13 May 2014

Katie Stassi Scott


Back in 2008, interior designer Katie Stassi made news when she was named one of domino magazine’s Top Ten Designers. Her house in Houston, which she totally renovated and decorated, was an internet sensation and placed her on the national design scene, which attracted domino, amongst others.

Before the days of Pinterest, photographs of her house would have been some of the most pinned pics of the year, no doubt. There was a tremendous buzz about Katie’s work, and the projects and accolades flooded in.


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Katie of Katie Design

Besides being a talented and very beautiful woman, Katie is also well grounded and very spiritual. When asked by domino where her she was trained in interior design – she answered simply, “it was a gift from God.” And, without a doubt it is.


Katie’s spirituality permeates every aspect of her life. Her daily dialogue with God became the basis of a book entitled “Let It Be” which has just been published. “Let It Be” is a diary of sorts – a remembrance of her days and how her religion has helped her navigate life’s trials.


The book is a retelling of a trying time in her life which, she pulled through and ended up happy and healthy – in a marriage to her “soul mate” and with two new babies, giving her a total of 3 girls and one boy.


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“Let It Be” is highly inspirational. Writing about your personal relationship with God can’t be easy, but Katie describes her meditations in such an open way, you will be inspired to follow her journey of prayer with your own. She posts the outline of her meditation time HERE for those who are interested in creating their own meditation time.


I loved the book especially as there is such a happy ending!! But then I’ve always be in awe of Katie. She is just the whole package – and she makes it all look so easy. Reading the book, you realize that it really hasn’t been that easy of a road – and this inspires you to want to work harder at your own spiritual life and make your own prayers more important in your life.
To order “Let It Be,” go HERE.



Katie Stassi Scott first came into the national eye with this project:


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Her house in Houston – was published in several magazines. Katie totally renovated the house, inside and out.




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The living room was light and airy – with touches of gilt. It was a mix of modern and antique – a mix she still employs.




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A closeup of the demilune.




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Gilt antique chairs. I remember just loving this vignette! Still do!




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And in the corner, a ticking fabric on an antique French day bed. Love.




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The dining room featured antique furniture and a trumeau with beautiful gray silk taffeta curtains.





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Everyone loved her breakfast room with its turquoise slipcovered banquette and the matching trumeau. All these years later I still love this design just as much as the first time I saw it!




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Her tent created an instant pool room. I think every design blog showed this picture.




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Next, this house was featured in a Houston magazine and then last year was published in Country French.




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The stair hall with its French barometer.




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The story behind this house is as wonderful as the design. The owner, a single mother of 4 girls, bought the house and had it decorated in dark colors and stains, along with checks and toile fabrics. On the day before the move in and installation – the owner decided it was too country French and too dark. A few phone calls to friends brought her to Katie who spent the next few years totally lightening the interiors and redecorating the house to reflect a more sophisticated French-European look.



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The living room is filled with antiques. My favorite is the fireplace and the flanking consoles and mirrors.



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Close up of the putti on the console.





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Katie used two antique sofas in the living room, along with ivory taffeta curtains.




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The capital seems almost normal now – but back then, I was enthralled with it. Still am.




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The dining room is so beautiful with the light blue taffeta curtains and the crystal chandelier.



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This chest and trumeau are gorgeous. You can see a painting of an angel reflected in the mirror.



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The family room – from Katie’s web site.




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The family room as seen by Tria Giovan in Country French magazine.




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The study – love all the white books.



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The kitchen with its stone walls.



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And next to it – the breakfast room. Love!



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The master bedroom is all blue and white. Such a pretty chandelier.



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There are four daughters and all have beautiful bedrooms. This one has antique French twin beds.




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This peach bedroom was a surprise in the Country French magazine.



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Another view shows the beautiful windows in the room.


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Another bedroom in blues and pinks.  So cute!



Newer Project:


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This is a newer project in New Orleans. The walls in the entry hall are white and the hardwoods are dark brown. Love the modern fabric on the antique chaise. The sconces and mirror above are beautiful but the chandelier is STUNNING! The story behind this house is most intriguing.


