09 May 2012

Dear Miss Cote de Texas

 

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Today’s letter comes from Stacy who writes:

I am a mother of a daughter who has just turned 11. I am an avid reader of your blog and love the design of the bedroom you and your daughter did at your house. I have scoured the web for months looking for other tasteful teen bedrooms for tween/teen girls. I am sure you are aware of how tacky girl decor can get...zebra print with Pepto-Bismol pink walls...I really don't like PB Teen either...unless you live at the beach. I love my daughter's room now. The walls are just a "breath" of pink with toile roman shades. My daughter is tired of her "baby" room. Could you please do a post on this? I know if anyone can relate to what daughters want vs. what mothers want you can. I know I have to let Audrey (my daughter) have a say so....but the inspirational photos out there are heinous!

Yours truly,

Stacy

 

Dear Stacy,

I’m not sure how long you have read the blog, but believe me, over the years Elisabeth and I have been through many phases of her “decorating” and not all of it is pretty.  When she was a young teenager, she discovered West  Elm and wanted her room decorated with all of it.  I let her pick it all out herself, including the purple ceiling and assortment of lilac silk and velvet fabrics.  If I recall correctly, I think she even ordered it herself over the internet.  My mother thought it looked like a bordello.   But, Elisabeth is very strong willed and there’s not much compromising.   She wanted a Bordello, and that’s what she got. 

 

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The West Elm lilac Bordello room lasted a few years.

 

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Before graduation, I was thrilled when she wanted a new décor and told me to just do whatever I wanted – she trusted me.  Boy, things had changed!  I bought the Anthropologie headboard that I had always loved, a Wisteria chaise, white linens, a cheap chandelier,  a French desk, an Aidan Gray lamp, Tara Shaw mirror and sconces.  I bought a few antiques, like the dress form, the table, and a small mirror.  Today, PBTeen sells a similar headboard that is MUCH cheaper! 

 

 

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The angel santos from Olivine is my favorite thing in her room.  The curtains are a blue and white check.  The chair came from Eloquence and the Fortuny and velvet pillows came from BViz.  The bedding came from Olivine.

 

 

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I need to retake this picture – at the time she had piles of junk under her desk!  The sconces were old – but I had new amethysts crystals added to them.    Elisabeth loves her room – and I thought that maybe some of my style had rubbed off on her, but I was wrong!

 

 

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Her dorm room at college which she decorated all herself – she picked out the brown and white bedding from Serena and Lily, the Pepto-Bismol (as you call it) pink furniture from Target, and the brown sofa.  I did pick out the rug and the desk chair.  When we decorated her first apartment the next year, she let me have a big input in it:

 

 

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For her first apartment, Elisabeth let me help her – we bought the sofa, chaise, chair and ottoman from Ikea that comes with the white slipcovers.  The mirror came from Wisteria? Or was it Ballards?  I can’t remember which!  The brown linen pillows came from Restoration Hardware.  This apartment was a collaboration between the two of us – she spent all summer studying online furniture stores, but in the end, she bought what I suggested.  Over the past year, she has added things like a French chair she got at Home Source, an area rug, and brighter navy and white pillows. 

 

So, Stacy – you can see from my own experience,  daughters (and sons, I suppose) go through stages of letting you design their private space and stages of not wanting your help at all!   While Elisabeth’s first teen bedroom was her own choices, she gave me back the control when she was older.  Her first dorm room was all Elisabeth, but then, she gave me back some control with her first apartment.  Since your daughter is still not quite a teenager, she may be willing to let you decorate her room, with a just a little input from her. 

 

It sounds like you are wanting something more sophisticated for her – not Pottery Barn with its loud colors and beachy-themes.   It also sounds like you have seen everything there is to see on the internet and Pinterest, so I’m not going to show you much from the Web.  Instead, I am going to show you some teen rooms and guest rooms that I have collected over the years that I personally like.  If you like any of the bedrooms, I would suggest you print out the ones you do like, and ask your daughter to choose her favorite from that small selection.  This way, you are in control of what she can pick – but she will still feel like she is making the decision.  Sneaky, I know, but by not showing her Pepto-Bismol pink, she won’t ask for it!!!

 

I found this teenager’s bedroom on the blog Classic Casual Home.   It’s sophisticated, but still youthful, with lots of color – but not too bright. 

 

And her sister’s room – is done in different colors. I like the textiles that are at the end of the beds in both rooms.

 

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Classic Casual Home does E Designs for clients.  This tween bedroom is quiet, but sophisticated.  I love the colors used in the room and the velvet mixed with cottons.

 

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A bigger view – with a cute chandelier hanging in the corner.

 

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I designed this bedroom for a teenager – we used an inexpensive patterned carpet and nightstands from Tar-get’!  We ordered the headboard from Pottery Barn, but covered it in our own fabric.   The chair was hers, recovered and a velvet covered French bench from Shabby Chic goes at the base of the bed.  The fabric was inexpensive allowed us to use a lot of it.  We mixed in some velvet for a touch of luxury.  The sconces add some charm, as does a crystal chandelier – out of view.

 

 

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The mirrored furniture from Z Gallerie is a great buy and perfect for teenaged girls.

 

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Finally, I made a HUGE bulletin board for the wall between two doors.  At the time, I thought she would never get it filled up – but she did, and more.  She is leaving for college this year.  The biggest problem with tweens room is the “junk.”  Baskets help keep it to a minimum, and a bulletin board like this is a huge asset.  I always try to add one when doing a teen’s bedroom.

 

 

Some of my all time favorite teenage rooms are by Pamela Piece.  This classic bedroom could go from teen to adult guest room.  It’s just gorgeous.  Lilac walls and peach blinds.  The duvet that flows to the floor is a great touch.   The chandelier is gorgeous too!  Using a duvet like this mixed with a taffeta dust ruffle in a different, soft color could be all you would need – no canopy would be necessary.

 

 

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Another room by Pierce is a favorite.  Think about using silk taffeta curtains – just like this! There is nothing more feminine.  Simple white linens and a slipcovered bed.  The room is simple, but gorgeous and the curtains are to die for.

 

 

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More Pierce – I know – I just love her taste!  Stripes on the walls either painted or wallpapered are something to consider.  As is velvet.  Velvet and silk are two fabrics I would use in a girls room.  They are just so feminine!

