs, then they have one that is almost identical and absolutely exquisite!

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  20. Both houses are lovely. If the second one was my house, it would get a pool asap. The pond is nice but it just looks like there's supposed to be a pool there.

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  21. I think that I just spent a few minutes in heaven. Every single detail of these houses is perfect. I've saved your complete post.
    Once again, thank you for reminding me that great design is alive and well.
    Mary

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  22. WOW. Her houses are beyond fabulous. Thanks for showcasing her amazing style. Just like a dream so beautiful.

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  23. Hi Joni,
    Ginny's homes and work has been a favourite of mine for years as well.
    She's so talented, an amazing decorator with a great eye for detail ....and ..... she gorgeous looking as well!
    I so look forward to seeing her new venture, I'm sure it will be heavenly, thanks for sharing this information and these amazing photographs.
    Sending love from down under!
    x Coty

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  24. MERCI!!!Joni this was a fabulous beautiful post! I will definitely hit the tastemakers tag sale for Ginny. I wish I kept my old issues of Veranda- this made me decide to buy the book I remember some of these pictures and they are DREAMY! Great job!

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    Replies
    1. Joni, as always a wonderful post! Ginny's work seems to have a timeless look...which I love!

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  25. Swoon! I have a framed photo of the external shot of Mas de Baraquet on my wall at home and tried to create the essence of it (don't laugh) on my humble balcony. I painted chairs and table the same colour as the shutters and have similar planters with topiary. I will never, never tire of that picture. What a treat this post has been for me as I am fascinated by that house and have enjoyed seeing her other properties today.

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  26. There are so many beautiful pictures and pieces! I can find so much that I would love to have in our home from each and every single image. While reading your posts I think I learn new terms and gather a little more knowledge of an area that is so intriguing and still somewhat new to me (even though I have been reading your blog for a long time). Thank you for once again sharing with us the love of design, the personality of the homeowners and a little bit of relaxation and whimsy for many of us!

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  27. She has always been one of my favourites.
    I was lucky to see inside one of her first homes way back in the 80's.
    A tiny little horse farm in the middle of forested Atlanta.
    I still dream of that house. It was absolute perfection!
    And Joni, thanks so much for your beautiful feature on my book last week!
    You are a gem. Absolute perfection yourself!
    xo
    p

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  28. This Anglophile clearly has a little Francophile in her! I didn't think I liked things too 'Frenchified' but that house in Provence takes my breath away. Ginny Magher, you are a gorgeous lady with wonderful style. Thank you for a beautiful post, Joni.

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  29. Lovely post, Joni. I love the ceiling beams. If there was one thing I could do to my home, it would be to add beams.

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  30. can i be one of ginny's friends, if for a moment?
    lovely beyond words
    debra

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  31. Took a look at her Facebook photos. Is she selling the carriage?! Guess we will know tomorrow.

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  32. Congratulations on a fantastic post!

    What an eye this woman has! Absolutely everything is exquisite, warm, cozy and happy!

    Thank you for this huge effort! This post is a total "keeper"!

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  33. Drip...drool.....slobber....hiccup......Turning GREEN with envy is a very unpleasant experience *winks* Vanna

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    1. I know that's suppose to be humorous, but it's just gross. I've seen others put similar things when they're overwhelmed with awesomeness, but
      surely there's a less disgusting way of conveying your joy. ;)

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    2. Since when is "awesomeness" a word?

      As to Ivrofiques, I agree. She sounds like she comments a lot at MFAMB.

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    3. "She sounds like she comments a lot at MFAMB."

      All you need to do that is a stick and some dirt.

      Delete
  34. This is clearly an American with "good taste's" interpretation of a farmhouse in the countryside. The furniture is inappropriate and too much.
    It is lovely but too much. Very Parisian, like a mini Versailles stuck inside a farmhouse. It betrays a failure to understand
    the land she's is living on. I say this as an Italian who has seen much of the same happen in my country, mostly by Brits and Americans, now
    with more Russians. Each has their own, slightly different interpretation of Tuscan or Umbrian. It is without soul because it is not connected
    to the place. That is my opinion. Oh and the Furniture is a little too large.

