COTE DE TEXAS: INDIA COMES TO THE SKIRTED ROUNDTABLE

INDIA COMES TO THE SKIRTED ROUNDTABLE

 

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This week on the Skirted Roundtable, we interview India Hicks to discuss her new line with HSN- the Home Shopping Network.  Of course, we were happy to discuss her home décor & bedding merchandise, but talking about her life was even more of a thrill!   Had you told me 25 years ago that one day I would be interviewing a bridesmaid of Princess Diana, I would have told you you were daft (British lingo!)

But that’s exactly who India is – a bridesmaid at one of the most famous weddings of all times.   She is also a 2nd cousin and a godchild of Prince Charles.  India’s mother was one of Queen Elizabeth’s bridesmaids and was her lady-in-waiting.   Even more incredible, her granddaughter was the last Viceroy of India, the Earl of Mountbatten who was later assassinated by IRA terrorists.

 

 

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India Hicks, second on the left, bridesmaid to Princess Diana.  Such a beautiful and memorable photograph.

 

Her full name is India Amanda Caroline Hicks – I love how the English have double middle names (I don’t even have one!)   She is 678th in line for succession to the Crown of England, but, once Prince William’s baby is born, she will be dropped down by one. 

Raised mostly in the countryside of England, India claims she was a bit of a tomboy.    Her formal education was cut short when she was expelled from Gourdonstone, the austere boarding school in Scotland which many royals used to attend, for entertaining boys in her room!  The scandal!   After school, blessed with her patrician good looks, she began to model for various designer and later, mostly for Ralph Lauren. 

 

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But more important to design aficionados is India’s non-royal side.  She is the daughter of David Hicks, one of the most influential interior designers of our times.   Known for his unerring eye,  Hicks designed everything for himself and his clients - from rooms, to gardens, to jewelry – even noses – according to India.   Her father had built a house in the Bahamas where she spent a good part of her youth and on a visit there as a young adult, she rekindled a friendship with an Expat, designer, David Flint Wood.   Together they bought a 50’s house named Hibiscus Hill and renovated it from top to bottom, turning it into more of a Caribbean plantation styled house.  They now have four children and recently added to their brood with a fifth, an older Bahamian teen who was orphaned.  

 

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I love this photograph of India and her daughter Domino. You can really see the famous pink sand of the island in this picture which was taken in India’s “back yard.”

 

She and Wood wrote a book on their island lifestyle which lead to another one.  Along the way they became hoteliers.   They have four properties in their small chain- three on Harbour Island and  another, her father’s house on Eluerthra, which India inherited.

Her coastal brand has proved quite popular and India has her hand in all kinds of design – jewelry, clothing, bedding, and household accessories.  She has a line with Crabtree and Evelyn, along with her new HSN collaboration , of which her first showing sold out.   She has two more visits planned at HSN for this summer and September.  Her partner David also does interiors and was recently published in Architectural Digest when he decorated Brooke Shields NYC townhouse.  Brooke had visited with India and David in the Bahamas and wanted him to recreate the wonderful feel of their house, which she loved so much.

 

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India’s jewelry – I LOVE this cuff!

 

Hibiscus Hill has been photographed many times over the years – which is quite understandable.  It’s a warm, cozy, and coastal chic family house.  Though built in the 50s, it seems much older due to all the renovations they have made.  

 

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The couple have made tried to make the house look older.  To the left, they added a second story where they each have their own office.

 

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Another view of Hibiscus Hill.  The property is over three acres and is located right on the beach.

 

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In the entry way between the living room and dining room – a white table and mirror sets the stage for what’s to come – lots of accessories and charming English styled clutter.

 

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The couple changed the concrete floor for hardwoods to give it more of a Caribbean vibe.  Slip covered sofa in deep pink.   Pillows made out of her father David Hick’s fabric.  And, taking a cue from her father – there are lots of accessories around.

 

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In a later photo, a large leather ottoman designed by India’s brother is placed in front of the white coffee table.    As India says:  “My father always drove into us that collections are so much more powerful than a single element.”    You can see she really takes that lesson to heart.  Also, in this photoshoot – it says the couple has painted their floors black, though originally they were brown.  I love the black floors – seen here!

 

 

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Another view of the living room showing the fireplace – and the brown wood floors. 

 

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The French mantel is original to the house.  The chairs are now covered in a light blue fabric.

 

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An earlier decorating scheme – the sofa was slipped in a pink striped fabric.