 

 

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Last Pierce bedroom – love the tufted velvet headboard – it’s so pretty.  And notice the full dust ruffle Pierce does – ask for a “triple” ruffle for extra fullness.    Think of putting down seagrass for sophistication, and layer a rug over it for texture. 

 

 

 

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This cute bedroom is divided into a playroom and sleeping area.  Love the lilac stripped blinds and chair. 

 

 

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Think about using an antique or reproduction day bed.

This bedroom designed by Jane Moore is a mix of new and old.  Love the scalloped bedspread.

 

 

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On the other side of the room, a Swedish sofa.  You could always find a new reproduction of this look.  But I love how this Swedish sofa is so much more attractive than what is expected.

 

 

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Sally Wheat used a velvet tufted ottoman as a focal point – and mixed in an antique mirror to give this teen bedroom a touch of sophistication.

 

 

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Jane Wood used linens in peach and linen to create a serene bedroom.  Cute iron beds are so feminine.  I love the mini ruffled trim.   

 

 

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Gingham or check fabrics is so cute in a girl’s bedroom.  Think about using an antique end table – something that could grow with your daughter until you use the room as a guest room. Ginger Barber.

 

 

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Michelle Stewart designed this tween’s room using scallops and checks and toile.  So pretty in lilacs.

 

The above bedroom always reminded me of this bedroom, which is still one of the prettiest ever.  Checks and toile in a soft lilac with taffeta curtains.   Love the touch of green on the stools.  Nothing is prettier.

 

 

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A room like this could go from teen to guest room.  Think cornices to dress down the curtains.  Plain fabrics keep it ageless.

 

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In this teen room, greens and blues and browns are mixed in a playful combination. 

 

 

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Indulge Décor designs these wonderfully shaped headboards.  Here a mix of pink and white – notice the wall is half painted – a great idea!  Mirrored furniture is used with an antique trumeau.

 

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Think of a graphic wallpaper mixed with a mirrored and tufted headboard.  Once your daughter leaves for college, you could replace the paper with something more sedate.  Design and bed from The Amy Howard Collection. 

 

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Don’t discount Shabby Chic.  They make the most wonderfully feminine bedding. 

 

Simply Shabby Chic® Lilac Ruffle Comforter Set $65.00 - $97.00 available at #Target

If the main line is too expensive, Target sells Rachel’s discounted line, like this.

 

 

And I love the tutu paintings Shabby Chic sells – a painting your daughter could take home to her own daughter’s nursery one day.

 

 

 

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Angie Gren used one of the tutu paintings in her daughter’s bedroom. 

 

 

 

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Don’t totally discount PBTeen, I love this bed they sell.  It is a timeless and ageless piece at a great price.

 

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And certainly, I would not forget about Restoration Hardware Baby and Children’s line.  It’s gorgeous.  All of it.

 

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This slipped bed reminds me of the one in Pam Pierce’s room with the taffeta curtains. 

 

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You could show your daughter any of RH’s rooms to let her choose from.  They are all wonderful!

 

Good luck Stacy, I hope I’ve given you some ideas to show your daughter.  Send us a picture when you’ve finished with her new room!

104 comments:

  1. Great bedrooms Joni... I have recently finished a flat for my daughter... it's gorgeous.. It was a true collaboration between the two of us... The only problem is that I wnat a new bedroom now! Forget the daughters... I need a change... there are just so many wonderful choices... xv

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  2. joni

    you, as always...
    have outdone yourself finding images.
    i love them.
    the teen rooms are wonderful.

    how about the 'chanel' lamp in your daughters room?
    was it a counter display lamp?

    extremely cool.

    xx

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    1. She bought that at a retail store in houston - isn't it adorable. but she and her BoyFriend decided it didn't "go" with her apartment - so they sold it on ebay!!! oh well.

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    2. "Chanel Lamps?" Real Chanel goes anywhere, any time. I am assuming you mean the metal double C styled lamps. If they are original, who in their right mind would sell them. If knock offs, save them for another decor. They are a great look.

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  3. Your daughter's "bordello" made me laugh out loud. My own 15 year old recently wanted a boho look replete with colored X-mas lights. Unlike you, I told her to forget it. I also have a three yr. old and have purchased the Ashwell Shabby Chic bedding from Target and combined it with some custom pillows on her matching antique twin beds. The Target bedding is a bit crunchy, even after multiple washings, but boy is it cute!

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  4. Sorry, Joni but the lovely bedrooms you showed us will seldom make a teen happy. The bedroom should be her spot not some idea of how an adult thinks it should look. As much as I dislike the bordello look, I bet it made your daughter happy. You pick the big things, like furniture and then give her a budget and let her pick room color, spread, pillows, and the like. Make her happy.

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    1. I have a quick personal comment on that. As a tween/teen, I had a lot of opinions about what I liked, but my taste was also constantly changing. My mom always let me help with choices and give input. Looking back, I see that when she let me pick things/colors by myself, I quickly grew tired of them. But the designs and items we worked on together would usually please me longer. Between 10 and 12, for example, young girls go through a lot of changes - opinion, maturity, interests. Unless you plan to completely redecorate every year, girls/boys are going to need some guidance to help pick some basics they will still like 2 years later. I will say though, my mom never did try to convince me to go as adult/mature as the sample rooms Joni provided.

      I guess if you can afford to redecorate often, then sure...let your tween/teen make all the choices.

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  5. Now I wish I had a daughter so I could give her one of these amazing bedrooms. Joni you always seem to come through for people with the best looking rooms....bravo!

    XX
    Debra~

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  6. All these rooms are lovely. I think most young girls would love any one of them. I have sons. They are grown now, but I still remember one son's choice of black walls and posters of rock stars. He loved it, but when he moved out, painting over black was not fun. I would happily relive that time of life over again if I could, though.
    Best...Victoria

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  7. Forget the kids; I'd love to have any of those rooms! Thanks, Joni, for all the wonderful ideas. Beth

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  8. I am BEGGING you Joni... please do the same post for a 16 year old young man!!! please please please... i am at such a loss...Pam

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    1. look at Sally Wheat's house, I love her son's room! it's dark with a dark and white striped ceiing. You could copy it with twin beds instead of bunks.

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  9. I think I have never grown up... I want one of these rooms !!! Once a princess always a princess!

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  10. Your daughter's room, now, is a perfect design for a wall of my Conservatory. PERFECT.

    Thank you!

