26 December 2013

In Memoriam

 

I know everyone is busy with Christmas and family, but this slipped by me somehow and I just couldn’t not pay a proper respect to Mr. Charles Faudree.  The famed interior designer from Tulsa, Oklahoma passed away from a long bout with cancer this past November 28.  He was just 75 years old.  

 

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Charles Faudree – always dapper, and always surrounded by his Cavalier, King Charles Spaniels

 

The former mayor of Tulsa, Kathy Taylor – also a client -  said of Faudree, his eyes were full of deep kindness and he always had a smile on his face.   "When you were with Charles, you always thought you were the only person in his life at that moment," Taylor said, "he would put himself and his incredible talent aside and really focused on making you feel like a great friend and a great person."

Charles Faudree started out teaching art and selling furniture in Dallas, Texas.  His career in interior design came about when he designed his sister Francie’s house in Tulsa – he was 38 years old at the time.  For many – it was his long relationship with Traditional Home magazine that brought him national acclaim.

Faudree was known for this Country French aesthetic.  Over the years he stayed true to his love of French antiques, furniture, and accessories.   His designs were layered, the more the better, and featured the finest of Provencal.  

 

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He wrote six books – his first “Charles Faudree’s Country French Signature,” is now in its 9th printing and has sold over 60,000 copies.  Amazing.  All of his books are filled with houses he has designed through the years and his own numerous homes.   When he sprang on the scene, Faudree’s look was pure Country French – with blue, red, and yellow fabrics in toiles and checks.

In the 2000s – Faudree started adding Swedish pieces to his French – and his designs took on a much a lighter look than his previous aesthetic.   This shift showed that Faudree changed with the times and made his look relevant to younger clients.

Faudree was a known philanthropist.  Just this past March, he was the guest of honor at Tulsa CARES’ 15th annual Red Ribbon Gala, of which he was a founding member.   He was also known for his love of Cavaliers, King Charles Spaniels.   His dogs graced  many of his book covers.

His survivors included his partner, Bill Carpenter, and his sister, Francie Faudree Gillman.

 

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This house by Charles Faudree was his own and it was the one that Traditional Homes featured which made him a national star.  The living room was double sized with a table in the middle and two matching fireplaces on each side.  Notice the beautiful French chests flanking the archway.  Faudree filled his houses with these types of Provencal antiques.  I was obsessed with this house and thought the floor plan was fabulous.  I studied every corner and every accessory.  He became my favorite designer overnight.   

Faudree moved shortly after this house was published.  I remember thinking – why?  It was such a perfect house!  Little did I know that he moved all the time – and indeed  he lived in countless houses during his lifetime!   Some furniture went with him from house to house, while others he left behind. 

 

 

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One side of his living room with the beautiful French mantel.

 

 

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The dining room was actually on a back hall alcove.  A French sofa was used instead of chairs on one side.  Above is a tole chandelier.

 

 

 

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Faudree was known for his kitchens – which he often wallpapered and dressed up with accessories as he would any other room.

 

 

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He loved symmetry and blue and white plates.  Here – his collection of blue and white porcelains hang surrounded by an antique French barometer.

 

 

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Checks were a favorite – in red and white and blue and white.  He used the same fabrics over and over again, Pierre Frey and Bennison were favorites. 

 

 

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Faudree at his best – blue and white checks with this favorite fabric Petit Parc by Pierre Frey in blue.

 

 

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This house designed by Faudree was another double living room with fireplaces on each end.  Here the dining room table was on one side while the living area was on the other.   Louis XV and XVI styled chairs were used with Provencal tables and upholstered sofas.  Stripes and checks were used, along with muted floral patterned fabrics.

 

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Another view of the same house. 

 

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The family room in the same house – next to the kitchen. 

 

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The bedroom features a four poster bed in Chelsea Edition fabrics.  Beautiful fireplace and desk with clock.  Notice how all the rooms blend together in one cohesive design.

 

 

 

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Another view of the same bedroom.

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A fancy French bathroom for the more casual bedroom seen above.   The bathroom is dressier than the bedroom!  This  house was shown in a large spread in Veranda.

 

 

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I love this house that Faudree designed in the Caribbean which was also featured in Veranda.  He used a large Suzani fabric and bold stripes, which was a departure for Faudree.  He loved to use sample sized chairs in his rooms – like this charming one in a blue and white ikat.

 

 

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A view of the other side of the living room with more blue and white fabrics and black hardwood floors.

 

 

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The dining room is a stunning collection of shells and antique books – with gleaming black hardwoods and mirrored chests.

 

 

 

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The bedroom featured reproduction antiques.  At Faudree’s shop in Tulsa, he sold beautiful chair frames which would be either stained or painted and then upholstered.   I used to drool over pictures of his chair frames and dream about clients who would let me purchase them!