 

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And in an early view of the room – the chairs were covered in a coral pink fabric. 

 

 

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David Flint Wood added bookcases to flank the opening to the dining room.

 

 

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Above the doorway – a row of straw hats.   Earlier view shows stripes on the chairs.

 

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Today, the chairs wear pink fabric.   The floors are just beautiful – brown or black. 

 

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The crystal chandelier came with the house and the couple liked the way it looked.   I do too!

 

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Along one wall – framed photographs rest on shelves. 

 

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Under carpet in the master bedroom – the couple found the original Cuban tile. 

 

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During the Skirted Roundtable interview, India tells a cute story about her father commenting on their bed. 

 

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Across from the bed, an antique desk and chair, in pink.

 

 

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Daughter Domino’s room has an antique French bed surrounded by a set of prints.  Charming!

 

 

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India’s office has pink walls and black and white toile.  Love all the pink!  Underfoot is apple matting – a typical English fiber used for rugs.

 

 

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Another view of her office.

 

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David’s office is quite different – much more English in feel.  David loves these ceiling fans with a black motor and wood blades.  He feels they give a house a true Caribbean feeling.  Sssh.  Don’t tell Ben that!!

 

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The terrace, shaded by a trellis.

 

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A play house located on the lawn is really a charming folly.

 

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The gate to the beach with the pink sand.

 

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After living with guests in the house almost year round, the couple decided to build a guest house on their property for visiting family and friends.  This house, called The Guest House, built in 1999, looks much older due to its architecture.   The house is available to rent – see the Hibiscus Hill web site HERE.

 

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Wide verandas overlook ocean views.  Love the front door that opens to screen doors! 

 

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The living room with twin sofas and chairs.  So cute!!!

 

 

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Pottery Barn hired India to do styling – she changed the décor in this living room using all PB items for the photoshoot.

 

 

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The dining room.   Through the left door – you can see the wood stairs.   The kitchen is to the right.

 

 

 

 

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India’s shell collection.

 

 

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Upstairs veranda – with a view of the beach.  Must be so beautiful.   You can arrange for a cook if you rent out the house.

 

 

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There are four bedrooms – I love this one so much!!

 

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I especially love the oval portrait.

 

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A twin bedroom.

 

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Beautiful.   Love the prints.

 

 

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The guests’ beach.

 

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The couple added a second guest house on their property called The Cricket Pavilion based on an old club house they found on another island.   This has two bedrooms and a more contemporary feel.  It is located back off the beach.

 

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All white, David Hicks fabric is found on the two chairs.

 

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The family, when there were only two boys – today there are five children.

 

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A huge old birdhouse and table divide the area between the living room and the kitchen.

 

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The kitchen at the Cricket Pavilion.

 

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The King’s Treat is the third guest house – located in the historic part of Dunmore Town with views of the harbor.  The house was built in 1890s and David completely restored it. 

 

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The veranda set for outdoor meals.

 

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The furniture comes from Pottery Barn, but Wood had it slipped in a special chintz.  Dark, black painted wood floors gleam against the white walls.  Love this room!

 

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Love the old books.

 

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Inside, there are two master bedrooms.

 

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Love this one with the framed prints.

 

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Map paper was used on the walls.

 

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The kitchen is Ikea!  It’s so great looking.  Love the walls of subway tiles. 

 

 

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One of the decorated verandas.

 

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There is a tiny guest house on the property with another bedroom and bath inside.  Great for the teenagers.

 

image           The guest house bedroom with twin beds from Anthropologie.   I love how they use catalogues mixed with high end items to create a wonderful undecorated look.   David Flint Wood said he didn’t want his guest houses to look decorated, rather he wanted them to look evolved.

 

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The fourth and last guest house is located on another island 50 miles away – on Windermere off Eleuthera.  The Savannah guest house was designed and built by India’s father David Hicks, and was inspired by the Egyptian temple of King Zoser.   Hicks built the house in 1967, the year that India was born.  They spent spring holidays here and this is where India was staying when she was reacquainted with her childhood friend David Flint Wood.    Today, the house is where the Wood gang comes to holiday, away from the busier island they live on.   This house sits on five miles of private beach.

 

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The walls are concrete – rendered with the famous pink Bahamian sand and textured with seashells.  When a hurricane hit it a few years back, India redecorated it, but it is very different looking than their other properties on Harbour Island.    The house has two king bedrooms, one twin and one bunk room – each with their own bathroom. 