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    1. I couldn't agree with you more. My mother lives in Tuscany and the Brits & Americans do exactly as you say with the old farmhouses. There's nothing organic about them, they look more like a foreigner's fantasy of Tuscany and nothing to do with the actual place. And I say this as an American.

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  35. "It is lovely but too much."

    Then you should take a Klonopin, wait an hour, and come back when you've calmed down.

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  36. Haha. Let the attacks begin. English is not my first language, but just scream over everyone else and don't try to understand my point. Very American. Time to find another blog. Too many angry Americans and velvet pumkins. Ta!

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    1. You misunderstood. You were supposed to wait an HOUR, not a minute.

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  37. what a mixture of ornate and rustic, I have to agree with the above comments.....too much , could be more in the stlye of the countryside and the local custom of reflecting the outdoors with simplicity.

    not exactly a in your face house....but close.

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    1. Based upon recent "bait and switch" posts, it might be difficult to tell how many of these pictures actually represent the owner's possessions. Many of these rooms may have been Veranda props brought in for the photo shoot. Faux photography seems to be getting the covers pulled back a bit.

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  38. Wow.....money well spent!! We all have our particular weaknesses....amid all that spendor it was the wrought iron that kept it human...there is something about it that dresses either up or down.... the staircases were so different...but each so beatiful.

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  39. It all just looks so heavy, so overdone and so dated. Not my cup of tea at all.

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  40. I always enjoy looking at homes - one reason I enjoy the New York Social Diary "HOUSE" section so much is to get a peek into real peoples homes. They photograph the stuff on the night tables, closets, bathrooms...all the good, bad - it is fun! I have seen the photos of Ginny's home in France many times. It is well done...but so, kind of, predictable. I just want to see something out of place - something that makes me think...who is she??? I guess I don't see much depth. I know this was all a magazine spread so it is styled. But I also think, jeez, she must be some kind of perfectionist, too! Things can be too perfect - then it turns in to a bore.

    Also, I have shopped Kings Lane. But, heads up - at times the prices are very inflated!!!

    Joni, thank you for your interesting blogs - I always have to check Cote de Texas first thing and I have told soooo many people aboout your great blog! I was telling some fellow designers about your blog and Skirted Round Table last summer - ran into them recently and they are addicted to both!

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  41. Over the top decorating, again! I just feel like it's the "same ol, same ol". How about homes that are not about just filling up every corner with expensive items, but having a few high end mixed in with the lower end so that they stand out a little more? Again, it's someone with too much money looking for ways to spend it decorating.
    Cora

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  42. The giant feet on that bathtub!!! WTH?

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  43. What beautiful houses! The bed is short because in the eighteenth century, people used to sleep propped up. I heard that this had something to do with the fact that lying flat was associated with death! In Voltaire's chateau in France, for example, the bed is very short.

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  44. I'm not saying this to be rude-- only speaking for my personal taste, but I have to say that this type of house is the reason I stopped subscribing to Traditional Home. All that stuff filling up a showplace that just doesn't seem to have much to do with a person's life as opposed to creating a home for family... I feel like the pages were just constantly filled with this kind of a house, although in different styles and I grew tired of them. House Beautiful has houses that are just as out of my budget range, but maybe less grand, more soul. Can't quite put my finger on it. I still enjoyed your commentary on the details, though, and yes, there are certainly a lot of pretty things in those homes! You always give a good read!

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  45. The Provence house makes me weep. In a dream, it's exactly what I'd imagine my perfect world to be! Terrifc post, Joni!

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  47. Really amazing post....thanks for sharing this great info!! Plastic cards


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  48. I used to work for Craig Magher when they were refurbishing Mas de Baraquet and building their Atlanta home. Ginny is a master and they are truly one of the classiest couples I have ever known. I think her French inspired design is stunning and I know how much effort went into these homes; absolutely inspired and gifted designing.

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