 

 

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This living room made the cover of one of his books.  It signaled a shift in his aesthetic at the time  - white walls?   And it showcased new fabrics that quickly became favorites such as the damask and the cut velvet pillow fabric.

 

 

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These two chairs are made from frames sold in Faudree’s shop.  Love these!

 

 

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A French bedroom – done by the best.

 

 

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This was a bedroom Faudree did for a young couple in Houston!  He used a favorite toile stripe on the walls.

 

 

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And he filled the bedroom with painted antiques.

 

 

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And more painted chests and tufted chairs.

 

 

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This was another house Faudree lived in for a while.   It featured a beautiful French mantel and tall bergeres in a taupe damask.  These two chairs showed up in house after house.  Faudree also used this chair a lot for clients.

 

 

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Looking at the side of the same living room, here is a painted chest and the surprise of a glass coffee table!

 

 

 

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And a view towards the dining room.  Another surprise – upholstered slipper chairs.  Faudree loved antique French barometers and used them to anchor wall displays.

 

 

 

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The same dining room with printed fabric curtains.  Love the tole clock.

 

 

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In this entrée in a Faudree house – an enfilade is the focal point.  This painted piece was owned by Faudree and then he sold it to a client who later sold it back to Faudree. 

 

 

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This Faudree house is another favorite.  His sister Francie bought him the sample sized chair in front of the painted coffee table – which is from Faudree’s furniture line.  Notice the tole clock from the previous dining room.  These sconces moved from house to house with Faudree.  The fabric seen throughout this room is Florentine Damask by Beaumont and Fletcher.

 

 

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The two chairs flanking the fireplace were used in the previous living room.   Faudree said this drapery treatment was one of his favorite.

 

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In yet another Faudree house, this living room featured the wing chairs in Petit Parc and a large check in blue and white.  These sconces were seen in house after house.   Faudree loved tole chandeliers and used them in many projects.

 

 

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In another room of Faudree’s – here is yet another tole chandelier.   As in the picture above – he liked to use gate leg tables in front of sofas.

 

 

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One of the Faudree’s last residences- featured a French day bed that sat in front of the fireplace.

 

 

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The familiar sconces appear here as do the familiar bergeres in the damask.  A stunning collection of tortoise shell boxes sit atop the tea table.

 

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The view in the opposite direction.  This house shows a mature Faudree with a more eclectic approach to design. 

 

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Close up of the antique mirror and painted chest. 

 

 

 

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Besides his many houses, Faudree had numerous vacation homes he all named The Roost.  There were many Roosts – not just one.  After many years in Oklahoma, he finally ended up with a Roost in the Cashiers.   Here, a published Roost – in bleached woods and blue and white checks and Petit Parc fabric on the walls.  The portrait over the fireplace moved from house to house.

 

 

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In the past decade, Faudree had begun to add Swedish influences into his designs.   This Roost was a favorite of mine!  Love it!

 

 

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His favorite Petite Parc print on two wing chairs.

 

 

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Here he added a French day bed in ticking.

 

 

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I loved this version of the Roost – with the huge tapestry and blue and white checks mixed with white painted furniture.

 

 

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Another Roost with the same antique coffee table and the French sofa and chairs from Faudree’s line.  The portrait of the girl hangs to the left of the sofa.

 

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Close of the painted chest and the small portrait which Faudree said he loved.

 

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And another Roost dining room – with toile curtains and a painted enfilade.

 

 

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This Swedish secretary was used in several Roost houses. 

 

 

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And here it is again used in a different Roost – a study in symmetry.

 

 

 

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This Roost bedroom was a study in black and white.  These two chairs are from his furniture line.

 

 

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Another Roost bedroom with his collection of dog prints.

 

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And on the other side of the bedroom with another beautiful oil.

 

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A laundry room was taken out to make a small bedroom.  Faudree said he didn’t know how to do the laundry – so why would he need a laundry room?  Love the needlepoint pillow announcing The Roost!

 

 

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I love Faudree’s vignettes – the chests and chairs in the corners with mirrors and lamps and tablescapes.

 

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Here he used a French baker’s table for a makeshift bar.

 

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A painted chest, a mirror and plates – Faudree could do this arrangement blindfolded.

 

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He always seemed to find the perfect painted piece, the perfect mirror and the perfect accessory.

 

 

 

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Faudree was known for his bathrooms and closets.  Always, symmetry prevails.  I love that huge perfume bottle!

 

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Another bathroom – showcases his love of Napoleon, toile and painted Provencal furniture. 

 

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A newer version of his powder room – with a contemporary wallpaper and painted console.

 

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Have an extra antique barometer?  Hang it over the toilet!  Faudree would and did!

 

 

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Charles Faudree with his beloved Cavalier, King Charles Spaniel.   I will miss this man. 

Read a previous written story about Faudree HERE.

 

Here are links to Faudree’s six books, on Amazon.  To order, just double  click on the picture.