 

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Bright pops of color come mostly from the art work – the furniture is neutral and the pillows are pastel.   Beautiful!!

 

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Looking towards the other direction. 

 

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The dining room was updated with new chairs recently. 

 

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View from outside in.

 

 

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Kitchen.  I like the blue against the sand color.

 

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Master with pops of brown and orange.

 

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Twin room.

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And bunk room.

 

All four houses are available for rent.   I’m trying to decide which one I like the best – the two on their property?   The older house in town?   Or, the original Hicks contemporary house on its own secluded beach?   I think I would pick the Guest House on their property.  Now, if only I scrape the pennies together!

 

 

 

If you like their coastal decorating style and want to incorporate the look or feel of it into your own landlocked house – take a look at Brooke Shields townhouse in NYC.  Brooke feel in love with David Flint Wood’s aesthetic and asked him to recreate the look in her own house.   The task was not easy – how you recreate the feel of a Bahamian house without it looking silly or out of place.  I think he reached the perfect compromise:

 

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The 1910, four story townhouse was a complete gut job. 

 

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Right away – you can see David’s aesthetic with the black stained hardwood floors.  They are so gorgeous!  

 

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Look at the doors that close off the living room, yet still let the light in.   A David Hicks print is found on the antique stool.  The jute rug from Pottery Barn gives it the high-low factor.

 

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The antique French furniture wears casual linens accented by John Robshaw prints.  Elegant antiques flank the sofa. 

 

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The dining room is fabulous with Jansen chairs and a vintage Ralph Lauren table.   A Zuber paper covers the walls.

 

 

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I love the kitchen with its black painted cabinets and the fireplace is to die for!!!  Hermes orange leather cover the English George III styled chairs.  All the English antiques lend the townhouse with the Colonial Plantation vibe. 

 

 

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Love the bar shelves with the crystal.

 

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Brooke’s study with a fabulous French green chair and antique Italian desk.

 

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Mid century modern styled chairs mix with an antique LV trunk.

 

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The guest room feels like a David Hicks room with its brown lacquered walls.  Wonderful orange suede chair.   Love this!

 

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The master bedroom has a colonial feel with its Anglo-Indian tester bed. 

 

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When Lady Pamela and David Hicks married in 1960, they bought Birtwell House, a grand house built in the 1700s – with wings added during the 20th century.   They lived here with their three children, including India, until they moved to the smaller The Grove, where Lady Pamela still lives today, years after her husband passed away.

 

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The Grove.   Hicks decorated the inside and the outside. 

 

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Last year India and her daughter Domino did a story at The Grove for Hello Magazine.  Here, they are in the front hall with flag floor. 

 

 

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The Drawing Room at The Grove.  So beautiful!!

 

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The fireplace.  Love the gueridon table with marble top.

 

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View from across the room – that painting!!!!

 

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India and her mother Lady Pamela in the Drawing Room.  Over the years, if a fabric or carpet needs replacing, the same exact design is chosen to keep Hick’s original plan intact.

 

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David Hicks’ Library at The Grove.   For a time he insisted all the books be either red leather or covered in red paper.

 

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The man, David Hicks, himself, at his desk. 

 

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And India, in the same space.

 

To order books by India Hicks and about her family, click on the image below:

 

 

 

 

To order from India’s décor and bedding line and her jewelry line, or to read her fab blog, go HERE.

To rent one of the guest houses in the Bahamas, go HERE.

And finally, be sure to listen to our interview with India on The Skirted Roundtable, HERE.

 

 

 

41 comments :

  1. Looking forward to the interview on the SRT. Wouldn't it be a fabulous vacation at any of the guest houses.
    Karen

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  2. This was great, she is so classy and elegant without being over the top. I have long envied her amazing island life, who doesn't dream of waking up to pink sands and the gentle roar of the ocean while being surrounded by gorgeous eclectic British Colonial decor! I love all the guest homes and any one of them would be a treat to stay in but the ones on premise are my favorite! Thanks for a great post.....

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  3. Wonderful post. I have the Island Life book and love it - I will forever love that pink sofa. I think India Hicks has my ideal life.

    I still have the Brooke Shields issue of Architectural Digest because I was so in love with her house - I didn't realise it was David Flint Wood.

    Yes, those rooms at the Grange are beautiful - I've never seen them before. Grand but cosy. Old fashioned but modern. I don't usually like patterned carpet but loved the carpet in The Grange drawing room.