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Another view. The moldings are so beautiful in this house.
This is actually the famous Lalaurie house, built in 1831, in New Orleans. It has a haunted past. Its original owner, Madame Delphine Lalaurie, tortured and murdered her slaves that she held captive here. The abuse was discovered when there was a fire at the house. The description of the poor souls found here is hard to read, even all these years later.


While historical records indicate the torture took place in an outbuilding on the property, the house is considered haunted. Katie collected a bottle of holy water and used it each time she entered the house along with saying a prayer for those tortured here.


It’s hard to reconcile the past with how beautiful and graceful the house is today. The actor Nicholas Cage once owned the house, and today, Katie’s client, a Houston oil man, lives here part time.
The Visual Vamp featured this house HERE.  Also, a feature about the project will soon be published. Additionally, Katie won a Design Award from Paper City magazine for her design here.
Read the story about the house and Katie’s involvement in it HERE.


Read the original news story about the fire and the tortured slaves HERE.


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The living room has a fuchsia pink antique sofa mixed with blush pink taffeta curtains. LOVE!


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Another view. Notice the moldings around the door and the etched glass trumeau. Just beautiful!!




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The dining room has more wonderful molding and chandelier. The table comes from Katie’s own furniture line – as seen on her web site.  Also, the chairs are covered in a python fabric.



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Another view – notice the molding on the door at the very right.



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The door to the study. How gorgeous is this? Only in New Orleans!



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Here, in the study, a mix of green tufted chaises. Again these are found on her web site.




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One of the bedrooms in the house. Katie named this The Heaven Room. Watch what she says about this room HERE.



And finally – besides her furniture line, Katie is now designing jewelry. Her line is inspired by her faith, as you will see. Yet, regardless of its religious nature – the jewelry is so chic and hip! My daughter Elisabeth will go crazy for the cuff with the Jewish Star and Evil Eye – shown below! I’m loving the starburst white cuff for summer.




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Her rings – again, I’m in love with the gold starburst ring:

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I know Elisabeth will want the Hamsa ring – or the Rosary Bar ring on the left.

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The ring on the left of the Mother Mary in the diamond bezel is another favorite of mine. The cross rings are really great too.


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Here a model wears Katie’s bangles, along with rings and earrings and a necklace from her line.


Be sure to check out Katie’s web site for more of her jewelry. A portion of the proceeds goes to her favorite charities, which she talks about there.

Jewelry: HERE


To read about her book, “Let It Be,” go HERE 


And Katie Scott’s web site is

www.katiebydesign.com



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A HUGE thank you to Katie Scott for allowing me to showcase her designs and to talk about her new book –


“Let It Be!”
It’s been a huge honor!


54 comments:

  1. A great post about a very versatile and talented Houston designer. This may be my favorite so far of all the Houston designers you have featured over the years. I love the serenity of her designs. BTW, I was never a subscriber to Domino Magazine, but isn't Katy's style more Elle Decor?

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    1. Oops, meant to type "Katie".

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  2. I remember the house when it was featured in Country French, loved it. Really enamored with Katie's work now that I have some background on her as a person, thank you for once again providing an indepth pertinent post. Can't wait to check out her jewelry, btw I adore my necklace from your lovely and talented daughter and always get a compliment when I wear it (today!). Cheers! Sarah

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    1. Wow! thank you! I'll tell her, she'll be thrilled.

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  3. I remember loving those pics of her earlier designs, still do. But I can't get pass the new home's gruesome past, I just couldn't live there. Her new designs, not my favorite, but it does shows her immense talent! Congratulations on winning a design award. Best, Laurie'

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    1. The New Orleans home was done for a client. It does not belong to Kati. I love the New Orleans vibe and energy she put into the home while retaining a sense of restraint and elegance.

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  4. Beautiful home, horrible views out the windows. Hello neighbors....

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    1. Excuuuuuuse me? That's New Orleans! The views out the windows are as wonderful as looking out an empty field. Please. come on.