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

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  11. I'm going to be redecorating my oldest(12)daughter's room soon for the third time and she wants that zebra and pink look! I HATE it! If I'm going to be buying all new decor for her room, I'm not buying a bunch of cheap looking things that I can't stand. When SHE can buy it, then she can buy all the ugly decor she wants.

    Thank you for showing some lovely rooms that can stand the test of time. I just know that the zebra and pink look will be unwanted after less than 2 years with my girl at least, I want something that can last through all the teen years and most of these rooms would do that. Maybe a surprise makeover would go over well? With her favorite colors in mind of course.

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    1. Paint can be a wonderful compromiser! The Stencil Library has some wonderful animal print stencils available for sale here: http://www.stencil-library.com/docs/cat270.htm You could let her do an accent wall in zebra (even let her paint the stencil pattern herself) or maybe just zebra patterned drawer fronts on a thrift store night table. Paint is cheap, and easy to RE-paint. Same thing with (ugh!) hot pink walls. Also, a little goes a long way with these bold patterns and hues, so the big purchases in the room can be more neutral/tasteful, with much more longevity. Good luck!

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    2. you could do a white room - the add the pink and zebra in pillows and throws - in ayear or to, you could give those away and be left with a beautiful room underneath!

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  12. Lovely post. I did follow your posts for a few years. I urged my daughter and her college roommate at Baylor to purchase the black adn white damask bedding from Target last year- kind of like your daughters brown and white. You have to have some bold colors and pattern to dress up the drab rooms. It was adorable! And inexpensive! That is a plus. The room at the house is still her teen room, but I let her pick out what she wanted, like you did. If they don't have a say so, they will be miserable andhold it against you for years. My son, 16, is redoing he room and I have brought several choices of bedding home to him that I liked and he finally settled on a blue and white stipe from Ralph Lauren. Now that his room looks more grownup his 19 year old sister wants a grown up looking room too! Moms can eventually get their way, they just have to be patient. Great job! BYW, how is Elizabeth doing? I enjoyed reading her blog too when you linked to it. Very grown up girl with nice taste!

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    1. she is writing her blog again, sort of - it's on the link called Him and Her - something like that. she's doing great, just came home today for the summer with lulu. oy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! there go the curtains!

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  13. I think we all agree that black and white zebra print with pepto-pink needs to be banished. Can you imagine waking up to that every morning. Your choices, as always, are tranquil - timeless - elegant. I love the soft colours.
    And I agree with the earlier comment - masculine room styles for young men would be great to see.

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  14. Joni so many beautiful examples and several of the rooms decor I would LOVE to have!

    You idea of choosing several and then letting the teen pick out of that group is perfect!!

    I have a feature Interview on my site with Tina from The Enchanted Home...

    PS if Olivine has a Santos anything similar to yours I would get it for my Mother!

    xoxo
    Karena

    Art by Karena

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  15. Joni, Thank you for all that you do!

    Please, please, will you share your source and brand for the "inexpensive" patterned carpet used in the teenager's beautiful, blue room that you created? I would have guessed that it is Stark, but that is out of my budget!

    I have two daughters and I'm working on both of their rooms. My sticking point right now is carpet/area rugs . . . we have hardwood floors, and I want to add area rugs for softness but I just can NOT find something beautiful that I love. I'm close to giving up and just putting in wall-to-wall, neutral carpet.

    For my youngest daughter I bought a gorgeous antique bed and had it professionally painted a creamy white - - a very affordable way to get a special bed!
    Thank you, thank you for researching this topic - - I loved every image!

    Jennifer

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    1. Let's see. hmmm. I swear = ok I'm 57 and my memory is not what it used to be! hahah! but I want to say - Home depot? Let me ask her mom. I just don't remember exactly.

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    2. Thank you so much for the reply! Wow - I didn't expect you to say Home Depot . . . I will check that out. And if you find out differently from her mom, I'd love to know!

      Jennifer

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  16. Once again, WOW Joni! I'm fixing to redo a guest room ~ my son married and I want it to move from his room to "their" room. You gave me a couple of great ideas for that change. Thanks for your indepth pictures.

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  17. You are definitely the Answer Lady! Such great research! Debbie's daughter's room that you showed reflect their color choices and tastes. My e-client's daughter had selected the IKEA duvet and she had input....I think that is the main thing...making the space theirs but with direction so that it can be pulled together....like you have done.

    If I let my son decorate his room it would be covered in Kobe Bryant and rap posters... but now it's a reflection of his travels and some sports and he loves to show it off to his friends (and the little flat screened tv in there was the icing on the cake).

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  18. Charlotte Des FlerusMay 9, 2012 at 9:58 AM

    An absolutely gorgeous selection of rooms! However, nearly all those rooms will require a teen who is neat, or if not neat, a regular cleaning service, maybe every day! Best suggestion for anyone with children is to let them make the final decision but edit selections down to what YOU can live with. This is essential if YOU are paying for it. We had 3 boys and 2 girls. That is exactly how we approached everything from clothing, to hairstyles to decorating rooms. Now, if THEY earned the money to pay for something, THEY got to choose it. It is surprising how that tempered their choices!

    I did my first room when I was 12. Actually, with NO imput from my parents. My bedroom faced southeast but was shaded by a neighbors house. Therefore, my room only received a sliver of light in the morning in the summer. I chose yellow to warm things up. Except for the mattress, bedframe and chest of drawers, I bought and paid for everything else. I had a business raising parakeets which gave me about $30 per month in income. (Equal to about $300 per month today.)

    We did not have Target, Pier One, World Market, IKEA, Restoration Hardward, Craigslist or any of the on-line resources available today. Consequently, everything came from local thrift shops, Goodwill, the Army surplus store and Woolworth's. I made my own chadelier from electronic parts from the Army Surplus store, Erector Set parts and plastic Christmas crystals at our local hardware store. Covered the fake white "candle" tubes with beeswax to make them look more real.

    I remember agonizing for weeks over a $5 wicker chair that was the wrong color. Finally bought it, then had to spend another $3 for 3 cans of spray paint.

    My room was small but functional and pretty. I had a chair for reading and putting on shoes (an essential, I think, even in the smallest room.) Believe it or not, my matchstick blinds were mounted even with the top of the curtain rod AND I sewed and LINED my own curtains. Our floors were hardwood. I added a rug, not seagrass, but some sort of woven grasslike material from the Army Surplus store. (What was the Army doing with that?) I bought a small storage chest for the end of my bed. It was cleaned and painted inside and out. Then I padded and upholstered the top with fabric to match my curtains and duvet.