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  4. I love the colonial island style. We lived in Haiti for a number of years and the old world Caribbean vibe gets me every time. Maybe we will rent one of those guest houses. Like you, I like the one on their property. And I love what David did to Brooke's NYC home. Thank you for your research on the history of these houses and compilation of all the wonderful photos! I love when one of your posts pops up!

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  5. Brooke Shields house has been a favorite and now I know why.

    What a fairy tale life- and dream homes. India seems like a very classy lady and such a beautiful family!

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  6. Thanks for this fab post. As a Caribbean native I always feel that India and David's aesthetic make them truly part of us and I am inspired by their design as they collect and preserve parts of our history. Caroline in Trinidad and Tobago.

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  7. The Grove is simply fabulous and timeless as is the home designed for Brooke Shields. This was a great post and a worthy introduction to India and her very talented husband.

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  8. Oh wow, lovely pictures and I love her style.

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  9. Joni a completely mesmerizing account of life in the islands, India;s life no less!
    A very classic and elegant look, yet casual enough for a family!
    The remodel of Brooke's home by David is amazing as well.

    xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena
    Giveaway from Splendid Sass

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  10. Another fabulous post, Joni! I have to say I've always been partial to an English aesthetic, and pairing those dark wood traditional furniture pieces with all the white gives it that island feel. I also love all the accessories and artwork - the collected look, so typically English. My favorites are probably The Guest House (the first one) - I love the accent of the dark wood trim - and the historic one, The King's Treat, in town. They are both casual and relaxed while still mostly traditional. And I love the feel of David's office - it makes clutter look so good. Though I've seen it used before (probably in a Pottery Barn catalog), the shelves in the dining room with the family photographs struck me as a particularly inspirational display. Love the way they're arranged and use different frames in different sizes, with older ones obviously in their original frames. (I think I rebel against the trend of matting and framing all family photos alike and spacing them evenly on a grid.) What a creative couple!

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  11. I love what they do! What an interesting story.xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

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  12. Brooke Shields is a style icon. The woman can almost do no wrong. What a princess lifestyle Mrs. Hicks lives, at least from my perspective. And she has to be gorgeous, too?!

    BAALLKK. PFFT!

    I am curious to see your take on this, new-to-me, information in the link below. I think it's a crying shame.

    http://blog.chron.com/primeproperty/2013/06/18-luxury-homes-planned-for-river-oaks-area/

    texassky

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    1. that aint river oaks!!!! it's just another gates community near by.

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  13. India Hicks has mastered the relaxed style with elegance. Reading this post makes me want to take a real vacation to an island...soon. I LOVE Brooke Shields Dutch tile on her kitchen walls! I am having the same with all the variations of white installed in my kitchen.

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  14. I have listened to the SRT and believe that I know no more about India Hicks than I did before I started. Everything was already covered in this post. While I realize that she wanted to talk about and promote her HSN collection, there was a wealth of information your listeners would have much preferred being privy to. As someone commented, Jonie needs either a better phone or perhaps she needs to speak more directly into the phone she already has. Secondly, it is really annoying listening to three grown women act like school girls having just met Elvis. Do you have a game plan, an outline as it were that starts you on your path to conversation other than "how did you get started". What value to your listeners was the question about the time zone in the Bahamas - we weren't making dinner reservations. From the sound of India's voice, she appeared to think it an unusual starter as well. Unfortunately for Linda, it looked elementary and not ready for "prime time". You girls have far to much research at hand to have let such a wealth of information get lost in the nitty gritty world of ooohing and aaaahing the way you did. Unless there were questions that were declared off limits, you girls clearly missed the bulls eye by an English country mile. Better luck next time. Hopefully, you will be more prepared.

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    1. i don't know why i'm having trouble being heard. haven't listened to it. but i'll look into it. there is an issue with 3 people asking questions without seeing each other and interrupting each other. the interview was highly edited from an hour to about 35 minutes. i need to go listen to it to see what you mean. we do get information before - but we do always ask that one question at first and it's been a great ice breaker over the past 3 years. sometimes guests do not shut up, they talk and elaborate on every question - those are the best kinds. others, you ask a question and they answer with just a few sentences. which does make it harder. not sure which kind of guest she was. i'll go listen to see how horrible it was.

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  15. Thanks for the heads up on India Hicks. I still have the AD (as most others)of Shields home. Thanks for this beautiful and informative post.