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    2. Were you not identified as "anonymous", I would have assumed that you are Tara Dillard.

      It's the French Quarter for heaven's sake where the homes often sit on very small lots, close together and of varying size and design - it's not the wet lands of the bayou.

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    3. If you go to the Vamp's post on this house you can get a good feel for its location, I think the views are amazing, what a wonderful vibe! Thanks Joni and Katie!

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  5. I love this post! I never knew her name but I've loved images of her work featured in different places. Just hearing about her book made me well up...must be left over from my yoga class this morning! I'll probably order Let It Be and read it on my flight to Paris (if it is that kind of book) BUT WHAT I REALLY LOVE is that Mother Mary ring! I have tons of jewelry that I've inherited so I never buy it....til today. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that ring! What a beautiful 50th birthday gift for myself (I might let my hubby buy it for our 25th anniversary....hmmmnn) Thank you for turning me onto this beautiful soul!
    e

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    1. I do too!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! love it. I love it all actually, but I can't wear crosses. But - the Jewish stars, the Hamsas. The bangles. I love how she put her soul in the designs. Ben loved it too. i wish Elisabeth had a birthday coming up.

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  6. An excellent feature - thank you! I think I've gone to almost every link and read them in their entirety - and then some! Fascinating history, too. Again, thank you.

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  7. I've never seen it before but her own house is perfection. And is that a Cy Twombly painting?!

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    1. It certainly looks like a Cy Twombly, doesn't it? Gorgeous!

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  8. Joni, thank you so much for the generous post. I am so grateful! I am touched, once again, by your kind words and thoughts! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Much love and appreciation, Katie

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    1. Katie, you are incredibly talented. Thank you for sharing your talent with us through these beautiful pictures.

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    2. After reading about you and your book on Cote de Texas I ordered a copy and haven't been able to stop thinking about it since I read it. I would like to send you an email with some of my thoughts and a couple of questions but your website doesn't have a category for contacting you. I know you are incredibly busy and may not have time to read an email from a fan but if there is a way I can contact you directly please let me know. Thanks so much!

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  9. Oh my word…as always…a phenomenal post! I love anything to do with Houston at the moment! Can explain why later! For now…those people that don't know and appreciate New Orleans, I feel sorry for you! I really do! My daughter and her husband have lived there for the past 3 years…we go by this incredible home quite often! So glad to see these inside pictures! Thank you, Joni for always posting things that we truly need to know about and truly WANT to know about! Your blog is amazing! One day…I want to be just like you! You always shoot straight and yet you make it fun as well…and beautiful! Thank you!

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  10. Her work is very refreshing! Thank you to you and Katie for bringing delight to this day!

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  11. Love her work and love her jewelry but most of all, I love how she loves God in all ways and is proud of it!!

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    1. Not in the Torah nor the Old or New Testament, is it written where can you pray for or to the dead, nor "Holy Water" that magically fixes anything, but you can pray to the Living God, with whom all things are possible, including forgiveness and hope and redemption and help in time of need. xx oo

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    2. While I am not replying to agree or disagree with your comment, I hope this does not turn into a "religious slugfest" nor another round of slave day commentary about the wickedness of owning property from the antebellum era. Having read all of the links to this post, it seems quite evident that this designer has her heart in the right place.

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    3. I would say yes to that

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  12. This is all so beautiful Joni! Thanks for the link and for your blog!

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  13. Thank you for another great post, Joni.
    Wished that I could say that I love the house, but I don’t. I guess I am just craving some color.
    But the outside of her house is gorgeous..

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  14. What a gifted designer! The study in the New Orleans home was just jaw dropping. And the entry of the New Orleans home, I just loved the mixture of old with new! If someone were to ask me if I wanted python fabric on my dining chairs, I would have emphatically declined, but then I see what she's done with the dining room, and I'm rethinking, which, to me, is what makes a great designer. Thanks so much for sharing, Joni.