    I could not afford to buy design magazines or books but our local library (a 30-minute bicycle ride) had quite a few. When my parents bought a beautiful new house 4 years later, I was the one to do the decor. For that house my mother wanted a real chandelier. We drove to the Design District on the edge of Beverly Hills to buy a VERY expensive, beautiful chandy loaded with crystals. She loved the look but did not want to have to clean it. However, I insisted that was the correct chandelier for their home. So, to this day, I drive up to their home and clean the chandelier on a regular basis. A few years later I bought 2 mini chandeliers, also dripping with crystals, for their soft pink and gold powderroom.

    My point of all this is whoever pays gets to make the choices. Second, teach your children about personal rsponsibility. I promised to clean my mother's chandeliers and have kept that promise for over 40 years. My youngest son had a very nicely decorated college apartment which he did almost enitrely by himself - leather couch and oriental rugs - very masculine. However, it was so well done that most of his friends feared he might be Gay! Well, tell THAT to his wife and daughter. He is a perfect husband - makes plenty of money for decorating AND is willing to go shopping for furniture and clothing.

    "Raise up a child in the way he should go and he when he is old he will not depart from it." Solomon

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    1. Charlotte - what a charming story!!! I can imagine that you have loved design from birth! Really a cute story - worrying about that chair!
      thanks for sharing.
      J

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    2. Charlotte Des FleursMay 9, 2012 at 11:44 PM

      To Joni - from birth? You are probably right. When I travel I bring my own hand embroidered, linen pillow cases and have even been known to re-arrange my hotel rooms.

      When I stay in a hotel for 2 days or more, I buy a small bunch of flowers for my room - something with a nice scent like lilacs, carnations or freesias. It helps to take the edge off business trips. Is this compulsive or what!

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  19. These rooms are all gorgeous, but where's all the teenage STUFF?

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    1. Agreed. We don't have a separate playroom for our kids (9 and 6), and they do have a lot of toys. Each child has a Pottery Barn Kids 3 shelf Cameron bookcase for books in each room. My daughter also has two single door and one double door cabinet in her room. They were from Crate and Barrel (the Windham style http://reviews.crateandbarrel.com/7258/22298/windham-high-two-door-cabinet-reviews/reviews.htm?sort=reviewTextLength). I just sew "matching" fabric squares to velcro into the glass window. She can stuff all her toys in there and I don't have to look at them. It also gives her some display space on top. My son has a set of 4 tall shelves (from Bombay when they were closing). Each shelf has a combo of toys and fabric bins.

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  20. I have a question. What color is the paint on the walls in this room? It's beautiful!
    http://media-cache6.pinterest.com/upload/125115695868166770_M36Ozdub_f.jpg

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    1. it's a sherwin williams colors - it's on the actual blog story - the last one, just hit previous story from this one.

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  21. I believe that anyone's private space should reflect THEIR personality, not that of the parent. You may have a budding artist in there! In any case, allowing a child to pick out a large part of their decor will be something they remember forever. Treat the child as you would a client; don't force your views on them, but lead them gently. It's fine to set up ground rules (you pick out the furniture, for instance) but give them power! After all, these are the years they are trying things on for size; learning their own tastes and making mistakes. The mistakes are where they will learn best.
    You only have a child for a short period of time. Creating memories together that both of you can reminisce & laugh over years later is a wonderful thing. You can choose to make your child happy or you can be a control freak. There are so many more important things to worry about than what color a child wants for her room. If she wants pink and zebra now, give her a budget and let her have it. If she tires of it in a year, then she has to earn the $$ to change it. Big deal. And you can always close the door!

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  22. What works the best for me (with both a 9 year old girl and a 6 year old boy) is to find something we both like. It's a fairly quick process to rule out the things I like but they don't and the things they like but I don't. We've always managed to find things we BOTH like. I hope it's a good process for them to learn too for future compromises with teachers, roommates, friends, bosses, coworkers or spouses. It's not that hard to find a common ground when both parties are open and nonjudgmental to other's ideas.

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    1. And, I forgot to add that I learn soooo much about my kids when I am listening to why they like or don't like things.

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    2. Cyndia MontgomeryMay 9, 2012 at 12:25 PM

      Great idea!

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  23. My daughters have always shared a bedroom. We tried to balance their styles, but the room really favored my oldest daughter. So when my youngest daughter turned 8 this year, I told her it was time to get her own bedroom. "You need a space where you can express yourself," I told her. "I want to paint it black," she replied. I used a matte black on the walls with cream trim. I did steer her away from the pepto-bismal in favor of peachy-pink accents, and it actually looks amazing.

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    1. ok, i always wanted a twin - and i just pretend i had one and would design a bedroom for us - with a curtain down the middle and each side would be different. i had seen something like that in a magazine when i was probably around 8 and it just stuck with me for years.

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  24. Joni,

    I love all of the bedrooms. Makes me wish I had at least 1 daughter...with 2 sons it was pretty easy for mom to have her way with furniture. Like you, I made sure they had some input, art, accessories, and a large bulletin board! Great post. I would love to see your take on bedrooms for teenage sons.

    Karen

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  25. OMG Joni! The suggestions in this post are so fabulous that they could be considered for an adult woman, especially an almost 52 year old divorced gal like myself, with the exception of the dolls and stuffed animals, lol! So that means they can grow well past a teenagers later years, but I doubt if her mom would want her to live at home forever. Mom can use the room as a beautiful guest room in the future. I am quite sure she respects your great taste even more now. I most certainly do!

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  26. Gotta say, I loved the original "Bordello" Room.

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    1. aha. thanks. i should show the other side. it had cute shelves that matched the bed. it was cute for a while - until my mom called it a bordello.

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  27. I think the rooms are gorgeous, however, they feel too grown up and sophisticated for a young girl.
    Let her have pink with zebra, if that what makes her happy. When I was growing up my parents decorated my room with no input from me and it never felt like my special place.

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  28. Beautiful suggestions, Joni! As a teen I painted the word "LOVE" in neon paint to cover an entire wall in my bedroom. LOL.

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  29. Thanks a lot for the room ideas. Cool!