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  16. Beautiful post, appreciate the time you spent on it!
    Thank you,
    Hope you have a lovely summer...
    xo,
    Gail
    http://www.casualloveselegance.blogspot.com

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  17. I hope you get Rachael Ashwell on TSRT..if I missed it, do you have an archive? What about Betty Lou Phillips....she is so nice and approachable. I've called her myself! I love Tracery Interiors too! Love the post. One thing I don't understand is if people don't like your blog or interviews, why do they read, subscribe, or tune in? Why bother commenting? Perhaps I will stop reading the comment section...

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    1. Anon. 9:48pm, why the angst? Go listen to the interview and you may be surprised. That always helps before commenting and making assumptions about someone not liking the blog or the interviews. Perhaps ignoring the comments would be better for you given the fact that you interpret them incorrectly. I am stunned that after edits, Joni and perhaps the others as well have not listened. How can you publish a podcast and not want to listen to the final content before releasing it to listeners? The article that Joni wrote clearly indicates that India lives in the Bahamas. Linda ask her early in the conversation if she was in the Bahamas to which India answers "yes". Then I believe it is again Linda who says "nice" or "that's nice". Well duh, India lives there. That India is David Hicks' daughter and barely a question about him, his work, growing up with such a repository of talent was asked is mind boggling. As stated above, the question regarding the time zone was really the "kicker". As to the quality of the audio, it is clear that of the three, Joni's voice was not as clear as the others. This is not a criticism. Joni may have no idea that her audio was poor if she has not listened. I am certain she will want to correct this issue before the next interview.

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    2. Hello anon - since you've made such a big deal twice here and over on the SRT blog over my question re: India being in the Bahamas and the time, let me answer. You may or may not be aware of this, but people do actually travel away from their homes on occasion <--- that was intentional sarcasm, in case you weren't sure. Because of the unique nature of SRT interviews over Skype, our guests can chat with us from anywhere and they do. We've spoken to guests from their offices, their homes and from vacation destinations. Asking if she was in the Bahamas when we were speaking was merely politeness and to help our listeners envision where she was sitting when we spoke. She could have been in the UK or LA for all I knew as I didn't set up the interview. Asking about what time it was may seem silly to you and I could have maybe edited it out but I suspect 3 seconds of frippery isn't all that important in the world. I do the editing and do my best (though I am not a professional editor and none of us are paid to be doing this) to make the podcasts as easy to listen to as possible - which means removing (as best I can) silences, over-talking, repeated questions for clarity, etc. As Joni mentions above, having a conversation with someone when you're not looking at them can be difficult and some of our chats will go better than others for that reason. Just to correct Joni a bit, we spoke with India for about 45 minutes tops because we started late and India had to be finished by a specific time.

      Also, just for clarification, we record our podcasts, I edit them and they are published. This can take several few weeks depending on schedules. We each write a blog post to promote the podcast AFTER the actual recording took place, not vice versa. So, if a one of our individual posts has more detailed information than our conversation contained, it's because it's done after the fact.

      Finally, our chat was with India Hicks, her lifestyle and her product lines, it was not meant to be (nor was it billed as) a "Hicks on Hicks" conversation. Thank you for your feedback, which gave me the opportunity to explain how these things are done.

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    3. I have a mic which wasn't working so I tried the iPhone one. I just bought a new one so hopefully I will be louder. I agree with Linda, we have no clue where people are and it does help to set the scene, hence , where are you, what time is it where you are. Further, I happen to like to find info from the interview. I could have done extensive research before, but I knew her basic history and that it is interesting to me at least, to see what the person will say in explanation. As for her father. Linda edits. The truth is, I think we all got the feeling that exactly what India said was all she really wanted to say. We were asked by her pr firm to discuss the line on hsn. So we did try to do that. But alas, there is on,y so much you can say about a line that has been sold out. They wanted the interview to be before her appearance but due to scheduling, that didnt happen. Like I said, some people are very easy to talk to and the convo flows. Caroline roehme and Charlotte moss were both like this. India was much quieter and less talkative. When someone stops talking we have to wait a second to figure out who is going to ask the next question. Linda edits outs those pauses. It's just not quite as easy as you might think because of the missing visual cues. I do realize that my post was redundant with the interview, but truthfully a lot of people don't listen so I try to make it interesting to those who won't listen to the srt.

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    4. And one further point. I can't listen to the interview until it is finished and put on the web. I don't understand why that is an issue to you? I remembered what we talked about before writing my post, but my post is meant to be a stand alone expose anyway. Once it is posted I usually listen to it. Not sure why you even mention thatà.