    Leigh

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    1. Not sure I could go with the fabric, but adored the dining table and chairs. The details of this home are really stunning and the fact that the restoration was so complete is nothing short of amazing.

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  15. HEAVENS!! Her design soul is wonderful!! Seriously...2008...how absolutely timeless!! This is how I would like to live...beautiful descriptions!! Thanks!! franki

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  16. I'm inspired to add more gilding to my house now!

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  17. Katie is uber talented and Joni I enjoyed these images more than any recent posts I can recall, she has an astounding design aesthertic!

    xoxo
    Karena
    The Arts by Karena

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  18. All this edited beauty...I want to clear most of my surfaces! Off to check out her website.

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  19. Joni: Loyal reader of your blog. Happy to see a little part of my work made it's debut here.

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    1. what? which is yours? do tell!!! are you an artisit, painter?

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    2. Great decorations style! I love it! I’m even more impressed with her jewelry works! Would love to get one of the cuff bracelets.

      Nice and Clean London

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    3. Mary Malik here. I designed 3 of the fireplaces along with the stone flooring when the house was built. Makes me proud each time the house has been published to see they have remained. I've seen the transformation from dark to light and beautiful both ways. Katie did a wonderful job with the lighter tones I prefer for this lovely lady and her 4 beautiful daughters. The bedrooms are something out of a storybook every girl should have. Well done Katie.

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    4. Thanks. I love that house. It's my favroite of all her work. Just love it.

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  20. When referring to a publication, shouldn't the name be capitalized, i.e. Domino Magazine rather than domino magazine?

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    1. domino isn't capitalized. it''s the way they spell it.

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  21. This is what exactly the luxury is. The rug on the master bedroom is all blue and white. Gives a pleasant feel. Oh my god! All the bedroom designs are unique and looking awesome. These designs in bright colors seem to fill me with energy and makes the home more luxurious

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  22. The story behind the Louisiana house is chilling and horrific - I had never heard of it before. I am sitting here in my bedroom on an Autumn Saturday morning and feel very creeped out and sorry for those slaves - at least their suffering has been acknowledged and remembered. I think it takes someone brave to take on a house with such history, never mind live in it. The main rooms of the house look beautiful, light and lovely during the day but at night time in that house I would be terrified.

    I loved looking at the photos of Katie's earlier work, I don't think I've ever seen three such beautiful bedrooms in one house.

    Through you I have become enamoured of Houston Style decorating but these past couple of weeks, and also through watching the TV series "True Detective" I have become really intrigued by Louisiana, a place I have never given much through to before. I also follow Valorie Hart's New Orleans Visual Vamp blog and bought her book, I think my interest in Louisianan decorating might have started there and now Cote de Texas is continuing the Louisiana decor master class for us lucky readers.

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    1. I loved the scenes in Maggie's house on True Detective after her divorce from Marty. Does anyone have information on the set designer? Thanks

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  23. Wonderful post! I've loved Katie's work ever since I saw it in Country French magazine. I didn't know about her jewelry! Beautiful designs! I do have a question and maybe some other longtime readers can help me out- I have 3 daughter's myself and would LOVE to decorate their rooms the way Katie has done- obviously the rooms were styled for a photoshoot- but how does one incorporate a beautiful room like these with the wishes and desires of 3 strong-willed girls?? My oldest has black and white and turquoise for her current color scheme and while her room is pretty, it doesn't go with the rest of my relaxed and lighter European look. Not to mention, all the things they like to have out- trophies, books, art projects, legos, american girl dolls, etc.