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  31. Wonderful ideas to show your points :)
    Kwik-Snow is a fun and exciting product that makes artificial snow in seconds. Kwik-Snow will provide hours, days and even weeks of fun for both kids and adults. Now you can have instant snow anywhere on demand even where it never snows, Kwik-Snowc an make artificial or fake snow decoration even in the middle of the desert. Imagine being the envy of all your neighbours.

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  32. My daughter is almost 11 and we just finished redecorating her room for the second time in two years. I “convinced” her to use very light pink walls, toile curtains and bedding, beautiful white French furniture from posh tots…it was stunning! Then her friends came over. You would not believe the guff she went through with all her soccer buddies. A note about the rooms above; they are beautiful but definitely not practical. Girls need a lot of storage especially if they do sports. When I did her room the first time her dresser barely held her school clothes. This time I really had to think about the practicality of the room rather than what was just pretty. Originally she wanted hot pink and black with a splash of Zebra. I would not go for that and again “convinced” her to go my way. She stopped having her friends over because she was so embarrassed with her room. Now whose room is it? Mine or hers? Needless to say we sold everything and just redid it the way SHE loves it. She is so happy with it. Her friends love it. Life is good. We have to remember they have to LOVE their room. Honestly I like it too.

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  33. LOVE LOVE all the room ideas! I have an eight year-old daughter and we will be moving again soon and this was sooo helpful with many ideas for her "big girl" room without being hot pink as she has requested.

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  34. I don't see a problem with sophisticated basics like furniture and drapes, and let the teen choose the throws, pillow, bulletin board, etc. even if they choose pink and zebra. That way it will be easy to change and upgrade as her tastes change. I do want to remind you of how often one of your guests on the Skirted Round Table reminisce about how they got interested in design and describes decorating their childhood room. Often it was hideous, but their mothers let them do it. I know it is one of my fondest memories when my mom took me to Moran's Drapes the summer I went to junior high, and let me choose a new bedspread, pillows, and curtains. Oh, lord! That was 50 years ago.

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  35. Great question by the reader and great ideas offered here. The difficult thing about designing rooms for children is that quality pieces of young adult furniture are hard to find. I would suggest buying the basic pieces such as the bed, chest, etc., in a mutually agreeable style and color that your daughter can grow into. This furniture will look entirely different with fun fabrics that give the room a youthful panache and later as the late teens approach the furniture will still be stylish with more sophisticated fabrics. Changing accessories and artwork will also be an easy way to transition from childhood to young adult. Hope you send in your pictures when the project is complete.

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  36. When I was 11, my mom and I did my room together. I wanted a pink shabby chic room (the trend look of the moment) while my mother wanted me to have a plainer, country farmhouse look with colonial furniture. We spent about a year working on the room together, and eleven years later it's still gorgeous. My mother insisted on using antiques in my room, and definitely steered me towards simpler furniture styles, but the overall feel of the room was definitely suited to my prefferences for feminine and french rather than her preferences for federal and colonial period rooms. Because of her guidance, the bones of the finished room were restrained enough to easily edit as I grew up. I also learned a ton about antiques and history while we were searching for my furniture, which helped me apreciate my mother's taste. On the other hand, one of the girliest elements, a RL pink rose wallpaper, which I loved but my mother wasn't sure about, is now her absolute favorite part of the room. I do think that it's important for a teen to have a place which reflects him/herself, but with a lot of talking and shopping, you can make a room that suits you AND your daughter better than the catolog options!

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  37. HI Joni!
    I think you gave a great variety of options here for younger womens bedrooms...... I must confess I love Pam Pierce's young but if you put itin a master bedroom would work too...... I think what you did with your daughter's room was great, I liked it the first time you posted it.........Merci Miss Cote de Texas Maryanne xo

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  38. I have always really loved decorating. I remember at about 12 or 13 being allowed to pick pink (not pepto, but very PINK) carpet for my bedroom (the house I grew up in was 500 years old and had wood floors) and I painted the base boards (myself) a matching glossy pink, and I painted a dresser and a "wardrobe" or armoire (an antique walnut one) the exact same shiny pink! No primer, nothing, I think I did sand the furniture first though. Keep in mind that these antiques were not fancy and two a penny in England . .but stil, when I think back that wardrobe was charming with an arched top and little diamond shaped aged brass lock in the door with an old fashioned key, and the wood had a lovley grain I do shock myself a bit! At the time what I really wanted would have been brand new furniture, probably laminate! Everything in my room was pink when I was done, save a bit of soft green and white. It was all done on a tight, tight budget. The wall to wall fitted carpet would have been the biggest splurge, but I am sure my parents must have felt the old threadbare rug needed replacing.

    My parents pretty much let me decide what I wanted to do with my rooms, then, and when I was younger and older (my only constraints were budget) and I think it might have been one of the better things they ever did for me. I can see now that being allowed to paint baseboards and furniture crazy colors made me feel creatively free and I turned into a person not aftaid to paint kitchen and bathroom cabinets (cream, not pink) later in life. I do believe I was just born creative with a need to personalize my space, but it certainly could have been squashed somehat as a teen, and it wasn't.

    I have a teen daughter myself now who wants to make some changes. I am being sneaky with her (or so I think). Just as I told her older brother who at one time wanted black walls (do all boys?) that if being unique and very personal is one of your decorating goals, just make sure it IS unique. I asked my son how many of his freinds wanted a black room? Turned out quite a few, at one point or another. I told him that every teen boy in history who has wanted to show their independence and creativity in their bedroom at some time has considered black. Then I left him to mull it over. He decided against black . .chose a very dark navy blue instead! Ha!

    I do the same thing with my daughter, if she wanted leopard print and hot pink I would point out just HOW EVERYWHERE IT IS, all over the net. While most teens want to fit in they always want to be unique. Of course, you may end up with leopard and mint green instead . .but is that the end of the world? Just letting a teen have a lot of creativity and say in their room is so important. Honestly, painting that furniture (I think I was shocked I was allowed to do it, and I didn't even have to beg) is one of the best memories I have of being a teen! Oh the creative freedom I felt, and how I loved the color I chose all by myself. That room was my little world. I admit, I do try and have bit more sneaky input with my teens than my parents did with me (because I honestly don't think my parents really cared much about decorating AT ALL and had no strong opinions about such things . .I don't know where I came from) themselves . .and I always did, but in the end I do think it is best to let teens have a lot of input, at the very least.