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    5. If Linda can edit and listen, why is she not able to send you an audio file so you can do the same thing. I would think you would have a modicum of interest for the sake of self improvement if nothing else. Obviously not!

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    6. Linda, thanks for your explanation and your sarcasm. Both are enlightening on many fronts. Now if I may level a bit of mine toward your answer. Indeed if one is being interviewed and is the party calling in to the three of you, you would not have any idea where the call or Skype was coming from. However, if someone tells you that they are in the Bahamas and you follow up with an ignorant question as to what time zone it is in, then it begs the question just how intelligent the interviewer really is. It was certainly one of the worst interviews I have listed to on the SRT, both in content and in audio. Instead of being defensive, you should be taking steps to improve your format and content.

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    7. 8:59, what do you want me to do with the interview after it's done and edited? I don't understand? she edits it, we put it up. I listen. I just hadn't had a chance to hear it at that point, but I had lived it, I knew what it was. the only thing I wasn't aware of was how low my voice was coming through. there's nothing to be done about it. not sure where this is going? what is your point? if i listen to it before I put up my post or not, why do you care? seems like you are just trying to think of things of criticize. i always listen to the recording. but after it is edited and recorded - really after it is recorded, there's nothing left to do about it.

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    8. 9:10 - ok, we get your point. you hated that question!! ok. this is the 4th time you have pointed it out. we hear you! LInda will never ask someone what time it is in their zone again - OR she may ask it everytime now!!! I get that not all interviews are fabulous. We've had some great ones and some not so great ones. We have even had one that we never put out. That was a real doozy! Like I said, I would have been happy just gossiping about the royal family and Princess Diana, but that was NOT our agreement. Nor was our agreement to make a story about DAvid Hicks. India is her own person and that was her focus, thus it was ours. We did get her to talk about his house and his reaction to her living in the Bahamas and she told us an interesting story about her father. She did talk about him some. I suppose we could interview her brother who did write a book about his father. But this story was about India and her line with HSN.

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    9. You still don't get it, Joni. The time zone question is pointed out only because of its sheer stupidity. Do you mean to tell us that either of you would not know that if a person is in the Bahamas and you are sitting in Boston that you are in the same time zone? I have never heard that question asked before on the SRT. And yes, I do understand that India is her own person, with her own career and business enterprise, but a few questions about how her father's design aesthetic and how it may have influenced her would have been more interesting than the droning on about HSN. No one expected questions on the royals - past or present. It is probably the fault of excessive editing that this interview left so much to be desired. More shocking as well is the fact that it doesn't seem important enough for you to listen to the final edit before putting it out for your readers.

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    10. Assuming that one of the three of you keeps the original audio file, it would be useful to listen to what you believe to be the final edit before publishing so that the content is not one sided and there are a variety of topics covered. Remember that while you said you did not need to listen because "you had lived it", your listeners have not. It is about your listeners, right? I suppose the voice issue with you Joni would not be helped by this as it appears to be equipment related. Also remember that perhaps that person you interviewed will come back to the SRT and listen as well. That should be enough to encourage you to make the final product the best it can be.

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    11. Linda,if you are reading your comments, then you will see that three out of three believe the interview fell short of expectation. Looks like you are the one in another "time zone" - sarcasm intended!

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  18. I've admired India Hicks and her lovely style.
    Wonderful post...

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  19. It's interesting to see the (David) Hicks house today. He was such a stickler for order, and unfortunately that seems to have slipped - crooked lampshades etc. I was such an admirer of his work, and had the opportunity to lunch with him many years ago in Hong Kong; the less said about that the better, however!

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  20. One of my favorite garden books is by David Hicks, My Kind of Garden. Fascinating post, Thanks!

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  21. Perhaps it's just me, but has anyone noticed the striking resemblance between Lady Pamela and David Hicks?

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  22. Good grief. Such carping and criticism. It didn't come across as helpful criticism. I fail to see the point of that kind of post, other than to demonstrate how smart the commenter is. Anyone can criticize. I've forgotten who said, "Enjoy when you can, endure when you must." Or go find something else to listen to that suits you better. I enjoyed seeing everything. Will listen to SRT. I am forewarned! Will report back. I bet I find something to enjoy about it.

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  23. The best illustrated post on the Hicks/Loftus interiors.Bravo.

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  24. Hello, I love your inspirational blog. Could you please tell me the name of the chintz fabric used to cover the pottery barn sofa and chairs?
    Thank you.

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