    What do some of you do? Do your children have strong opinions on their rooms? Do you have children's rooms "flow" with the rest of the house? I live north of Dallas and it seems like all the girl's rooms in our neighborhood come straight from potterybarn teen or Justice store. I'm so confused!! Maybe I just wait to redeorate them when they leave in 8-14 years! I'm reminded of this funny blog post :http://suburbanturmoil.com/warped-childhood-restoration-hardware-style/2012/12/03/

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    1. Kids have strong opinions about everything ... but fortunately, no money. In our house, whoever pays the bills has the final say. The earlier this is taught, the better. So no unfortunate colour choices permitted. All toys remain downstairs in the family room in cupboards/shelves (no clutter in the bedroom or family room). Other childhood artefacts (trophies, model airplanes) must be grouped together (i.e. not spread all over) to look neat, preferably where they won't be knocked and require rearranging (window ledge, on top of wardrobe). One or two groupings (maximum) per room to avoid clutter. One bulletin board if a child wants to display photos/certificates. I made my daughter's out of an antique picture frame. Posters or flags are only allowed inside closet doors. We move often so I can't save children's artwork, but I do save what will fit in and photograph the rest for a scrapbook (to be made someday). A chest of drawers as night table contains bedside clutter (books, lip balm). My children's bedrooms therefore look half grownup (neat, minimized clutter, non-garish tones of pinks, blues) and half childish (1-2 groupings of artefacts plus bulletin board). It's the best compromise for all of us.

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    2. As a mother of two, that is possibly the saddest paragraph I have ever read. How old are your children? I would guess younger. You may need to lighten up a bit as they grow older.

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    3. And most importantly: "No wire hangers!!!'

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    4. My children are 14 (boy) and 10 (girl). I'm not sure why you found it to be the "saddest paragraph". If my son were to read this thread, he'd probably shrug his shoulders and say: "first world problems". My kids actually have nice rooms. My son outgrew his dinosaur sheets years ago, and now has a travel theme going on (globes, model ships, coral). When I asked him whether he wanted me to get rid of anything (as we're preparing to relocate again for my husband's job), he said "no, keep the room the way it is". My daughter has a pink Shabby Chic (Target) style room with a display of dolls-from-different-countries my husband brought home from trips. She'd like to change her bedding to purple -- which I will do because she wishes it AND because she's had her two sets of pink sheets for several years. Emphasis on the second point. I do not see why a child is "entitled" to a decor of his/her whim. I have the means to transform the kids' rooms into anything they'd like, as often as they'd like, but why would I want to? I will bring home purple sheets, in a shade I can live with, and my daughter will be delighted. I learned a long time ago NOT to ask children (this works with anything) "What do you want?", but rather to suggest "You can have a or b -- which one do you choose?"

      As for the rest of my counsel, I was responding to darlacz's question regarding reconciling children's and parents' room preferences. What is "sad" about trying to make the kids' bedrooms peaceful havens? I am lucky to have a family room where I can relegate toys. What is "sad" about trying to teach kids good organization principles (grouping rather than scattering, having a place for everything and everything in its place, clutter reduction as a goal)? They're still messy (still kids), but their rooms are never a complete disaster. What is "sad" about buying good quality furniture (not antiques, but excellent adult size mattresses and reading chairs) that pass the test of time and teach children about value for money? Does a child really need a bed shaped like a car, to be changed out a few years later for some other fad? What is "sad" about posters inside closet doors? You can open the doors and see them any time you want, but you can also close them for a more restful setting. My children's rooms reflect their interests, but still fit the rest of the house and what I believe a bedroom should be (restful). I think it's a mistake to assume that a child will not be "happy" if s/he doesn't get the car-shaped bed or a Paris-themed room. It's alright to say no. I have every confidence that our "first world" children will have lots of happy memories regardless of their bedroom decor.

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  24. I am a designer. I strongly believe that a house should flow from room to room, but I encourage everyone to let their children have their own space. I let my own have the purple "zoo" room... the orange and gold "Paris" room ect. Now they are both grown women with homes of their own and they do a great job with their decorating. Children are only with you a few years, let their time at home be a happy place that brings smiles to their face when they think back. You will get those rooms back sooner than you think.

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  25. I hope you don't mind, but I gave your blog a mention and link today.

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  27. That New Orleans house is jaw dropping GORGEOUS!!! But what a horrific past! I don't know that I could get beyond that... sure is fun to look at the beautiful pictures though! Thank you for introducing me to Katie's work! She is incredibly talented!

    XOXO,
    The Glam Pad

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