    Louise

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    1. I am loving all these stories!!! I got to help decorating my room when we built a new house - I had a lilac sink! can you believe? and a crystal chandelier with white "french" dressers and lilac walls. i think we all had a say so in decorating our rooms - that's why we are still interested in design. love hearing your stories!

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  39. What a revelation! I am the one that decorates my granddaughter's bedroom. Last time-three years ago, she had me buy a sort of strawberry lavender for three walls and a dark eggplant for a focal wall. I was "zebra" printed to death-beddong and throw pillows-UGH! She loved it! I told her-last time this room would look like this-next time-more sophistication.

    Teenagers-what's up with the zebra and animal prints stuff? Thanks for sharing-Blessings.

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  40. I love the Pam Pierce room with the striped walls and the room with the purple plaid. I would take either of those. My girls (aged five and six) share a room and we've gone with pink walls (pink ground by farrow and ball - I said I'd never do it but my youngest really wanted it badly and she always gets the shaft), then block print bedding, some huge Basquiat posters which I framed (black), simple pottery barn day beds, tolomeo lamps attached to the wall. So, it's slightly girl but not disney land girl. The love the art, though I chose it and I often hear them talking about what's in the pictures. I can't afford and nor do I intend to redecorate their room often (too wasteful) so I chose things which I knew would pass the test of time and which would be interesting and look great. I'm happy with the result.

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    1. Basquiat???? wow. i would love to see pictures of this room , it sound fabulous!

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  41. Once again, you have outdone yourself! How do you do it? I read other blogs, but this is #1.
    After my husband and I split up, my ex told my son he'd buy him a water bed. Not at my house, I said. It's tacky! He asked me later, after he'd obviously been thinking about that,"Mom, who decides what's tacky, what's in good taste?" My answer, "Honey, in your case, your mother does!" Was I wrong? Maybe I was. I don't know but I couldn't stand it. I had a fairly small apartment and just didn't think it was the thing to do. That son, now 40, has learned more about good taste and doesn't hold it against me, for which I'm grateful.

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  42. Loved every room - now can you do a post on tween boys?

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  43. Joni, who knew this post would elicit "true confessions" from guilty parents. This is really funny. Haven't we all suffered a bit of guilt because we did not always acquiesce to a child's wishes. That's part of being a parent. I am still having pangs of guilt because I did not want a dog in our house. I don't dislike dogs, but I knew eventually the dog would become my responsibility and with three children, I did not seek to have a pet that demanded constant attention while the children were growing up, going to college and only seeing this pet as a toy when they came home. Trust me. I see Joni's beautiful dogs and say to myself "how could you not love one of these"? After the post on the curtains that were rendered unmentionable by dog poop, etc. I realized that I had exhibited some "touch love" . . . . maybe????

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    1. this is funny. my sister had no pets and one of her sons doesn't like dogs. he had a blind date with a girl and she said - i dont' like dogs and he looked at her ....and they are now married. i swear over their dislike of 'dirty" dogs.

      her other son married and his wife insisted on a dog = that's riley, the one we babysit and jeffrey loves that dog so much. it's so funny how one loves dogs and the other didn't. ???

      oh well, they can be a mess, but they give so much more than they take.

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  44. I just have to say that I think the comments to this post are every bit as wonderful as the post itself! I love all the personal stories . . .

    Jennifer

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  45. Hi Joni! Thank you so much for the beautiful bedroom pics! Audrey and I sat down and read your post together. I preempted our view of your post by explaining to her who Joni Webb is and what an honor it was for you to have taken the time to answer my Dear Miss Cote De Texas request and how your knowledge and experience was something she should take to heart. After she rolled her eyes at me we actually spent a good 24 1/2 minutes of mother/daughter bonding time looking at all of the photos we both agreed that a soft turquoise(her language)french blue(my language)for the wall color. When school is out this summer we plan to do a complete overhaul. I will definitely keep you posted.
    Thanks again for the wonderful pictures! You hit the nail on the head when you said I was looking for something other than Pottery Barn's "beachy" "zebra" themed rooms! I hope to sway her in a look like Elizabeth's current room...we shall see!

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  46. ahaha - it's called aqua. i think that would be great! and remember, you can add a piece of zebra in a throw, easily removed a year later! i hope you have a chance to read all the comments where people are telling their own stories.

    it's been a great comment section today. Anons - stay away!!! haha!

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    1. Actually Joni, there have been a number of great Anon comments. You should appreciate the readership you have. Remember any comment is better than none at all. Some bloggers are lucky to get ten a post. Touchy, touchy!!

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    2. From one Anon to another.....lighten up! You sound a little touchy yourself. Joni said,"Ha, ha!" and I think she meant it.

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    3. Read again, bad ass, Joni said Anons - stay away!!

      Looks like you are the one that needs to lighten up touchy.

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    4. I love you b*tchy anonymouses (anonymi?) - you have to find fault with EVERYTHING and argue with EVERYBODY!

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    5. Actually Denise, I post as anonymous and I think this is a really cool and informative post. It is one of the best Joni has produced among many other great ones. It seems that the only bitchy response so far has been yours.

      Cool your jets, Denise and give yourself some breathing room. There is enough bandwidth here for more than one opinion although I am certain people like you believe your opinion is all that counts.

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    6. **Pouting** I'm an "anon" but that's because I'm not a blogger and I don't have any of those types of accounts (I can barely remember my bank password). I love blogs that allow anon comments. But I would N*E*V*E*R post a nasty one! I do like being able to comment, but I think nasty comments should just be deleted.

      Delete
    7. Uncle! I'm out after this. I have no problem with anyone who disagrees with design styles, expresses different opinions from those of Joni, or of others who post. I just think there's a polite way to do it that doesn't include insulting remarks. There is room for all kinds of design styles, opinions, input and I enjoy reading comments from many different points of view. It's a learning process for me. But....for those who think it desirable or necessary to make personal criticisms and rude remarks, there is nothing to do but ignore those and learn from the more thoughtful posts. But "bad ass" written on this blog? Seriously?!
      Nothing wrong with spirited, thoughtful disagreement, or preferring another style. That's what gives the design world interest and energy. I don't always like the particular decorating styles that any blogger posts, but I usually enjoy seeing them, and learn something, expand my vision. I appreciate their time and effort in sharing information with me.
      Peace.

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  47. I remember the bedspread I got at 15. It was pale yellow with mostly green flowers. I loved sunny yellow with dark bottle green accents (yes, it was the '90s). On a raspberry hand-me-down rug I got (but liked) from my cousin.

    I loved girlie-country and colour. I was always a rather worried/fearful teen, and yellow was sunny and comforting.

    I will come out in defense of zebra; I would like a small zebra Louis chair and a zebra skin rug right NOW, grown woman or not. And I love black and white. I think there's a way to work a teen's love of zebra or black and white into an attractive room. It's a matter of ratios. Or I like to hope so, anyway, for my sake!

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  48. Joni and Stacy - thanks so much for this blog - the question and the extensive answer!

    I have a 16 y.o. daughter and we've moved quite a bit. So she's had seven versions of her room. She also has a bedroom suite of furniture that was my mother's (her grandmother's) childhood furniture from my grandmother's (her great grandmother's) house. Whew! The furniture wasn't expensive to begin with, so when my grandmother passed, my mother had the furniture repaired as much as possible and painted cream. The artist painted soft purple flowers with lots of greenery as accents on the furniture.

    We don't make my daughter use the furniture, but she decides to use it most of the time. She has soft green walls and the painted furniture - and a purple shag rug. Two walls have tasteful decor, including the painting that inspired the furniture's purple floral detail. And two walls are completely hers. The wall with the door has a pair of bulletin boards for her mums, invitations, etc - and this wall really can't be seen from the hallway. But the wall opposite is Sarah Grace's triumph! It is full of 4x6 photos of SG and her friends, tightly hung, each touching the next. Every one is of smiling happy girls (and a few boys). It is truly wonderful. Friends (and our younger Houston cousins) like to look for themselves. It is a great conversation piece.

    When I was a child, I had Holly Hobbie wallpaper. Later, my mother and I selected a cream paper with blue stripes. The adults hung it over the Holly Hobbie wallpaper - and I could always see Holly. Everyone else swore they couldn't, but I could!

    Anyway, thanks again!
    Libby

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  49. This reminds me of the bedroom that my mother, her designer, and I put together when I was about ten years old (1970). The designer believed that fabrics in bedrooms worked well when curtains, bed coverings, and chair upholstery were from the same bolt. Somewhere I spotted a fabric of stylized maps - blues and greens and a little orangish brown on a white background. I said that's what I wanted, and it certainly mirrored my great interest in travel, geography, adventure and maps. The rug was navy blue, the furniture was all from the campaign style, and I filled the shelves with atlases, as well as the books on space exploration and ocean faring vessels that captured my imagination. It helped that the room had incredible light from large windows on two sides, and that the shape of the room offered alcoves for study, dressing and reading. I can't quite fathom using that fabric today, 40 years later, but respect my mother and Mrs. Director for including me in the design decision (and soon after giving me my own subscription to Architectural Digest).

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  50. Great post, Joni! It appeals to the little girl in me!! Best wishes.

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  51. I love all of the rooms you collected. The rooms are so sophisticated but have a youthful feel. Although, I really would love to have that mirrored tufted headboard, forget the kids!!!

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  52. Great, love the taffeta, love the linen. BUT WHAT ABOUT BOYS? my boys are fairly cooperative, and their rooms look nice, with nice furniture and linens and art, but I am still interested in seeing boys rooms. Joni, I know you have shown some nice ones from houston but it's fairly rare. I really enjoy them when I see them.

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    1. Charlotte Des FleursMay 10, 2012 at 9:28 PM

      The Ginger Barber room (with Louis XVI Twin Beds and Black and white Gingham) would work for a boy or boys. The large dark gray, chippy looking dresser between the beds would hold a lot of "Stuff". The framed prints could be of animals, ships, guns or other typically masculine items. I love the Napoleonic look for boys if you are trying for a French look. Charles Faudree has written several books on French design. He has some very heavy duty red bedrooms with lots of dark wood that are very masculine.

      My son had a very ornate Louis XV twin bed for years. The rest of his furniture was mahogany and cherry to match. He and I haunted antique stores together and he really enjoyed the process. Rather than crystal chandeliers, he prefers the black wrought iron ones and / or wrought iron sconces. (However, nothing Gothic or dungeonish.)

      It is very handy to get boys and young men interested in design. They can help you haul rugs and large pieces of furniture with much less griping than husbands. After all, that shows how tough and manly they are. It also gives them bragging rights to their friends - "I hung ALL those lights!"

      When we moved into our home 10 years ago, my son hung 6 Bevolo-like lanterns in our long interior hallway, multiple chandeliers and fancy exterior coach lights. What he saved us in electricians' fees almost made up for what we spent to send him to college. (Ha, Ha, NOT!)

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  53. Hi Joni, my daughter is 14 years old and we recently completed her room. (She's an only child too!) Up until this time, I have always taken the lead on decorating her room but this time I let her make ALL of the decisions. You see we moved from the Washington, DC area to Dallas in December of her 7th grade year. Can you think of a worse time to move? My husband accepted a new position so here we are. You can imagine the guilt we felt and told her she could do whatever she wanted. Fortunately, she loved my childhood furniture. You know the kind that many of us had -- that french looking off white furniture with gold painted accents. We had it sprayed with white lacquer and it looks so much better -- especially the four poster bed. I could do without the desk with shelves above but she likes it. We had a love seat recovered in a white fabric. My daughter insisted on orange walls -- yes! Orange walls! So we did it. The attached bathroom is bubble gum pink (I prefer calling it that instead of Pepto Bismal pink!). All of the bedding is white and very fluffy. We had her monngram sewn on the euros on the bed -- oversize in pink and orange. It is gorgeous and looks very Leontine Linens but without the cost. We did the same on her white shower curtain. And then had throw pillows made out of a fun fabric with orange and pink for the love seat and the seats of the vanity and desk. We had beautiful window treatments made that are white with silver accents. And, of course, we had an ENORMOUS cork board made that goes over the love seat. Finally, I had just sold my parent's home and had saved my mother's dining room chandelier so that is now hanging in her room. It is gorgeous! She loves her room and so do her friends! All of this to tell you that once she tires of the orange and pink all that we will need to change out are the pillows and the paint! I have to tell you that she has already started hinting that she might be ready for a different color. Needless to say, I roll my eyes at her! We haven't even hung a picture in our own bedroom, let alone painted it or have had any window treatments made yet. So you are right. Teenagers change their minds a million times. Make the decisions on the big pricey items. Let them make the decisions on the lesser expensive items. It is less painful that way. And, no, she is keeping her orange and pink for much longer -- at least until after we "do" the master bedroom!

    Thanks for the fun post.

    Diana

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  54. I love the gingham check with the twins beds and painted chest. I really takes my breath away and would not have to be modified much for a boy, but still, I would like to see similar quality rooms for a boy

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  55. I grew up in the country and my parents didn't make much money; most of the money they spent on me went to my horse supplies. I didn't even know such a thing as designer rooms existed. But my mother did manage to redo my room herself, and she had some fun ideas. My favorite thing was a HUGE bulletin board - it literally covered the upper half of one entire wall, probably a 4'x8' piece. She took some sort of bulletin board type material - don't know what it was - and covered it in blue burlap. All of my "stuff", including awards and ribbons from horse shows, photos of Davy Jones, oh yeah, everything, went on this board. It was my favorite thing, and it kept the rest of my room looking neat. I kept that for years.

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  56. This couldn't have come at a more perfect time! We're moving to Franklin, TN, and with my oldest entering middle school, I decided she gets an all new room. White is my base, but I'll add color in the pillows and throw like the first images you shared. That way, when she changes her color mood, we can make changes for not too much money! She doesn't have strong opinions, so you'd think that makes it easier on me, but I really want it to reflect her (meaning, not too subdued and French like me). Trickier than I thought!

    xo,
    Linsey

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  57. Kudos to anons!!! Despite the snark, Anons often give the most honest feedback of any who post comments on this blog. Anons are often referred to as cowards, but truthfully, the sycophants who suck up to the author and spread the sugar coated praise no matter what is posted are really the cowards. Totally gutless in the name of "feelings". Grow up, grow a pair and realize that not every post or subject or home for that matter is worthy of the goddesses falling out of heaven with vessels filled with design nectar hoping to sound cool by confirming mediocre design.

    This is a worthy post. A question posted by a parent like many of us who have crossed these design bridges ourselves from time to time. I think the responses have been great and informative. Opinions should never be censored nor shut down because they don't fall in line with the status quo. It would be refreshing to see a bit more maturity on this site by readers. I often wonder how some of you were raised given the fact that all you people ever refer to are "feelings". Show some maturity and realize that if you cannot defend your design choices, you have probably made bad ones. Look, listen, learn. What a novel idea for some of you.

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  58. The above clarification is directed at the Anon poster who referred to another Anon as "bitchy". Seriously???

    I think anons have been very positive today because there was much to be positive about thanks to Joni's topic. It was thought provoking and informative - the mark of a good design blog - not just another download from HAR.

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  59. Lord I was a pinning fool here...from beautiful bedrooms to wonderful window treatments.....Score.

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  60. Charlotte Des FleursMay 11, 2012 at 11:38 AM

    HELP!!! I am stumped. I love the proportions of the scallopes on the matlassee coverlets in the Gray and white Guestroom by Pam Pierce. The edge finish suggests that they are ready-made. I have been searching the internet for two days now. Normally, I am the Queen of Internet Searches. However, this time, not so much. I have found several coverlets but most of the scallops look more like waves than scallops.

    I am staging a home for sale and would rather not have to have a coverlet made. I need white or ivory - not linen or ecru.

    Can anyone help??

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    1. They aren't the same as Pam Pierce, but Pine Cone Hill has some good looking scalloped edge matelesse.

      Delete
    2. Charlotte Des FleursMay 11, 2012 at 5:22 PM

      Thanks, Anon. Good suggestion. It looks very nice but the price. Ouch! I need a King which is nearly $450 without tax or shipping. Still... it does look nice. Thanks, again!

      Any other ideas from the group? I am checking HomeGoods tomorrow. For those of you who do, pray for me to get lucky! It seems I always see things like this at HomeGoods when I don't need them!

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    3. Try jcpenney.com

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  61. Wowsers Joni...great post. I love looking at the feminine touch! My son's didn't care too much in college but now I notice the older married one wants my opinion but says it's up to his wife! hehe
    Happy Mother's Day!
    xx

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  62. These are beautiful rooms, but I'm just wondering where all the Bieber and One Direction posters, musical instruments, sports gear, and all other teenage 'junk' will go!

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  63. I love your rooms Joni as they remind me so much of my Grandma's house.

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  64. Oh how I have missed your posts Joni (I've been away for from blogland for 6 months). And this post didn't disappoint either. Fabulous :)

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  65. This is for Charlotte. Search for "matelassee" at jcpenney.com. They have spreads, coverlets, and skirts for very reasonable prices.

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    1. Charlotte Des FleursMay 13, 2012 at 1:19 PM

      Thanks for the tip! The scallops are not quite as defined as I would like, but the price is right AND they offer both white and ivory.

      Delete
  66. Beautiful post, Joni! Wish my girls were back home so I could start all over again with decorating their rooms with them. They are both grown and have children of their own and have done an outstanding job decorating their children's rooms. This brings back wonderful memories even of my bedroom growing up. Never had the Pepto-Bismal pink bedroom either. Mine was full of my grandmother's antiques and I loved it all even as a young girl. Thanks for sharing your amazing style and expertise even in a young girl's sacred space!

    ~ Victoria in Texas

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  67. All the room ideas are lovely. I always tend to lean toward a more sophisticated room for my kids because I agree with many posters that kids change their minds A LOT! I absolutely love that you touched on the paintings by Laurence Amelie. She is a beautiful painter and I love all of her work. I am lucky to have one of her gorgeous Tutus in my girl's room.

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  68. Hi Joni,
    Your daughter must be thirlled to have such a stunning first apt, lucky girl! I love the slip covered sofa, a truly wonderful design you have put together for her. I love the Laurence Amelie painting, something new to mee. This comes at a perfect time since my client and I, are currently working on her daugter's room. She is turning ten this month and sez "I have a baby's room, I wish I had a newly decorated bedroom for my birthday" :-) I will certainly share this super fun post with her for inspiration!

    Wishing you an extra special Mother's Day Joni,
    Fondly,
    Laurie

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  69. Gorgeous post! Everything is simply stunning..So inspiring :)

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  70. Great post! I have a 4 year old daughter and 6 year old son and have spent probably about $100 on each childs room. I used stuff I already owned and spent a little money on artwork to pull it together. I think sometimes when you don't have much money the end result is minimal, classic, serene - bascially what people spend a lot of money to achieve!

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